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I moved a database from SQL Server 2012 to Azure. I don't want to use the user master, so I created a user test. This is what I did for database XXX on Azure:

create user test from login test with default_schema=[dbo]
exec sp_addrolemember 'db_owner','test'

I checked, and the database objects I am interested in are all in the schema dbo. The table Users is in the schema dbo.

The connection string in my web project has test as the login. It produces the error message:

The SELECT permission was denied on the object 'Users', database 'XXX', schema 'dbo'

What does the error message mean and what can I do to let user test access the database XXX?

63

I think the problem is with the user having deny privileges. This error comes when the user which you have created does not have the sufficient privileges to access your tables in the database. Do grant the privilege to the user in order to get what you want.

GRANT the user specific permissions such as SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE on tables in that database.

  • 34
    I had to revoke 'db_denydatareader' and 'db_denydatawriter'. – SaeX Sep 9 '14 at 15:42
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    Sometimes you will be missing db data reader /db owner options ? windowstechinfo.com/2014/09/… – Aravinda Apr 13 '15 at 4:35
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    I had to uncheck 'db_denydatareader' and 'db_denydatawriter' and I guess that is what SaeX means by "revoke". Thanks SaeX. – AH. Oct 14 '16 at 14:21
  • @AH. I had the same problem as you, so I wrote an answer to this question. Check it out if you get a chance – Kolob Canyon Aug 14 '18 at 18:37
23

The syntax to grant select permission is:

USE YourDB;

GRANT SELECT ON dbo.functionName TO UserName;
  • 1
    First time I've done this so I'm not sure if it was correct, but I wanted to Grant select permission for the whole database so I did GRANT SELECT TO UserName and left off the ON clause. It worked. – Rich Mar 2 '18 at 20:49
17

This is how I was able to solve the problem when I faced it

  1. Start SQL Management Studio.
  2. Expand the Server Node (in the 'Object Explorer').
  3. Expand the Databases Node and then expand the specific Database which you are trying to access using the specific user.
  4. Expand the Users node under the Security node for the database.
  5. Right click the specific user and click 'properties'. You will get a dialog box.
  6. Make sure the user is a member of the db_owner group (please read the comments below before you use go this path) and other required changes using the view. (I used this for 2016. Not sure how the specific dialog look like in other version and hence not being specific)
  • 5
    Be careful who you put into the db_owner database role. Not all users should be added to that role. – Rod May 2 '17 at 20:06
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    @Rod If granting the db_owner is not recommended, then which access type is recommended for the application to interact with the database? – Jacob Aug 17 '17 at 22:13
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    Would public suffice? – Rod Aug 22 '17 at 15:25
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    @Jacob To write and read data in any table there id db_datareader and db_datawriter. db_owner also gives permission to modify table definitions. – Oskar Berggren Jun 6 '18 at 8:01
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    This doesn't work if the user has checked db_denydatareade or db_denydatawriter – Kolob Canyon Aug 14 '18 at 18:36
12
  1. Open SQL Management Studio
  2. Expand your database
  3. Expand the "Security" Folder
  4. Expand "Users"
  5. Right click the user (the one that's trying to perform the query)
  6. Make sure you uncheck

    db_denydatareader

    db_denydatawriter

enter image description here

This should go without saying, but only grant the permissions to what the user needs. An easy lazy fix is to check db_owner like I have, but this is not the best security practice.

1

Grant permissions for that user is needed

0

Check space of your database.this error comes when space increased compare to space given to database.

  • Also Change the database Userid and password – Nilesh Jun 24 '15 at 6:13
0

I resolve my problem doing this. [IMPORTANT NOTE: It allows escalated (expanded) privileges to the particular account, possibly more than are needed for individual scenario].

  1. Go to 'Object Explorer' of SQL Management Studio.
  2. Expand Security, then Login.
  3. Select the user you are working with, then right clic and select Properties.
  4. In Select a Page, Go to Server Roles
  5. Clic on sysadmin and save.
  • 1
    Not sure, why this answer was downvoted. This answer solved my problem. So, I have upvoted. – Emran Hussain Mar 5 '18 at 9:08
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    This answer SHOULD be downvoted because it blatantly tells the reader to give the user object full, complete and total control of the entire server without explaining or warning that this is what it does. Based on the wording of the question and this reply, I think there is some danger that novice users will apply this "fix" without understanding fully. – Oskar Berggren Jun 6 '18 at 8:00
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    This is a brute force option that should not be applied. If you don't understand what this is doing then you shouldn't be doing it. – n8. Nov 2 '18 at 22:38
  • Everyone - do not do this in production environment. – gotqn Apr 16 at 12:45
0

Using SSMS, I made sure the user had connect permissions on both the database and ReportServer.

On the specific database being queried, under properties, I mapped their credentials and enabled datareader and public permissions. Also, as others have stated-I made sure there were no denyread/denywrite boxes selected.

I did not want to enable db ownership when for their reports since they only needed to have select permissions.

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