15

I've long used an idiom in Java for using the class information of a (non-abstract) class in the methods of its (generally abstract) ancestor class(es) (unfortunately I can't find the name of this pattern):

public abstract class Abstract<T extends Abstract<T>> {
    private final Class<T> subClass;

    protected Abstract(Class<T> subClass) {
        this.subClass = subClass;
    }

    protected T getSomethingElseWithSameType() {
        ....
    }
}

An example of a subclass thereof:

public class NonGeneric extends Abstract<NonGeneric> {
    public NonGeneric() {
        super(NonGeneric.class);
    }
}

However, I'm having trouble defining a subclass of Abstract which has its own generic parameters:

public class Generic<T> extends Abstract<Generic<T>> {
    public Generic() {
        super(Generic.class);
    }
}

This example is not compilable; likewise, it is not possible to specify the generic types using e.g. Generic<T>.class or even to use a wildcard like Generic<?>.

I also tried replacing the declaration of generic type T in the superclass to ? extends T, but that isn't compilable either.

Is there any way I can get this pattern to work with generic base classes?

  • I can't find the name of this pattern: Sounds like its Strategy pattern – Maxim Shoustin Oct 11 '13 at 7:49
  • 1
    It's not a pattern, it's an idiom in java, potentially to circumvent the poor generics implementation... And no idea how it's called. – Augusto Oct 11 '13 at 7:52
  • I think you're looking for the curiously recurring template pattern - i.e. the "self-type". Java doesn't support the self type and it can only be approximated. – Paul Bellora Oct 11 '13 at 18:58
  • "I've long used a design pattnern" There is no such pattern in Java. What you are doing can be done with public abstract class Abstract<T> – newacct Oct 12 '13 at 10:12
  • I have pretty much rewritten the code in my answer - there's now a cast-free solution there for you. – Bohemian Oct 12 '13 at 13:00
11

The "pattern" (idiom) of passing an instance of Class<T> (typically to the constructor) is using Class Literals as Runtime-Type Tokens, and is used to keep a runtime reference to the generic type, which is otherwise erased.

The solution is firstly to change the token class bound to:

Class<? extends T>

and then to put a similar requirement on your generic subclass as you did with your super class; have the concrete class pass a type token, but you can type it properly as a parameter:

These classes compile without casts or warnings:

public abstract class Abstract<T extends Abstract<T>> {
    private final Class<? extends T> subClass;

    protected Abstract(Class<? extends T> subClass) {
        this.subClass = subClass;
    }
}

public class NonGeneric extends Abstract<NonGeneric> {
    public NonGeneric() {
        super(NonGeneric.class);
    }
}

public class Generic<T> extends Abstract<Generic<T>> {
    public Generic(Class<? extends Generic<T>> clazz) {
        super(clazz);
    }
}

And finally at the concrete class, if you declare the usage as its own class, it doesn't require a cast anywhere:

public class IntegerGeneric extends Generic<Integer> {
    public IntegerGeneric() {
        super(IntegerGeneric.class);
    }
}

I haven't figured out how to create an instance of Generic (anonymous or not) without a cast:

// can someone fill in the parameters without a cast?
new Generic<Integer>(???);     // typed direct instance
new Generic<Integer>(???) { }; // anonymous

I don't think it's possible, but I welcome being shown otherwise.

  • I thought of this way, but then you have to perform cast while passing argument to the constructor anyway. I guess cast cannot be avoided. If you can find some way without cast, that would be appreciable. :) – Rohit Jain Oct 11 '13 at 13:52
  • @RohitJain this does not require a cast if you declare concrete impls as their own class - see edit. I think you would need a cast for an anonymous impl or an instance of Generic itself. – Bohemian Oct 11 '13 at 14:41
  • Did you mean extends Generic<GenericFoo>? – Paul Bellora Oct 11 '13 at 18:54
  • @RohitJain It compiles now. The change was to the parameter type of the sub class's constructor to be Class<Generic<Integer>>. So you can declare a subclass without any casting. – Bohemian Oct 12 '13 at 1:04
  • @RohitJain Finally, I've cracked it :) – Bohemian Oct 12 '13 at 12:32
3

The major problem you have got here is, there is no class literal for concrete parameterized type. And that makes sense, since parameterized types don't have any runtime type information. So, you can only have class literal with raw types, in this case Generic.class.

Reference:

Well, that's fine, but Generic.class gives you a Class<Generic> which is not compatible with Class<Generic<T>>. A workaround is to find a way to convert it to Class<Generic<T>>, but that too you can't do directly. You would have to add an intermediate cast to Class<?>, which represents the family of all the instantiation of Class. And then downcast to Class<Generic<T>>, which will remove the compiler error, though you will an unchecked cast warning. You can annotate the constructor with @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") to remove the warning.

class Generic<T> extends Abstract<Generic<T>> {     
    public Generic() {
        super((Class<Generic<T>>)(Class<?>)Generic.class);
    }
}
  • @Bohemian Even I didn't find myself using it before today itself. IMO, I refrain from framing such a complex generic structure, which would force me to do something like this. In other words, I like to treat my fellow programmer's well. ;) – Rohit Jain Oct 11 '13 at 12:05
  • fyi I think I figured out a cleaner way - see my answer – Bohemian Oct 11 '13 at 12:40
-1

There is no need in Class<T> subClass argument. Change:

protected Abstract(Class<T> subClass) {
    this.subClass = subClass;
}

to:

protected Abstract(Class subClass) {
    this.subClass = subClass;
}

and everything will compile.

  • 2
    That works in most cases, but in my specific case, I also use the Class object to dynamically cast to T, which also gets ugly. The more I use other languages, the more I realise how messed up Java generics are. – errantlinguist Oct 11 '13 at 8:11
  • Do not overuse generics, this is not a panacea. They just help to develop, no more. – Mikhail Oct 11 '13 at 8:14

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