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I am not too much experienced with c programming. I do not understand what the error is in this code. I have tried it 5 times before putting this code online. Please help. I am implementing a doubly linked list here with two functions to add a node to the list and a function to display the entire list. After successful compilation, If I try to add a node then the program ends unexpectedly.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<malloc.h>
struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node* next;
    struct node* prev;
};
void display_list(struct node* ptr);    
void add_node(struct node* ptr)
{
    if(ptr->next==NULL)
    {
        ptr=(struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
        (ptr->next)->next=NULL;
        (ptr->next)->prev=ptr;
    }
    else        
    {   //traverse the list
        while(ptr->next!=NULL)
        {
            ptr=ptr->next;
        }
        (ptr->next)=(struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
        (ptr->next)->next=NULL;
        (ptr->next)->prev=ptr;
    }
    printf("\nEnter data : ");
    scanf("%d",((ptr->next)->data));
    display_list(ptr);
}
void display_list(struct node* ptr)
{
    if(ptr->next==NULL)
    {
        printf("%d\n",ptr->data);
    }
    else
    {
        //traverse the list and display each node
        while(ptr->next!=NULL)
        {
            printf("%d--->>>---",ptr->data);
            ptr=ptr->next;
        }
            //display last node
        printf("%d",ptr->data);
    }
}
int main()
{
    int choice;
    struct node* start=NULL;
    again:
    printf("\n1) Add node");
    printf("\n2) Display list");
    scanf("%d",&choice);
    if(choice==1)
        add_node(start);
    else if(choice==2)
        display_list(start);
    else 
        goto again;
    return 0;
}
3

In your add_node function, you have an if statement to check if ptr->next is NULL, but you never actually check to see if ptr itself is NULL.

In your main function, you can see that the first time you call add_node, the argument is indeed NULL, and hence the first time in that function, ptr is NULL, and you have issues as soon as your code tries to check ptr->next.


Since you asked nicely in the comments, I'll show you what I meant with the code restructuring.

Right now, your implementation of add_node takes in a struct node * as an argument. The problem with that is when you have something like this:

struct node* ptr = NULL;
add_node(ptr);

even if you modify add_node to properly handle a NULL argument, the value of ptr itself has not changed once add_node returns. One way to do it is to have add_node take a struct node ** instead. Something like this:

void add_node(struct node ** head) {
    struct node * ptr = *head;

    // use ptr like you had before in the old implementation

    *head = ptr; // updating head.
                 // If ptr has changed, this will update head
                 // If it hasn't, then no harm
}

That way, if you have something like

struct node *foo;
add_node(&foo);

that *head = ptr line at the end of add_node will then update the variable with the correct value, and this time foo will have been updated when add_node returns.

  • Dislike of goto aside, there is going to have to be some restructuring of the code to actually fix this, since the first insertion modifies the head of the list. – Dennis Meng Oct 13 '13 at 6:42
  • After modifying add_node and display_list function the display function is printing garbage value.. – pacman7845421 Oct 13 '13 at 6:44
  • @AkashRana Like I said, you need to do some restructuring to properly add that first element. If you have a variable in your main function that is supposed to store a pointer to the head of the list, and just pass that pointer to add_node, the call to add_node doesn't actually change what that variable stores. – Dennis Meng Oct 13 '13 at 6:47
  • @DennisMeng: You may need to rollback that last edit since it has invalidated your answer. – Jamal Oct 13 '13 at 6:51
  • 1
    Yeah, gimme a sec. Also, for future reference, please don't modify a question to address a different issue (it's heavily frowned upon). I'll rollback the question to it's original state. – Dennis Meng Oct 13 '13 at 6:53
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If you replace your line here:

struct node* start=NULL;

with code that creates a root node:

struct node* start = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));

if (start)
{
   start->prev = NULL;
   start->next = NULL;
}

you will be passing a valid node, which can then be 'added to'.

  • 1
    Yes, but that creates an extra node at the beginning that's never used. – Dennis Meng Oct 13 '13 at 7:10
  • @DennisMeng After running code, the display function executed after add_node function displays garbage values output : 3109872--->>>---3962592 and though there is goto statement just after the if statements, the program execution stops, do you think there is also an error in display function – pacman7845421 Oct 13 '13 at 7:14
  • Fair point - although, it might still meets the user's requirement. Depends on whether a redundant root node is a problem in his case... – Baldrick Oct 13 '13 at 7:15
  • @Baldrick Given that the user wants to print out the contents of the list, having one extra value at the beginning would get pretty annoying. – Dennis Meng Oct 13 '13 at 7:17
  • I do not know what is wrong here, by using same style i have successfully implemented singly linked list but doubly linked list is not producing results. – pacman7845421 Oct 13 '13 at 7:26
0

Finally got the answer to this problem causing code here. I have added a comment on the area where the real problem was:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<malloc.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
struct node
{
    int data;
    struct node* next;
    struct node* prev;
};
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

***//now add node function also returns a pointer of type node***

struct node* insert_node(struct node* start,int item)
{
    struct node* new_node=(struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    new_node->data=item;
    //no availabel heap
    if(new_node==NULL)
    {
        printf("\nNo availabel memory!");
        exit(0);
    }
    //if there is no node in the linked list
    if(start==NULL)
    {
        start=new_node;
        start->next=NULL;
        start->prev=NULL;
    }
    //if there is one node in the linked list
    else
    {
        new_node->next=start;
        new_node->prev=NULL;
        start=new_node;             //start now points to new node
    }
    return start;
}
void display_list(struct node* ptr)    //display function has also been modified
{
    struct node* temp=ptr;
    while(temp)
    {
        printf("%d-->>--",temp->data);
        temp=temp->next;
    }
}
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
int main()
{
    int i;
    struct node* start=NULL;
    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        start=insert_node(start,i+1);   //function must return a pointer 
            //because the function uses a copy of the pointer and does not modify the
            //original pointer in the main function
    }
    display_list(start);
    return 0;
}
  • Ah, I see what you did. Also a valid option :) – Dennis Meng Oct 13 '13 at 19:09
0

You are derefencing invalid pointers

    ptr=(struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    (ptr->next)->next=NULL;
    (ptr->next)->prev=ptr;

you create ptr with garbage in it, then you access a member of it ptr->next->next

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