52

I have this Javascript object.

req.session

In my code I add properties to this object. These properties can be other objects, arrays, or just plain strings.

req.session.savedDoc = someObject; 
req.session.errors = ['someThing', 'anotherThing', 'thirdThing'];
req.session.message = 'someString'

If I later would like to erase all added properties of this object, what is the easiest/best way?

There must be a better way than this?

// Delete all session values
delete req.session.savedDoc;
delete req.session.errors;
delete req.session.message;
42

Simply assign an empty object:

req.session = {};

... and the garbage collector will do the rest automatically.


UPDATE: Since this answer is disputable, I would like to provide some more details on the point.

The solution given above will do the job for the author in the current situation, as well as any other valid solution provided in this question. It mainly depends on the way how the developer wants to manipulate the deprecated data.

Session object may contain data that is linked by different variable, and setting a new empty object to req.session will not break the reference to the old data, so the old data will be available where it is still required. Although the correct way to keep old data is to clone the initial object, real life scenarios can be different. Let's look at the following example:

req.session.user = { name: 'Alexander' };  // we store an object in the session
var session = req.session;                 // save reference to the session in a variable
console.log( req.session, session );       // {user: Object}, {user: Object}

req.session = {};                          // let's replace session with a new object
console.log( req.session, session );       // {}, {user: Object}

We still can fetch old data from session variable but req.session is empty: here setting a new object works as sort of alternative to deep cloning. The garbage collector will not remove data from old req.session object as it is still referenced by session variable.

Deep cleaning of the object with method provided by @Dave or shorter via Object.keys (which ignores properties in the prototype chain and doesn't require any shims for node.js):

Object.keys(object).forEach(function(key) { delete object[key]; });

... will explicitly remove all values from the req.session object and, since session variable is linked to the same object, session will become empty as well. Let's see how it works:

req.session.user = { name: 'Alexander' };  // we store an object in the session
var session = req.session;                 // save reference to the session in a variable
console.log( req.session, session );       // {user: Object}, {user: Object}

Object.keys(req.session).forEach(function(key) { delete req.session[key]; });
console.log( req.session, session );       // {}, {}

As you can see now, in both cases we get empty objects.

From speed and memory perspectives setting new empty object will be much faster than cleaning the old object property by property, however memory-wise if old data is still referenced somewhere, the new object approach won't free up memory that old data is consuming.

It's quite obvious that choosing the approach to take is mostly up to your coding scenario, but in most cases req.session = {}; will do the job: it is fast and short. However, if you keep references to the original object in other variables, you may consider using deep implicit object properties deletion.

  • 1
    I wonder its better to use req.session = null or the req.session = {}. Express site suggests to set it to null expressjs.com/api.html#cookieSession – Sriharsha Oct 11 '13 at 11:40
  • 51
    This is a useful answer, but I don't feel it is complete as it does not actually remove all properties from an object. If you have 2 references to the same object, req.session1 and req.session2 and assign req.session1 = {}. Then req.session2 remains the same with all of it's properties still defined – Theo Feb 19 '14 at 11:57
  • 15
    Although the result is an empty object, the object now references to a new point in memory - i.e. new object. That means if there was any double reference to that object, it is now gone. Bottom line - this is not emptying the object but rather replacing it with a new one. – Tomer Apr 16 '14 at 12:50
  • 5
    This does not answer the OP's question. – Pete Alvin Dec 7 '14 at 17:29
  • 2
    He thinks it should print an empty object because that's what the question is asking. Once you remove all properties from an object, you have an empty object. – Dave Lugg Jun 30 '15 at 4:46
108

@VisioN's answer works if you want to clear that specific reference, but if you actually want to clear an object I found that this works:

for (var variableKey in vartoClear){
    if (vartoClear.hasOwnProperty(variableKey)){
        delete vartoClear[variableKey];
    }
}
  • 24
    Why doesn't this answer have more upvotes... This actually clears the object, instead of creating a new object (old data still there if old object referenced by something). – basic6 May 3 '15 at 20:06
  • 2
    Yep! What @basic6 said. I ran into this issue today where creating a new object was breaking another reference that I had. This should be the correct answer. – James Manes Jul 7 '16 at 15:37
  • this is the correct answer :) – user889030 Jun 30 '17 at 9:46
10

I can see only one correct solution for removing own properties from object:

for (var x in objectToClean) if (objectToClean.hasOwnProperty(x)) delete objectToClean[x];

If you want to use it more than once, you should create a cleaning function:

function deleteProperties(objectToClean) {
  for (var x in objectToClean) if (objectToClean.hasOwnProperty(x)) delete objectToClean[x];
}

For your case the usage would be:

deleteProperties(req.session);

This solution removes properties from the object wherever it's referenced and keeping the old reference.
Example:
Using empty object assignment:

var x = {a: 5};
var y = x;
x = {};    // x will be empty but y is still {a: 5}, also now reference is gone: x !== y

Using cleaning method:

var x = {a: 5};
var y = x;
deleteProperties(x);  // x and y are both empty and x === y
6

If you want to delete all properties without touching methods you can use :

for(var k in req.session) if(!req.session[k].constructor.toString().match(/^function Function\(/)) delete req.session[k];
  • 1
    WOW!!! That should go to the board of fantastic code :) – VisioN Oct 11 '13 at 11:37
  • Thanks ^^ the constructor.toString() thing is quite usefull, another one : if you want an improved version of typeof, try Object.prototype.toString.call(thing).replace(/^\[.+\s(.+)\]$/g, '$1').toLowerCase() :p – yent Oct 11 '13 at 12:04
  • But why not simply to use typeof req.session[k] === 'function' instead? – VisioN Oct 11 '13 at 12:06
  • Very true ... A while ago typeof only made difference between number, string, boolean, null and undefined, everything else returned "object", including function, so I got the habit of using something more precise ... Truth be told the code I gave is part of a bigger script I use in which I need to get the class name of an object whose class is defined using prototypes (function foo() { this.a = 1; } foo.prototype.doThing = function ...) ... – yent Oct 11 '13 at 12:17
  • for(var k in req.session) if(!(req.session[k] instanceof Function)) delete req.session[k]; – Domi Feb 18 '15 at 13:59
1

I've done it like this

var 
    i,
    keys = Object.keys(obj);
for(i = 0; i < keys.length; i++){
    delete obj[keys[i]];
}

You could add it to Object (prototype's not ideal here) - will be static.

Object.defineproperties(Object, {
    'clear': function(target){
        var 
            i,
            keys = Object.keys(target);
        for(i = 0; i < keys.length; i++){
            delete target[keys[i]];
        }
    }
});

Then you can clear random objects with

Object.clear(yourObj);

yourObj = {} replaces the reference to a new object, the above removes it's properties - reference is the same.

  • I'd like to add that that those are somewhat costly operations - restructuring and that there probably are better ways to achieve one's goals. – EnTr0cKs Feb 19 '17 at 17:30
0

This script removes property recursively except for the data reported in vector.

You need the lodash library

-- Function:

function removeKeysExcept(object, keysExcept = [], isFirstLevel = true) {
        let arrayKeysExcept = [],
            arrayNextKeysExcept = {};
        _.forEach(keysExcept, (value, i) => {
            let j = value.split('.');
            let keyExcept = j[0];
            arrayKeysExcept.push(keyExcept);
            j.shift();
            if (j.length) {
                j = j.join('.');
                if (!arrayNextKeysExcept[keyExcept]) {
                    arrayNextKeysExcept[keyExcept] = [];
                }
                arrayNextKeysExcept[keyExcept].push(j);
            }
        })
        _.forEach(arrayNextKeysExcept, (value, key) => {
            removeKeysExcept(object[key], value, false);
        });
        if (isFirstLevel) {
            return;
        }
        Object.keys(object).forEach(function (key) {
            if (arrayKeysExcept.indexOf(key) == -1) {
                delete object[key];
            }
        });
    }

Run so:

-- Removes all properties except the first level and reported in the vector:

removeKeysExcept(obj, ['department.id','user.id']);

-- Removes all properties

removeKeysExcept(obj, ['department.id','user.id'], false);

-- OUTPUT:

let obj = {
    a: {
        aa: 1,
        ab: {
            aba: 21
        }
    },
    b: 10,
    c: {
        ca: 100,
        cb: 200
    }
};

removeKeysExcept(obj, ['a.ab.aba','c.ca']);
/*OUTPUT: {
    a: {
        ab: {
            aba: 21
        }
    },
    b: 10,
    c: {
        ca: 100,
    }
};*/

removeKeysExcept(obj, ['a.ab.aba','c.ca'], false); //Remove too firt level
/*OUTPUT: {
    a: {
        ab: {
            aba: 21
        }
    },
    c: {
        ca: 100,
    }
};*/

removeKeysExcept(obj);
/*OUTPUT: {b:10};*/

removeKeysExcept(obj, [], false); //Remove too firt level
/*OUTPUT: {};*/

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