9

In my JPanel I have many components, including other JPanels, JLabels, JTextAreas, and JButtons. Becuase I want to implement a tutorial mode where another window appears and everything in my main JPanel is disabled as the new window explains each 'feature' one by one... I want a to know how to disable all the components that are inside my origiinal JPanel. I know you can use:

component.setEnabled(false);

But I don't want to write it for each component in my JPanel. I would like to know if it's possible to disable ALL components within my JPanel with a for loop or something?

Note: There are also component in nested JPanels, like the order would be

Main JPanel ---> Nested JPanel ---> Component

I also want the Final components to also be disabled...

Thanks! All help is appreciated!

3
  • Can you setEnabled(false); on the entire JPanel as a whole? I'm not sure if that works or not.
    – nhgrif
    Oct 11, 2013 at 18:31
  • No it doesn't, I already tried. I believe setEnalbled(false) on a JPanel only disalbes input onto the JPanel itself, such as mouseclicks on the Panel and not the components themselves
    – XQEWR
    Oct 11, 2013 at 18:32
  • Try taking a look at JXLayer/Jlayer Oct 11, 2013 at 19:33

7 Answers 7

11

I used the following function:

void setPanelEnabled(JPanel panel, Boolean isEnabled) {
    panel.setEnabled(isEnabled);

    Component[] components = panel.getComponents();

    for (Component component : components) {
        if (component instanceof JPanel) {
            setPanelEnabled((JPanel) component, isEnabled);
        }
        component.setEnabled(isEnabled);
    }
}
2
  • Should use equals(..) to compare String values and not == Aug 31, 2018 at 16:11
  • This wont work when JLists are inside of the JPanel :S
    – White_King
    Jan 19, 2022 at 19:58
8

Check out Disabled Panel for a couple of solutions.

One uses a disabled GlassPane type of approach and the other recursively disables components while keep track of the components current state so it can be enable properly later.

2
  • Does this keep track of changes made to components between state changes? Ie, I disable the "parent", enable and disable some children and then enable the "parent", will the new states be maintained? Jan 16, 2014 at 23:47
  • @MadProgrammer, no, it assumes no change of state will happen while the panel is disabled (ie. all components remain disabled). So, it just tracks the enabled components at the time the panel is disabled. Only those components will be enabled when the panel is enabled.
    – camickr
    Jan 17, 2014 at 2:26
4

Easy fast way :)

for (Component cp : yourPanle.getComponents() ){
        cp.setEnabled(false);
 }
0
3

JPanel is a Container. Container has a getComponents() method. You should traverse in the component tree recursively.
If the current child is a Container too (instanceof), you can make another recursive call, else you just call setEnabled(false).

2
  • 2
    The danger with this approach is that it ignores the enabled state of the child components. You'd also need to traverse all the child containers as well Oct 11, 2013 at 19:32
  • this won't work for JLists inside of the panels.
    – White_King
    Jan 19, 2022 at 20:08
2

I implemented a solution using JXLayer a little while ago, which uses it's lock effect capabilities to provide a "blocking" layer over the container.

It's based on JXLayer 3.x and uses the filters from JHLabs to generate it's "gray scale" effect

import com.jhlabs.image.GrayscaleFilter;
import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.LayoutManager;
import java.awt.RenderingHints;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import org.jdesktop.jxlayer.JXLayer;
import org.jdesktop.jxlayer.QualityHints;
import org.jdesktop.jxlayer.plaf.BetterBufferedImageOpEffect;
import org.jdesktop.jxlayer.plaf.LayerUI;
import org.jdesktop.jxlayer.plaf.ext.LockableUI;

public class CoreXPane extends JPanel {

    private JXLayer<JPanel> layer;
    private FadedLockUI fadedLockUI;
    private JPanel pnlBody;

    public CoreXPane(LayoutManager layout) {

        super.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
        super.addImpl(getLayer(), BorderLayout.CENTER, 0);

        setLayout(layout);

    }

    public CoreXPane() {

        this(new BorderLayout());

    }

    @Override
    public void setEnabled(boolean enabled) {

        getLockUI().setLocked(!enabled);
        getBodyPane().setEnabled(enabled);
        super.setEnabled(enabled);

    }

    @Override
    protected void addImpl(Component comp, Object constraints, int index) {

        getBodyPane().add(comp, constraints, index);

    }

    @Override
    public void remove(int index) {

        getBodyPane().remove(index);

    }

    @Override
    public void removeAll() {

        getBodyPane().removeAll();

    }

    protected FadedLockUI getLockUI() {

        if (fadedLockUI == null) {

            fadedLockUI = new FadedLockUI();

        }

        return fadedLockUI;

    }

    @Override
    public void invalidate() {

        getLockUI().invalidate();

        super.invalidate();

    }

    @Override
    public void revalidate() {

        getLockUI().revalidate();
        super.revalidate();

    }

    @Override
    public void repaint() {

        getLockUI().repaint();

        super.repaint();

    }

    protected void getLayers(List<LayerUI> layers) {

        layers.add(getLockUI());

    }

    protected JXLayer<JPanel> getLayer() {

        if (layer == null) {

            List<LayerUI> layers = new ArrayList<LayerUI>(4);
            getLayers(layers);

            JComponent wrapper = getBodyPane();
            for (LayerUI ui : layers) {

                wrapper = new JXLayer(wrapper, ui);

            }

            layer = (JXLayer<JPanel>) wrapper;

        }

        return layer;

    }

    @Override
    public void setLayout(LayoutManager mgr) {

        getBodyPane().setLayout(mgr);

    }

    @Override
    public LayoutManager getLayout() {

        return getBodyPane().getLayout();

    }

    public JPanel getBodyPane() {

        if (pnlBody == null) {

            pnlBody = new JPanel();
            pnlBody.setLayout(new BorderLayout());

        }

        return pnlBody;

    }

    @Override
    public void setOpaque(boolean isOpaque) {

        super.setOpaque(isOpaque);
        getBodyPane().setOpaque(isOpaque);

    }

    public static class FadedLockUI extends LockableUI {

        public static Map<RenderingHints.Key, Object> mapRenderHints = new QualityHints();

        public FadedLockUI() {

            setLockedEffects(new BufferedImageOpEffect(new GrayscaleFilter()));

            mapRenderHints.put(RenderingHints.KEY_ALPHA_INTERPOLATION, RenderingHints.VALUE_ALPHA_INTERPOLATION_QUALITY); // okay
            mapRenderHints.put(RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING, RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_ON); // bad
            mapRenderHints.put(RenderingHints.KEY_COLOR_RENDERING, RenderingHints.VALUE_COLOR_RENDER_QUALITY); // okay
            mapRenderHints.put(RenderingHints.KEY_DITHERING, RenderingHints.VALUE_DITHER_ENABLE);
            mapRenderHints.put(RenderingHints.KEY_FRACTIONALMETRICS, RenderingHints.VALUE_FRACTIONALMETRICS_ON);
            mapRenderHints.put(RenderingHints.KEY_INTERPOLATION, RenderingHints.VALUE_INTERPOLATION_BILINEAR);
            mapRenderHints.put(RenderingHints.KEY_RENDERING, RenderingHints.VALUE_RENDER_QUALITY);

        }

        @Override
        protected Map<RenderingHints.Key, Object> getRenderingHints(JXLayer<? extends JComponent> l) {
            return mapRenderHints;
        }

        public void repaint() {
            setDirty(true);
        }

        public void invalidate() {
            setDirty(true);
        }

        public void revalidate() {
            setDirty(true);
        }
    }
}

Take a look at LockableUI for more details

1

I just made a little class that disables everything inside a given Container recursively and later re-enables every Component that was disabled earlier (in the opposite order). It also allows to exclude arbitrary Components from disabling, a feature I added because JLabels look unnecessarily ugly when disabled.

Works like a charm. Since the problem comes up often enough, and I happened to see this post earlier today, here's the class:

import java.awt.*;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

/**
 * Purpose: To recursively disable (and later re-enable) all components of a container, e.g. if you want to clearly show
 * that a program is busy or if you want to prevent clicks and other inputs that piled up meanwhile to affect a window
 * once the program becomes responsive again. Though the solution for that would be simpler: Just disable the window and
 * then, in a SwingUtilities.invokeLater(), re-enable it. This makes sure that before this happens, all input events are
 * eaten.
 */
final public class EverythingDisablerAndReenabler { // v[1, 2016-12-05 14!30 UTC] by dreamspace-president.com

    final private Container rootContainerForWhatShouldBeDisabled;
    final private Class<?>[] componentClassesToBeIgnored;
    final private List<Component> componentsToReenable = new ArrayList<>();

    private boolean disableHasBeenCalled = false; // Order is strictly upheld via IllegalStateException!

    /**
     * @param rootContainerForWhatShouldBeDisabled NOT NULL! The Container whose components are to be recursively
     *                                             disabled. The container itself will not be disabled.
     * @param componentClassesToBeIgnored          null or an array of classes (e.g. containing JLabel.class) that
     *                                             should be excluded from disabling. Adding a Container here does not
     *                                             affect the recursive process.
     * @throws IllegalArgumentException if the container argument is null. In case someone wonders why I don't use
     *                                  {@link NullPointerException} here: Null can be a perfectly legal argument in
     *                                  other places, but here, it is not. If an argument does not check out, the choice
     *                                  of Exception, of course, is IllegalArgument, not NullPointer.
     */
    public EverythingDisablerAndReenabler(final Container rootContainerForWhatShouldBeDisabled, final Class<?>[] componentClassesToBeIgnored) {

        if (rootContainerForWhatShouldBeDisabled == null) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
        this.rootContainerForWhatShouldBeDisabled = rootContainerForWhatShouldBeDisabled;
        this.componentClassesToBeIgnored = componentClassesToBeIgnored;
    }

    /**
     * Disables everything recursively, except the excluded types.
     *
     * @throws IllegalStateException if called twice in a row.
     */
    public void disable() {

        if (disableHasBeenCalled) {
            throw new IllegalStateException();
        }
        disableHasBeenCalled = true;
        componentsToReenable.clear();
        disableEverythingInsideThisHierarchically(rootContainerForWhatShouldBeDisabled);
    }

    /**
     * @throws IllegalStateException if called twice in a row or if disable() had not been called yet.
     */
    public void reenable() {

        if (!disableHasBeenCalled) {
            throw new IllegalStateException();
        }
        disableHasBeenCalled = false;

        for (int i = componentsToReenable.size() - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            componentsToReenable.get(i).setEnabled(true);
        }
        componentsToReenable.clear();
    }

    private void disableEverythingInsideThisHierarchically(final Container container) {

        final Component[] components = container.getComponents();
        for (Component component : components) {

            if (component != null) {

                // RECURSION FIRST
                if (component instanceof Container) {
                    disableEverythingInsideThisHierarchically((Container) component);
                }

                // AND THEN DEAL WITH THE ELEMENTS
                if (component.isEnabled()) {
                    boolean found = false;
                    if (componentClassesToBeIgnored != null) {
                        for (Class<?> cls : componentClassesToBeIgnored) {
                            if (component.getClass() == cls) {
                                found = true;
                                break;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                    if (!found) {
                        component.setEnabled(false);
                        componentsToReenable.add(component);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }


}
1
  • 1
    I realize that "List<Component>" isn't the optimal choice: It should be "List<WeakReference<Component>>" with some tiny adjustments to the reenabler code. This would ensure that unnecessary instances aren't kept around. Jan 8, 2022 at 16:54
0
private void disableComponents(Container panel) {

    for (Component c : panel.getComponents()) {
        if (c instanceof Container)
            disableComponents((Container) c);

        c.setEnabled(false);

        if (c instanceof JTextField || c instanceof JTextArea)
            ((JTextComponent) c).setText("");
        if (c instanceof JXDatePicker)
            ((JXDatePicker) c).setDate(null);
        if (c instanceof JComboBox)
            ((JComboBox) c).setSelectedIndex(-1);
        if (c instanceof JCheckBox)
            ((JCheckBox) c).setSelected(false);
    }
}

 private void enableComponents(Container panel) {

    for (Component c : panel.getComponents()) {
        if (c instanceof Container)
            enableComponents((Container) c);
        c.setEnabled(true);
    }
}

You can call like disableComponents(this); from within your JPanel.

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