I have a table Stuff defined as...

id, <fields>..., active

Active is the soft-delete flag and is always 1 or 0. Long term this may go away in favor of a historical table.

public interface StuffRepository extends JpaRepository<StuffEntity, Long> {} 

In code, we always use active records. Is there any way to get Spring to always append an active=1 condition to queries generated for this repository? Or more ideally allow me to extend the grammar used to generate the queries?

I understand that I can create named @queues everywhere but then I lose the convenience of the generated queries. I also want to avoid polluting the interface with "active" methods.

I am using Hibernate 4.2 as my JPA implementation if that matters.

up vote 54 down vote accepted

This is an old question, and you probably already found the answer. BUT, for all the Spring/JPA/Hibernate programmers out there seeking for answer -

Say you have an entity Dog:

 @Entity
 public class Dog{

 ......(fields)....        

 @Column(name="is_active")
 private Boolean active;
 }

and a repository:

public interface DogRepository extends JpaRepository<Dog, Integer> {
} 

All you need to do is add the @Where annotation on the entity level, resulting:

@Entity
@Where(clause="is_active=1")
public class Dog{

......(fields)....        

@Column(name="is_active")
private Boolean active;
}

All the queries performed by the repository will automatically filter out the "non-active" rows.

  • 2
    I believe this is a Hibernate centric answer. If you have some docs that show that @Where is a JPA or Spring feature, please share them. – Andrew White Mar 6 '14 at 2:04
  • 2
    Yes, this is an Hibernate solution. I mentioned it in the answer first paragraph but apparently I wasn't 100% clear. So - this solution uses Hibernate's @Where annotation. Sorry, and thanks for the correction. BY THE WAY - the person who asked the question uses hibernate (4.2), which was the main reason for me to give an answer that complies to his needs. – Shay Elkayam Mar 7 '14 at 7:26
  • I think that 易天明 answer it's more complete – Adexe Rivera Aug 23 at 9:15
  • How do you do deletes in this case? Logically all JPA deletes should be update queries. Instead, with this method they will become Delete from table WHERE is_active = 1 – Adi Sep 23 at 10:25

@Where(clause="is_active=1") is not the best way to handle soft delete with spring data jpa.

First, it only works with hibernate implement.

Second, you can never fetch soft deleted entities with spring data.

My solution is el provided by spring data. #{#entityName} expression can be used on generic repository represent concrete entity type name.

And code will be like this:

//Override CrudRepository or PagingAndSortingRepository's query method:
@Override
@Query("select e from #{#entityName} e where e.deleteFlag=false")
public List<T> findAll();

//Look up deleted entities
@Query("select e from #{#entityName} e where e.deleteFlag=true")
public List<T> recycleBin(); 

//Soft delete.
@Query("update #{#entityName} e set e.deleteFlag=true where e.id=?1")
@Modifying
public void softDelete(String id); 
  • 1
    Upvoting your answer, not sure why it is not on top, because it answers the question in the most JPA/Spring-friendly manner. Thank you. – Max Mar 1 '16 at 21:23
  • What if e.id is not "id", but instead "userId" or "accountId", etc, will this still work or do I need to add this method to all of my Repositories? – cosbor11 Jul 15 '16 at 0:16
  • SpEL in spring data does not support variable represent an id now. So override these methods if your entity id is not named id. Most of your entity will be called id, I think. – 易天明 Oct 18 '16 at 2:21
  • 1
    What if the developer chooses to write jpql using the Spring data @Query annotation? – Muhammad Hewedy Mar 18 at 5:31

Based on 易天明 answer I've created CrudRepository implementation with overriden methods for soft delete:

@NoRepositoryBean
public interface SoftDeleteCrudRepository<T extends BasicEntity, ID extends Long> extends CrudRepository<T, ID> {
  @Override
  @Transactional(readOnly = true)
  @Query("select e from #{#entityName} e where e.isActive = true")
  List<T> findAll();

  @Override
  @Transactional(readOnly = true)
  @Query("select e from #{#entityName} e where e.id in ?1 and e.isActive = true")
  Iterable<T> findAll(Iterable<ID> ids);

  @Override
  @Transactional(readOnly = true)
  @Query("select e from #{#entityName} e where e.id = ?1 and e.isActive = true")
  T findOne(ID id);

  //Look up deleted entities
  @Query("select e from #{#entityName} e where e.isActive = false")
  @Transactional(readOnly = true)
  List<T> findInactive();

  @Override
  @Transactional(readOnly = true)
  @Query("select count(e) from #{#entityName} e where e.isActive = true")
  long count();

  @Override
  @Transactional(readOnly = true)
  default boolean exists(ID id) {
      return findOne(id) != null;
  }

  @Override
  @Query("update #{#entityName} e set e.isActive=false where e.id = ?1")
  @Transactional
  @Modifying
  void delete(Long id);


  @Override
  @Transactional
  default void delete(T entity) {
      delete(entity.getId());
  }

  @Override
  @Transactional
  default void delete(Iterable<? extends T> entities) {
      entities.forEach(entitiy -> delete(entitiy.getId()));
  }

  @Override
  @Query("update #{#entityName} e set e.isActive=false")
  @Transactional
  @Modifying
  void deleteAll();
}

It could be used with BasicEntity:

@MappedSuperclass
public abstract class BasicEntity {
  @Column(name = "is_active")
  private boolean isActive = true;

  public abstract Long getId();

  // isActive getters and setters...
}

And final entity:

@Entity
@Table(name = "town")
public class Town extends BasicEntity {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE, generator = "town_id_seq")
    @SequenceGenerator(name = "town_id_seq", sequenceName = "town_id_seq", allocationSize = 1)
    protected Long id;

    private String name;

    // getters and setters...
}
  • 3
    is it possible to integrate this with PagingAndSortingRepository? – Joaquín L. Robles Jun 30 '17 at 16:09
  • 1
    How would you override Page<T> findAll(Pageable pageable) for example? – alex Dec 11 '17 at 15:20

In current versions (up to 1.4.1) there's no dedicated support for soft deletes in Spring Data JPA. However, I strongly encourage you to play with the feature branch for DATAJPA-307 as this is a feature currently worked on for the upcoming release.

To use the current state update the version you use to 1.5.0.DATAJPA-307-SNAPSHOT and make sure you let it pull in the special Spring Data Commons version it needs to work. You should be able to follow the sample test case we have to see how to get that stuff working.

P.S.: I'll update the question once we finished working on the feature.

  • 2
    Looking forward to it. You're doing awesome work there Oliver! – Neil McGuigan Oct 15 '13 at 17:35
  • 8
    Did this make it into release? – Vineet Bhatia Aug 5 '14 at 19:50

You can extend from SimpleJpaRepository and create your own custom repository where you can define the soft delere functionality in a generic way.

You'll also need to create a custom JpaRepositoryFactoryBean and enable that in your main class.

You can check my code here https://github.com/dzinot/spring-boot-jpa-soft-delete

I suggest you use a database view (or equivalent in Oracle) if you don't want to import hibernate specific annotations. In mySQL 5.5, these views can be updateable and insertable if the filter criteria is as simple as active=1

create or replace view active_stuff as select * from Stuff where active=1;

Whether this is a good idea probably depends on your database but it works great in my implementation.

Undeleting required an additional entity which accessed 'Stuff' directly but then so would @Where

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