52

I have a string of numbers like so:

example_string = '0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 19, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11'

I would like to convert it to a list:

example_list = [0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 19, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11]

I tried this code:

example_list = []
for x in example_string:
    example_list.append(int(x))

Obviously it does not work, as the string contains spaces and commas. However, even if I remove those, the individual digits of the numbers get converted, giving a result like [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 9, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1].

How can I get the desired result?


See also: How to split a string of space separated numbers into integers? . This question adds a small additional consideration: since int can accept leading and trailing whitespace, there is reason to split on just , rather than , .

The obvious approach to this problem is a common combination of simple tasks:

However, depending on the exact requirements, it can be addressed in other ways. For some cases, the split step may be sufficient on its own. There are other approaches, given in some answers here, to produce different output besides a native Python list - for example, using the standard library array.array, or a NumPy array.

Alternately, the problem can be seen as a special case of How to extract numbers from a string in Python? .

1

6 Answers 6

100

Split on commas, then map to integers:

map(int, example_string.split(','))

Or use a list comprehension:

[int(s) for s in example_string.split(',')]

The latter works better if you want a list result, or you can wrap the map() call in list().

This works because int() tolerates whitespace:

>>> example_string = '0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 19, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11'
>>> list(map(int, example_string.split(',')))  # Python 3, in Python 2 the list() call is redundant
[0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 19, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11]
>>> [int(s) for s in example_string.split(',')]
[0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 19, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11]

Splitting on just a comma also is more tolerant of variable input; it doesn't matter if 0, 1 or 10 spaces are used between values.

3
  • 4
    For the python3, you have to change map(int, example_string.split(',')) to list(map(int, example_string.split(','))).
    – Tengerye
    Commented Sep 13, 2018 at 1:11
  • 1
    @Tengerye: that depends; if you only need an iterable the map() object is fine as it is.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Sep 13, 2018 at 8:34
  • Thanks a million!!!!
    – Emjey
    Commented Dec 5, 2019 at 18:14
14

I guess the dirtiest solution is this:

list(eval('0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 11'))
2
  • If the original string of numbers was stored in "python format", this solution will actually adapt to whatever type of data is stored. '0, 0, 0, 11' will map to int type and '0.12, 0.1, 1.2' will map to float type without having to explicitly code for it.
    – Marcos
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 7:56
  • 3
    It could be dirtier, but it's dirty enough to earn you my downvote. Why even post a horrible solution like that?
    – Aran-Fey
    Commented Jun 3, 2018 at 7:09
7
number_string = '0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 19, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11'

number_string = number_string.split(',')

number_string = [int(i) for i in number_string]
1
  • 1
    Hey Rohit :). Welcome to SO. Do you mind adding a bit explanations to your code? So the next guys coming in have a better idea of what you're doing with your answer :).
    – Patrice
    Commented Oct 8, 2014 at 15:17
7

It should work:

example_string = '0, 0, 0, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 19, 0, 9, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11'
example_list = [int(k) for k in example_string.split(',')]
6

You can also use a list comprehension on split string:

[ int(x) for x in example_string.split(',') ]
2

Try this:

import re
[int(s) for s in re.split('[\s,]+',example_string)]

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