35

I am trying to access a local function variable outside the function in Python. So, for example,

bye = ''
def hi():
    global bye
    something
    something
    bye = 5
    sigh = 10

hi()
print bye

The above works fine as it should. Since I want to find out if I can access bye outside hi() without using global bye, I tried:

def hi():
    something
    something
    bye = 5 
    sigh = 10
    return

hi()
x = hi()
print x.bye 

The above gives AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'bye'.

Then, I tried:

def hi():
    something
    something
    bye = 5
    sigh = 10
    return bye 
hi()
x = hi()
print x.bye

This time it doesn't give even an error.

So, is there a way to access a local function variable (bye) outside its function (hi()) without using globals and without printing out variable sigh as well? (Question was edited to include sigh after @hcwhsa 's comment below.

  • 4
    bye = hi();print bye – Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 11 '13 at 19:45
  • 1
    What are you trying to achieve? What is the use case? – Rod Oct 11 '13 at 19:50
  • Thanks @hcwhsa ! This works. A follow-up question. Suppose the function defines more than 1 variable but I want to print just the bye variable. This solution, however, would print both. I'll edit my question accordingly. – askance Oct 11 '13 at 19:53
  • @Rod - My use case involves using the local variable outside the function. At the same time, the function has multiple variables and so, I have included the sigh variable. – askance Oct 11 '13 at 20:01
  • Are you really just interested in learning how to use return or something? – binki Jan 11 '17 at 17:44
81

You could do something along this lines (which worked in both Python v2.7.17 and v3.8.1 when I tested it/them):

def hi():
    # other code...
    hi.bye = 42  # Create function attribute.
    sigh = 10

hi()
print(hi.bye)  # -> 42

Functions are objects in Python and can have arbitrary attributes assigned to them.

If you're going to be doing this kind of thing often, you could implement something more generic by creating a function decorator that adds a this argument to each call to the decorated function.

This additional argument will give functions a way to reference themselves without needing to explicitly embed (hardcode) it into their definition and is similar to the instance argument that class methods automatically receive as their first argument which is usually named self — I picked something different to avoid confusion, but like the self argument, it can be named whatever you wish.

Here's an example of that approach:

def add_this_arg(func):
    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        return func(wrapped, *args, **kwargs)
    return wrapped

@add_this_arg
def hi(this, that):
    # other code...
    this.bye = 2 * that  # Create function attribute.
    sigh = 10

hi(21)
print(hi.bye)  # -> 42
  • 13
    You're welcome, but I must add that this practice is fairly unusual. may be hard to debug, and makes the code hard to maintain -- because essentially it's the same thing as using global variables, and which have long been considered harmful. – martineau Oct 12 '13 at 2:11
  • This do not work if you use it in this way if hi(): print hi.bye. Anyone know why? – m3nda Dec 6 '15 at 19:00
  • 2
    @erm3nda: As defined, the hi() function has no return value, so it effectively returns None which is considered a False value, so the if doesn't execute the conditional print statement. – martineau Dec 6 '15 at 19:27
  • @ReeshabhRanjan: Yes it does. The print hi.bye needs to be changed to print(hi.bye) because of the differences between Python 2 and 3—see Print Is A Function in the What’s New In Python 3.0 document. Since the newer syntax would work in both versions in this particular case, I'll update my answer to avoid confusing folks... – martineau Sep 10 '17 at 15:19
  • @martineau I tried it but it didn't work. Will try again and update you. – Reeshabh Ranjan Sep 10 '17 at 17:35
7

The problem is you were calling print x.bye after you set x as a string. When you run x = hi() it runs hi() and sets the value of x to 5 (the value of bye; it does NOT set the value of x as a reference to the bye variable itself). EX: bye = 5; x = bye; bye = 4; print x; prints 5, not 4

Also, you don't have to run hi() twice, just run x = hi(), not hi();x=hi() (the way you had it it was running hi(), not doing anything with the resulting value of 5, and then rerunning the same hi() and saving the value of 5 to the x variable.

So full code should be

def hi():
    something
    something
    bye = 5
    return bye 
x = hi()
print x

If you wanted to return multiple variables, one option would be to use a list, or dictionary, depending on what you need.

ex:

def hi():
    something
    xyz = { 'bye': 7, 'foobar': 8}
    return xyz
x = hi()
print x['bye']

more on python dictionaries at http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/datastructures.html#dictionaries

  • 1
    Thanks. This is helpful. Though I can't shake the feeling that there is a clean/documented trick to achieve it - to define multiple local variables and then call just one of them outside the function. – askance Oct 11 '13 at 21:42
0

You could do something along this lines:

def static_example():
   if not hasattr(static_example, "static_var"):
       static_example.static_var = 0
   static_example.static_var += 1
   return static_example.static_var

print static_example()
print static_example()
print static_example()
0

I've experienced the same problem. One of the responds to your question led me to the following idea (which worked eventually). I use Python 3.7.

    # just an example 
    def func(): # define a function
       func.y = 4 # here y is a local variable, which I want to access; func.y defines 
                  # a method for my example function which will allow me to access 
                  # function's local variable y
       x = func.y + 8 # this is the main task for the function: what it should do
       return x

    func() # now I'm calling the function
    a = func.y # I put it's local variable into my new variable
    print(a) # and print my new variable

Then I launch this program in Windows PowerShell and get the answer 4. Conclusion: to be able to access a local function's variable one might add the name of the function and a dot before the name of the local variable (and then, of course, use this construction for calling the variable both in the function's body and outside of it). I hope this will help.

-1
 def hi():
     bye = 5
     return bye  

print hi()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.