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Optimizing compiler can rearrange memory access and CPU can execute instructions out of order.

The question is: will separating statements with comma operator guarantee exact order of execution? Or the only way is using memory barriers (which are tricky and non-standart)?

If it won't, than what exactly is guaranted about order of execution of comma separated statements?

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    Nothing. The comma operator is no different from simply two statements separated by ; in this respect. Remember that out-of-order execution is only done when the compiler/CPU can prove that the result will be the same as in-order. – Adam Oct 11 '13 at 22:35
  • Why are you asking? What do you want to achieve? – nosid Oct 11 '13 at 22:38
  • @Adam that could be an answer. – Leushenko Oct 11 '13 at 22:38
  • @nosid I want to achive portable way of ensuring order of execution and/or memory access order. As it turns out, comma is not that way :) – Amomum Oct 11 '13 at 22:44
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    @Amomum: C++11 supports multi-threaded programming. That means there is an easy and portable way to ensure the order of execution (with the as-if rule). Just ask for it. – nosid Oct 11 '13 at 22:50
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The comma operator is no different from simply two statements separated by ; in this respect

The language specifies the semantics of the operator, but the compiler/CPU can choose how they want to implement it. If they can do things out-of-order they are free to, as long as they can prove that the result will be the same as in-order. And they do, often.

If you want guarantees about the actual order for some reason, then you'll have to check your compiler and CPU documentation for how to enforce it. That might mean turning off optimizations, using extra keywords like volatile, use memory fences, etc. However, unless you absolutely positively need in-order, let the compiler and CPU do their thing and give you extra performance at no extra cost to you.

7

The comma operator guarantees that the left side of the expression is evaluated before the right side of the expression within one thread. When the results are stored into memory is entirely unrelated to evaluation order, though, and requires some form of synchronization, e.g. memory barriers.

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No, it will not. Order of execution (as measured by other threads) is guaranteed by the tools that are designed to guarantee order of execution. The comma operator is for discarding the value of the first expression, and is of limited use.

The "as if" rule is king here, and in the absence of barriers, it's construed in a single-threaded context.

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