10

I use Newtonsoft.Json library

Is there a way to trim spaces from any string data during deserialization?

class Program
{
    class Person
    {
        [JsonProperty("name")]
        public string Name;
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var p = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Person>(@"{ name: "" John "" }");
        Console.WriteLine("Name is: \"{0}\"", p.Name);
    }
}

Added:

Finally, I've got solution with custom converter. Not nice, but better then property with Trim().

If anyone has any ideas how to do it in more natural way, please welcome.

class Program
{
    sealed class TrimAttribute : Attribute
    { }

    class TrimConverter<T> : JsonConverter where T : new()
    {
        public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
        {
        }

        public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
        {
            var jObject = JObject.Load(reader);
            var obj = new T();
            serializer.Populate(jObject.CreateReader(), obj);

            var props = objectType.GetFields(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
                .Where(p => p.FieldType == typeof(string))
                .Where(p => Attribute.GetCustomAttributes(p).Any(u => (Type) u.TypeId == typeof(TrimAttribute)))
                ;

            foreach (var fieldInfo in props)
            {
                var val = (string) fieldInfo.GetValue(obj);
                fieldInfo.SetValue(obj, val.Trim());
            }

            return obj;
        }

        public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
        {
            return objectType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof (T));
        }
    }

    [JsonConverter(typeof(TrimConverter<Person>))]
    class Person
    {
        [JsonProperty("name")]
        [Trim]
        public string Name;

        [JsonProperty("surname")]
        public string Surname;
    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var p = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Person>(@"{ name: "" John "", surname: "" Smith "" }");
        Console.WriteLine("Name is: \"{0}\", \"{1}\"", p.Name, p.Surname);
    }
}
  • Why does the data have extra spaces inside the string? That shouldn't be. – Tim S. Oct 9 '13 at 12:14
  • Tim - it should not, but it is there... :( – Alexander Jun 13 '17 at 10:44
11

You could write your own JsonConverter:

public class TrimmingConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanRead => true;
    public override bool CanWrite => false;

    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType) => objectType == typeof(string);

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType,
                                    object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        return ((string)reader.Value)?.Trim();
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, 
                                   JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

You can use it like this to apply to all string fields:

var json = @"{ name:"" John "" }"
var p = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Person>(json, new TrimmingConverter());
Console.WriteLine("Name is: \"{0}\"", p.Name);
//Name is: "John"

Or you can apply this to certain fields only:

public class Person
{
    [JsonProperty("name")]
    [JsonConverter(typeof(TrimmingConverter))] // <-- that's the important line
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("other")]
    public string Other { get; set; }
}

var json = @"{ name:"" John "", other:"" blah blah blah "" }"
var p = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Person>(json);
Console.WriteLine("Name is: \"{0}\"", p.Name);
Console.WriteLine("Other is: \"{0}\"", p.Other);

//Name is: "John"
//Other is: " blah blah blah "
  • thanx, look interesting. I wonder, how come this converter skips any other fields? – Sam Fisher Oct 9 '13 at 13:20
  • @SamFisher It's based on the CanConvert: currently it will do this on all string fields. You can modify CanConvert and ReadJson (reader has lots of details about the field you're deserializing) to be more specific if you want to. E.g. in your example, Json.net asks if it CanConvert both Person and string - based on the response, it only uses this converter on the string field. – Tim S. Oct 9 '13 at 14:24
  • @SamFisher I've added an example of how to only apply it to certain properties. – Tim S. Oct 9 '13 at 14:43
  • Thanx. Now it's clear. – Sam Fisher Oct 9 '13 at 14:53
0

The solution provide above didnt work for me. I modified Sam Fisher solution and combined it with Timmerz solution. how to get both fields and properties in single call via reflection?

public sealed class TrimAttribute : Attribute {
}

public static class TrimConverterExtension {
  public static void SetValue(this MemberInfo member, object property, object value) {
     switch (member.MemberType) {
        case MemberTypes.Property:
           ((PropertyInfo)member).SetValue(property, value, null);
           break;
        case MemberTypes.Field:
           ((FieldInfo)member).SetValue(property, value);
           break;
        default:
           throw new Exception("Property must be of type FieldInfo or PropertyInfo");
     }
  }

  public static object GetValue(this MemberInfo member, object property) {
     switch (member.MemberType) {
        case MemberTypes.Property:
           return ((PropertyInfo)member).GetValue(property, null);
        case MemberTypes.Field:
           return ((FieldInfo)member).GetValue(property);
        default:
           throw new Exception("Property must be of type FieldInfo or PropertyInfo");
     }
  }

  public static Type GetMemberType(this MemberInfo member) {
     switch (member.MemberType) {
        case MemberTypes.Field:
           return ((FieldInfo)member).FieldType;
        case MemberTypes.Property:
           return ((PropertyInfo)member).PropertyType;
        case MemberTypes.Event:
           return ((EventInfo)member).EventHandlerType;
        default:
           throw new ArgumentException("MemberInfo must be if type FieldInfo, PropertyInfo or EventInfo", "member");
     }
  }
}

public class TrimConverter<T> : JsonConverter where T : new() {
  public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer) {
  }

  public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer) {
     var jObject = JObject.Load(reader);
     var obj = new T();
     serializer.Populate(jObject.CreateReader(), obj);

     //Looks for the trim attribute on the property
     const BindingFlags bindingFlags = BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance;
     IEnumerable<MemberInfo> members = objectType.GetFields(bindingFlags).Cast<MemberInfo>()
         .Concat(objectType.GetProperties(bindingFlags))
         .Where(p => p.GetMemberType() == typeof(string))
         .Where(p => Attribute.GetCustomAttributes(p).Any(u => (Type)u.TypeId == typeof(TrimAttribute)))

         .ToArray();

     foreach (var fieldInfo in members) {
        var val = (string)fieldInfo.GetValue(obj);
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(val)) {
           fieldInfo.SetValue(obj, val.Trim());
        }
     }

     return obj;
  }

  public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType) {
     return objectType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(T));
  }
}

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