2

I know that syntax is valid, but my question is whether it is logically valid:

<parent>
    <name>John</name>
    <child>Mary</child>
    <child>Lucy</child>
    <child>Hannah</child>
</parent>

or a proper way to do this is:

<parent>
    <name>John</name>
    <child>
        <name>Mary</name>
    </child>
    <child>
        <name>Lucy</name>
    </child>
    <child>
        <name>Hannah</name>
    </child>
</parent>

Is there some document online that definitely says what's right and wrong?

2
  • 4
    There is no document online, or elsewhere, that defines the semantic of any random XML document. There's no single "proper" way to do it, either. It all depends on specific data stored, future extensibility requirements, typical processing expected, etc. – Pavel Minaev Dec 18 '09 at 16:50
  • @Pavel, why don't you write that as an answer? I'll surely up-vote it. – Milan Babuškov Dec 18 '09 at 17:52

10 Answers 10

1

It's worth mentioning that the term "valid" has a specific meaning in XML.

An XML document is valid if and only if it conforms to its DTD or schema. Basically, the universe of strings of text is divided into two categories: those that are well-formed XML, and those that aren't. The universe of well-formed XML documents also is divided into three categories: valid XML documents (which conform to their DTD/schema), invalid XML documents (which don't), and those whose validity cannot be determined (because they don't have a DTD/schema).

As far as your actual question goes, you can only judge the design of an XML document on the basis of its fitness to the purpose for which it is to be used. Are you going to be transforming it with XSLT? Querying it with XPath? Processing it with Linq-to-XML? Processing it with a SAX reader? Deserializing the data in it into objects? Editing it in Notepad? Validating it against a schema? Transporting it over a slow network? All of those things (and there are many more) should influence the design of your XML. There is no one right answer.

15

I prefer the latter, as it makes clear that it's the NAME of the child that is Mary, and not that the CHILD ITSELF that is Mary.

I think that using attributes is even better, like so:

<parent name="John">
    <child name="Mary" />
    <child name="Lucy" />
    <child name="Hannah" />
</parent>

because it makes it clear that the name is just a characteristic of the parent/child entity.

8
  • 1
    I prefer this, because otherwise the parent's name has the same logical weight as their children. – Skilldrick Dec 18 '09 at 16:48
  • I have seen XML parses in the past in some applications not like the fact that an element has no text node. They consider it non-standard (SAP was that way, I think - I have no idea if it still is), so to have a significant element with no text node can sometimes be taken as an empty tag, even if it has attributes. So this solution makes the XML less bloated, but might not fit all scenarios. – Yishai Dec 18 '09 at 16:51
  • I like the way @Shoko made the parent name into an attribute. But could you tell me when it's ideal to make something an attribute rather than an element? I find it very confusing sometimes. Sorry for hijacking the thread :) – Helen Neely Dec 18 '09 at 16:53
  • @Yishai: To me that reads: "this solution makes the XML less bloated, but might not fit braindead parsers" – R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 18 '09 at 16:53
  • 2
    It also uses less bytes in transmission but if transamission size is really an overriding concern, XML (or certainly XML with lots of metadata like the examples on this page) is probably not the best place to be anyway. EDI like syntax might be smaller like "John|Mary|Lucy|Hannah" and if you accept binary and dictionary you can get really really really tiny... +1 – martinr Dec 18 '09 at 16:54
6

The second one seems to make more sense from an extensibility point of view. What happens if you need to add birthday for a child in the first one? Yes, you could add an XML attribute but you'll end up sooner or later getting stuck on adding a complex type or even basic enum to it.

Also - it may be better to group the child elements under a single 'children' element:

<parent>
    <name>John</name>
    <children>
      <child>
        <name>Mary</name>
        <dob>1970-01-01</dob>
      </child>
      <child>
        <name>Lucy</name>
        <dob>1971-01-01</dob>
      </child>
      <child>
        <name>Hannah</name>
        <dob>1974-01-01</dob>
      </child>
    <children>
</parent>

One more thing: you probably wouldn't group the children under one single parent element, but I've left that in-line with your original.

2
  • I'm not going to downvote you for not representing your dates in ISO8602 format, but I should. – Robert Rossney Dec 18 '09 at 18:40
  • I was thinking of that, but couldn't be bothered. True story. – Wim Hollebrandse Dec 18 '09 at 18:46
5

It depends on what you are going to do with it. The 2nd version is better if there's a chance you will need to store more data about each person in the future.

2
  • 1
    so, you're saying that both ways are valid, but 2nd should be preferred? – Milan Babuškov Dec 18 '09 at 16:50
  • If your data storage needs aren't ever going to change, then the 1st option would work fine. The 2nd option is more flexible so it might be better since your data needs almost always changes in the future. – David Dec 18 '09 at 17:05
2

The second is preferable. This makes it clear that name is a property of a child and does not identify the child iteself.

Think of it in terms of classes:

This

class Parent {
    string Name;
    List<Child> Children;
}

class Child {
    string Name;
}

is preferable to

class Parent {
    string Name; 
    List<string> Children;
}

The second option also gives you the flexibility to expand in the future (add a birthday element, for example).

The more subjective debate is whether to use elements or attributes for properties like name, etc.

Finally, add a children element with the child elements contained there.

2

There is no right answer to this question, of course, but if the child is more complex (or could grow to be more complex) than a single string of text, then the second option is preferable.

In terms of what you usually see, generally in either case all the child elements would be grouped under a children element. In certain visualization environments, it can help to just close away all the children while other elements retain the focus.

2

I would use an alternative between Shoko and DanDan or Wim Hollebrandse:

<parent name="John">
  <children>
    <child name="Mary" />
    <child name="Lucy" />
    <child name="Hannah" />
  </children>
</parent>

because I like the "set" of child which are actually children.

1

It is XML, there is no right or wrong. Both your answers are correct, however this is equally valid:

<parent>
  <name>John</name>
  <children>
    <child>Mary</child>
    <child>Lucy</child>
    <child>Hannah</child>
  </children>
</parent>

Which way should you choose? It depends on the task. I do not think any of the ways presented are the most flexible (what if the children have children?)

1

Both are right. There are no definition on how to structure your element - it's entirely up to you!

Some people tries to minimice the number of nodes. And those people would maybe create the xml like

<parent name="John">
    <child name="Mary" />
    <child name="Lucy" />
    <child name="Hannah" />
</parent>

But the clue about XML is that you should always make it as easly as possible to read and understand, for human beeings. Screw the comupters, they will always understand you XML, so make it human readble!

1
  • An attribute is a node in the XML infoset. – Pete Kirkham Dec 18 '09 at 17:21
1

There are no standards for how to map data to an XML Schema. There are some common practices, one of which is to use striped XML, so nested element take type/relation/type/relation roles alternately:

<!-- striped style, RDF etc -->
<person>
    <name>John</name>
    <children>
        <person>
            <name>Mary</name>
        </person>
        <person>
            <name>Lucy</name>
        </person>
        <person>
            <name>Hannah</name>
        </person>
    <children>
</parent>

This is very regular, but somewhat more verbose.

It's generally a bad idea to put human readable text into attributes to save space:

<person name="fred"/>

As that precludes use of ruby mark up which is necessary for some forms of internationalisation, as well as being more complicated to render using CSS. If you're only concerned with compact representation and ASCII text, XML might not be the best format to be working with.

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