22

I realized that after calling vector.clear() which hold shared pointers, the destructors of the object which own by shared_ptr is not being released.

Code example can be seen below . Even vector.clear() being called, destructor called after shared pointer goes beyond the scope.My question is - do I have to delete all smart pointers inside the vector manually by resetting them? Is there any easier way that you can advice ?

Output :   

constructor
I am here
destructor

Code:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    A(){cout << "constructor" << endl;};
    ~A(){cout << "destructor"  << endl;};
};

int main( )
{
    shared_ptr<A> sharedptr (new A);
    std::vector<shared_ptr<A> > test;
    test.push_back(sharedptr);

    test.clear();
    cout << "I am here" << endl;
}
41

you have two copies of shared_ptr<A> in this case, one is the sharedptr variable and the other as an element in the vector.

do this instead

test.push_back(std::move(sharedptr));

note now the original sharedptr has it's internal moved and no longer usable. The other thing is don't do anything at all, this is a perfectly valid usage of of shared_ptr and sharedptr will clean up itself after it goes out of scope.

  • Your answer is just what I were looking for. Thanks a lot. – Kadir Erdem Demir Oct 12 '13 at 14:10
  • 4
    I would add that in the case shown in the question, I would actually prefer constructing the vector in place in the vector via emplace_back, in order to avoid having an accessible named variable (sharedptr) whose use would be dangerous after std::move. – us2012 Oct 12 '13 at 14:53
6

The problem arises when the push_back adds a copy of the shared_ptr to the vector, leaving the original dangling until main exists. If you don't make the shared_ptr in main scope, the problem does not happen. Just avoid making the shared_ptr in main scope. Make it as a temporary right in the push_back call.

Output is now:   

constructor
I am almost there
destructor
I am here

New code:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
  A(){cout << "constructor" << endl;};
  ~A(){cout << "destructor"  << endl;};
};

int main( )
{
  vector<shared_ptr<A> > test;
  test.push_back(shared_ptr<A>(new A));
  cout << "I am almost there" << endl;
  test.clear();
  cout << "I am here" << endl;
  return 0;
}
  • 2
    what about maked_shared or emplace_back? – GameDeveloper Sep 16 '15 at 15:52
3

Here sharedptr and the element in vector share the same object which will result in invoking constructor and destructor only once.

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