101

Want to trim each string in an array, e.g., given

x = [' aa ', ' bb '];

output

['aa', 'bb']

My first trial is

x.map(String.prototype.trim.apply)

It got "TypeError: Function.prototype.apply was called on undefined, which is a undefined and not a function" in chromium.

Then I tried

x.map(function(s) { return String.prototype.trim.apply(s); });

It works. What's the difference?

12 Answers 12

153

Or this can be solved with arrow functions:

trimmed_x = x.map(s => s.trim());
5
  • 13
    I suggest: let trimedArr = oldArr.map(str => str.trim()); Jan 17, 2017 at 8:34
  • @Dominic I am using this but when I minify my js that time it will give the error I am using javascript-minifier.com site for minify js Feb 6, 2019 at 11:26
  • 1
    @SachinSarola looks like that minifier is out of date with modern JS syntax. It's better to build and minify your JS as part of a build pipeline anyway using e.g. webpack
    – Dominic
    Feb 6, 2019 at 12:02
  • For me, x.map(s => return s.trim()); worked but the above did not.
    – rafagarci
    Jun 30, 2021 at 7:21
  • @rafagarci that's a syntax error, you'd need braces around the return statement
    – Bergi
    Sep 29, 2023 at 16:49
109

String.prototype.trim.apply is the Function.prototype.apply method without being bound to trim. map will invoke it with the string, the index and the array as arguments and nothing (undefined) for the thisArg - however, apply expects to be called on functions:

var apply = String.prototype.trim.apply;
apply.call(undefined, x[0], 0, x) // TypeError

What you can do is passing the trim function as the context for call:

[' aa ', ' bb '].map(Function.prototype.call, String.prototype.trim)
// ['aa', 'bb']

What happens here is

var call = Function.prototype.call,
    trim = String.prototype.trim;
call.call(trim, x[0], 0, x) ≡
      trim.call(x[0], 0, x) ≡
            x[0].trim(0, x); // the arguments don't matter to trim
5
  • 1
    I see. I thought that fun would have the same meaning with function(x) { return fun(x); }.
    – neuront
    Oct 10, 2013 at 12:08
  • This won't work on IE8: String.prototype.trim doesn't work with IE8. May 14, 2014 at 8:50
  • 2
    @SachinKainth: The question is not about trim, OP assumes that it is available. If you want to try out the snippets in IE8, you obviously will need to shim trim and map.
    – Bergi
    May 14, 2014 at 9:14
  • 1
    This is very outdated with ES6 syntax you can do this much easier: const newArray = oldArray.map(string => string.trim())
    – svelandiag
    Apr 19, 2021 at 3:01
  • 1
    @svelandiag The explanation why apply isn't bound, and how to use the thisArgument, is still accurate. Of course, arr.map(function(str) { return str.trim(); }) or arr.map(str => str.trim()) has always been simpler.
    – Bergi
    Apr 19, 2021 at 8:58
40

The simple variant without dependencies:

 for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
     array[i] = array[i].trim()
 }

ES6 variant:

const newArray = oldArray.map(string => string.trim())

ES6 function variant:

const trimmedArray = array => array.map(string => string.trim())
28

If you are using JQuery, then a better way to do this, as it will work with IE8 as well (I need to support IE8) is this:

$.map([' aa ', ' bb ', '   cc '], $.trim);
1
  • 35
    @DenysSéguret "If" is the keyword here.
    – gburning
    Apr 21, 2016 at 22:51
18

First, do it simply :

x.map(function(s) { return s.trim() });

Then, the reason why the first one doesn't work is that the string is passed as argument to the callback, not as context. As you pass no argument to apply, you get the same message you would have got with

var f = String.prototype.trim.apply; f.call();

Now, mostly for fun, let's suppose you're not happy with the fact that map use the callback this way and you'd want to be able to pass a function using the context, not the argument.

Then you could do this :

Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "maprec", {
  value: function(cb){
      return this.map(function(v){ return cb.call(v) })
  }
});
console.log([' aa ', ' bb '].maprec(String.prototype.trim)); // logs ["aa", "bb"]

I said "mostly for fun" because modifying objects you don't own (Array's prototype here) is widely seen as a bad practice. But you could also make a utilitarian function taking both the array and the callback as arguments.

1
  • You mean the same message you would have got with String.prototype.trim.apply.call(), don't you?
    – Butt4cak3
    Oct 10, 2013 at 11:06
5

I just compared some ways to trim an array of strings to get the shortest and fastest method. Who is interested in, here is a performance test on jsperf: http://jsperf.com/trim-array-of-strings

var chunks = "  .root  ,  .parent  >  .child  ".split(',')
var trimmed1 = chunks.map(Function.prototype.call, String.prototype.trim);
var trimmed2 = chunks.map(function (str) { return str.trim(); });
var trimmed3 = chunks.map(str => str.trim());
var trimmed4 = $.map(chunks, $.trim);

Note: jQuery is just here to compare the number of characters to type ;)

3

Influencing from Bergi's perfect answer, i just would like to add, for those methods which won't take a this argument, you may achieve the same job as follows;

var x = [' aa ', ' bb '],
    y = x.map(Function.prototype.call.bind(String.prototype.trim))
1
  • Worked really well!
    – Sanjay
    Feb 26, 2018 at 6:03
3

Keep it simple and stupid:

Code

[' aa ', ' b b ', '   c c '].map(i=>i.trim());

Output

["aa", "b b", "c c"]
1
  • 1
    Why repeat an answer already given one year earlier?
    – Forage
    May 18, 2021 at 14:13
1
var x = [" aa ", " bb "];
console.log(x); // => [" aa ", " bb "]

// remove whitespaces from both sides of each value in the array
x.forEach(function(value, index){
  x[index] = value.trim();
});

console.log(x); // => ["aa", "bb"]

All major browsers support forEach(), but note that IE supports it only beginning from version 9.

1

x = [' aa ', ' bb ', 'cccc '].toString().replace(/\s*\,\s*/g, ",").trim().split(",");

console.log(x)

-2

Another ES6 alternative

const row_arr = ['a ', ' b' , ' c ', 'd'];
const trimed_arr = row_arr.map(str => str.trim());
console.log(trimed_arr); // <== ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
3
  • 1
    array_map is not a native JS function and not defined here. => does not work.
    – musemind
    Feb 13, 2019 at 9:55
  • @Greg the first version of this answer included an unspecified array_map() method
    – musemind
    Jan 21, 2020 at 11:25
  • @musemind My mistake -- I should have looked at edits
    – Greg
    Feb 3, 2020 at 23:52
-2
    ### Code
    <!-- language: lang-js -->

     var x=  [' aa ', ' b b ', '   c c ']
var x = x.split(",");
            x = x.map(function (el) {
                return el.trim();
                console.log(x)

    ### Output
    <!-- language: lang-none -->
        ["aa", "b b", "c c"]     
4
  • 2
    Please put your answer always in context instead of just pasting code. See here for more details. Feb 15, 2019 at 9:47
  • 1
    Are you sure about that? When trying to use your code, the following error is thrown: TypeError: x.split is not a function
    – Nico Haase
    Feb 15, 2019 at 11:01
  • ### Try once this code.... var x= [' aa ', ' b b ', ' c c '] var x = x.split(","); x = x.map(function (el) { return el.trim(); console.log(x) Feb 15, 2019 at 11:16
  • ### TRY var x = x.split(","); x = x.map(function (el) { return el.trim(); console.log(x) Feb 15, 2019 at 11:21

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