3

Question

More out of curiosity, but I was wondering how to refactor an if statement to something cleaner / less brittle. From what I have read, polymorphism could have a use?

In the example I only want to return the first car if color:'red' is true.

Coffeescript

example: () ->
    cars = [{color:'red', reg:'111'},{color:'blue', reg:'666'}]
    if cars[0].color is 'red' 
    then cars[0]
    else cars[1]

Javascript

  example: function() {
    var cars = [{color:'red',reg:'111'},{color:'blue',reg:'666'}];
    if (cars[0].color === 'red') {
      return cars[0];
    } else {
      return cars[1];
    }
  }

I understand this question maybe closed or moved due to the ambiguous nature

3
  • I don't know if polymorphism could be useful here, but it does look like car could get it's own constructor function with a getColor method on it's prototype. Oct 9, 2013 at 12:18
  • It's called "shorthand" you can read about some javascript shorthands here jquery4u.com/javascript/shorthand-javascript-techniques : )
    – thinklinux
    Oct 9, 2013 at 12:20
  • In python, the ternary statements are as: 1<10 and 5 or 6 which gives 5
    – Pe Dro
    Apr 19, 2022 at 17:22

6 Answers 6

6

? : operator is exactly that, a "cleaner" if-else

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty67wk28.aspx

classify = (input < 0) ? "negative" : "positive";

There are also switch statements for larger combinations:

http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_switch.asp

switch(n)
{
case 1:
  execute code block 1
  break;
case 2:
  execute code block 2
  break;
default:
  code to be executed if n is different from case 1 and 2
}

Polymorphism is an abstract concept, not a way to write a statement. It's the practice of creating a method/function/class/etc where type is at least SOMEWHAT ambiguous. So the same method could return a result if fed, say, an integer for parameter 1, the same as if you were to feed an array into the same parameter.

0
6

You can use ternary operator, its syntax is condition ? result1 : result2;

return cars[0].color === 'red' ? colors[0] : colors[1]
2

Just for fun :

// red     -> +false -> 0
// not red -> +true  -> 1
return cars[+(cars[0].color !== 'red')];
1
  • If I was accepting on giggles / fun factor, this would be the answer. :D Oct 9, 2013 at 13:19
1

Turning Car into an object:

function Car(options) {
    this.options = {};
    // Some default options for your object
    $.extend(this.options, {
        color: "green",
        buildYear: 1990,
        tires: 4,
        brand: "merceded"
    }, options);
}

// A method registered on the prototype
Car.prototype.getColor = function () {
    return this.options.color;
};

var myToyota = new Car({
    brand: "toyota"
});

console.log("My Toyota is: "+ myToyota.getColor());

example: http://jsfiddle.net/YthH8/

Keep in mind that are are many ways you can use objects / inheritance in JavaScript.
Coffee script has it's own syntactic sugar for using classes => http://coffeescript.org/#classes

1
  • Thanks for the answer. I believe my question still remains, in that I have to see test for the color red correct? Oct 9, 2013 at 12:57
1

There is a ternar operator ? used mostly when you don't want to use if-else statement:

example: function() {
    var cars = [{color:'red',reg:'111'},{color:'blue',reg:'666'}];

    return cars[0].color === 'red' ? cars[0] : cars[1];
  }
0

const example = () => {
    var cars = [{color:'red',reg:'111'},{color:'blue',reg:'666'}];
    return (cars[0].color === 'red' && cars[0]) ||
        cars[1];
}

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