40

In python, is there a way to make a decorator on an abstract method carry through to the derived implementation(s)?

For example, in

import abc

class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = abc.ABCMeta

    @abc.abstractmethod
    @some_decorator
    def my_method(self, x):
        pass

class SubFoo(Foo):
    def my_method(self, x):
        print x

SubFoo's my_method won't get decorated with some_decorator as far as I can tell. Is there some way I can make this happen without having to individually decorate each derived class of Foo?

3
  • 6
    Only with extensive magic, I fear. Is it an alternative to call the abstract method _my_method and have a non-abstract, non-overridden my_method that basically does some_decorator(self._my_method)(*args, **kwds)?
    – user395760
    Commented Oct 12, 2013 at 14:50
  • @delnan Hmm, yeah, I was hoping there might be a solution somewhere between extensive metaclass magic and your good suggestion that's a bit cleaner. But I'll do what I have to do I guess.
    – Ian Hincks
    Commented Oct 12, 2013 at 14:55
  • Have you tried this stackoverflow.com/questions/7196376/… Commented Oct 2, 2019 at 15:06

6 Answers 6

7

I would code it as two different methods just like in standard method factory pattern description.

https://www.oodesign.com/factory-method-pattern.html

class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = abc.ABCMeta

    @abc.abstractmethod
    @some_decorator
    def my_method(self, x):
        self.child_method()

class SubFoo(Foo):
    def child_method(self, x):
        print x
2
  • Sorry I realised that I made a significant mistake in my last comment so I will delete that and rewrite here: What is the point of defining the abstract method here when you've concreted the method anyway? Also, is this Python2?
    – ojunk
    Commented Nov 2, 2022 at 13:31
  • 1
    This does not work.
    – Petar Ulev
    Commented Nov 21, 2022 at 16:34
4

This is, of course, possible. There is very little that can't be done in Python haha! I'll leave whether it's a good idea up to you...

class MyClass:
    def myfunc():
        raise NotImplemented()

    def __getattribute__(self, name):
        if name == "myfunc":
            func = getattr(type(self), "myfunc")
            return mydecorator(func)
        return object.__getattribute__(self, name)

(Not tested for syntax yet, but should give you the idea)

1

As far as I know, this is not possible and not a good strategy in Python. Here's more explanation.

According to the abc documentation:

When abstractmethod() is applied in combination with other method descriptors, it should be applied as the innermost decorator, as shown in the following usage examples: ...

In other words, we could write your class like this (Python 3 style):

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class AbstractClass(metclass=ABCMeta):

    @property
    @abstactmethod
    def info(self):
        pass

But then what? If you derive from AbstractClass and try to override the info property without specifying the @property decorator, that would create a great deal of confusion. Remember that properties (and it's only an example) usually use the same name for their class method, for concision's sake:

class Concrete(AbstractMethod):

    @property
    def info(self):
        return

    @info.setter
    def info(self, new_info):
        new_info

In this context, if you didn't repeat the @property and @info.setter decorators, that would create confusion. In Python terms, that won't work either, properties being placed on the class itself, not on the instance. In other words, I guess it could be done, but in the end, it would create confusing code that's not nearly as easy to read as repeating a few decorator lines, in my opinion.

1

Jinksy's answer did not work for me, but with a small modification it did (I use different names but the idea should be clear):

def my_decorator(func):
    def wrapped(self, x, y):
        print('start')
        result = func(self, x, y)
        print('end')
        return result
    return wrapped
    


class A(ABC):
    @abstractmethod
    def f(self, x, y):
        pass
        
    @my_decorator
    def f_decorated(self, x, y):
        return self.f(x, y)
    

class B(A):
    def f(self, x, y):
        return x + y
    

B().f_decorated(1, 3)
[Out:]
start
end
4   

Notice that the important difference between this and what Jinksy wrote is that the abstract method is f, and when calling B().f_decorated it is the inherited, non-abstract method that gets called.

As I understand it, f_decorated can be properly defined because the abstractmethod decorator is not interfering with the decorator my_decorator.

0

The idea is to have a shadow function that will be used and let the abstract function not have the decorator.

import abc

class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = abc.ABCMeta

    @abc.abstractmethod
    def my_method(self, x):
        pass
    
    @some_decorator
    def _my_method(self, x):
        self.my_method(x)

class SubFoo(Foo):
    def my_method(self, x):
        print x

In this case, use the shadow method _my_method in place instead of my_method when depending on this abstract class.

-1

My solution would be extending the superclass' method without overriding it.

import abc

class Foo(object):
    __metaclass__ = abc.ABCMeta

    @abc.abstractmethod
    @some_decorator
    def my_method(self, x):
        pass

class SubFoo(Foo):
    def my_method(self, x):
        super().my_method(x)  #delegating the call to the superclass
        print x
2
  • 4
    This defeats the purpose of an abstract method. The entire idea of an abstract method is that they MUST be overridden by the subclass. Therefore, you do not call super() on it. In fact, I usually make my abstract methods raise a NotImplementedError in addition to being marked as abstract to make sure that super() is not used.
    – 1313e
    Commented May 3, 2019 at 1:38
  • There's nothing wrong with using the default implementation of an abstract method.
    – chepner
    Commented Sep 17, 2019 at 17:46

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