-2

I can't seem to find a solution for this anywhere. Given below is a description of the problem:

Problem Statement

King Kohima has reserved a new exclusive street for his executive class employees where they can build their homes .He has assigned you to plan that street .You have to decide on which plots along the street it is allowed to build new buildings. In order to this, you want to calculate first the number of possible ways of assigning free plots to buildings with the restriction that no two consecutive plots exist on which it is allowed to build - you want to give the inhabitants the feeling that they have more free room so that they can live happily. The street is divided into M sections. Each section corresponds to two plots, one on each side of the street. Find the number of possible assignments.

Input/Output Specs

Input Specs

In the first line you're given M ( 0 < M ≤ 1000 ).

Output Specs You need to output result to variable output1.

Note: In case there is no possible solution, you need to return 0 as output.

Example

Input: 3

Output: 25

Example explanation:

If we just look at the one street side and mark X as a plot where building is allowed and Y as a free plot, we have: XYX, YXY, YYX, XYY, YYY.

Since the same number exists on the other side, we have 5*5 = 25 combinations.

10 Answers 10

4

This question can be solved by Dynamic programming. If we store the count of number of X and number of Y, If the end Character is Y then it results in two strings, by appending X and Y at the end, But if the last character is X, then only one string can be generated by appending Y at the end. This gives the answer

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

public class KingKohima {

public static void main(String[] args) throws NumberFormatException, IOException {
    BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
    int M=Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
    long countX[]=new long[M+1];
    long countY[]=new long[M+1];
    countX[0]=0; countY[0]=0;
    countX[1]=1; countY[1]=1;
    countX[2]=1; countY[2]=2;
    for(int i=3;i<=M;i++){
        countX[i]=countY[i-1];
        countY[i]=countX[i-1]+countY[i-1];
    }
    long finalCount=countX[M]+countY[M];
    System.out.println(finalCount*finalCount);
   }


}
  • This is the best answer so far. Complexity is o(n) – Mandeep Rajpal Sep 22 '15 at 18:03
  • countX[i] is always countY[i-1] so countY[i]=countY[i-2]+countY[i-1] ... its basically a shifted fibonacci sequence and given the constraints one should use BigInteger here if using java ... – Suparshva Jul 9 '17 at 6:14
  • I think this can be solved in O(log n) using the power of the matrix. – 0x6773 Oct 18 '17 at 6:11
2

Use recursion. I am not sure about the time complexity, because for large input it is taking hell lot of time(actually hangs up for large values). For small inputs i.e M < 10, this seems to give answers.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int recur(char c, int num, int N) {
if (num == N) {
    return 1;
}

if (num < N) {
    if (c == 'X') {
        return recur('Y', num + 1, N);
    } else {
        return (recur('X', num + 1, N) + recur('Y', num + 1, N));
    }
}
}

int main()
{
int N = 4;

//x is number of combinations when the first slot is used to build a house
int x = recur('X', 1, N);

//y is number of combinations when the first slot is left empty
int y = recur('Y', 1, N);

cout << "x = " << x << endl;
cout << "y = " << y << endl;

//Since same number exists on other side also
cout << "total = " << (x + y) * (x + y) << endl;

return 0;
}
1

i would suggest a logic behind this. considering X as 1 and Y as 0. 010 101 000 100 001 are the cases where no two 1's are adjacent and sum=5. return result 5*5. So generate binary numbers of 3 bits and increase the count for each such number.

1

This problem is related to Permutations and Combinations especially binomial theorem. Scope is those who good in that, they can get mathemical equation for this problem and then, its easy for any M as input in that equation.

But with coding, python solution can be:

from itertools import product
M = 7 #change as per need
cnt = 0
l = []

for w in product(['x','y'], repeat=M):
    tmp = ''.join(w)
    if 'xx' not in tmp:
        l.append(tmp)
        cnt += 1
print cnt*cnt
print l

output instance:

1156
['xyxyxyx', 'xyxyxyy', 'xyxyyxy', 'xyxyyyx', 'xyxyyyy', 'xyyxyxy', 'xyyxyyx', 'xyyxyyy', 'xyyyxyx', 'xyyyxyy', 'xyyyyxy', 'xyyyyyx', 'xyyyyyy', 'yxyxyxy', 'yxyxyyx', 'yxyxyyy', 'yxyyxyx', 'yxyyxyy', 'yxyyyxy', 'yxyyyyx', 'yxyyyyy', 'yyxyxyx', 'yyxyxyy', 'yyxyyxy', 'yyxyyyx', 'yyxyyyy', 'yyyxyxy', 'yyyxyyx', 'yyyxyyy', 'yyyyxyx', 'yyyyxyy', 'yyyyyxy', 'yyyyyyx', 'yyyyyyy']

So, that solves the problem. If there can be unexpected output for large M, please post comment.

0

If we have multiple test cases, then use this solution:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.util.HashMap;

public class KohimaKing {

    static HashMap<Integer,BigInteger> fibboTerm = new HashMap<Integer,BigInteger>();
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception

    {
        fibboTerm.put(new Integer(0),new BigInteger("0"));
        fibboTerm.put(new Integer(1),new BigInteger("2"));
        fibboTerm.put(new Integer(2),new BigInteger("3"));
        Integer i=new Integer(3);
        for(;i<=1000;i++)
        {
            fibboTerm.put(i, fibboTerm.get(i-2).add(fibboTerm.get(i-1)));
        }


        BufferedReader br= new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        System.out.println("Enter sections");
        int m = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
        System.out.println(fibboTerm.get(m).multiply(fibboTerm.get(m)));

    }   
}
0

I think recursion would be the best solution to this problem. My idea is to think about a tree which can be formed with depth M, At last count the number of leaf nodes in the tree. That's just an idea, Actual recursion can be started by thinking whether the first place can take X or not. It can take both X & Y only if it's parent(previous plot) has taken Y. But if it's parent has taken X, it can only take Y. With this idea i made a recursion like.

int count=0; //Maintain a global counter to count the leaves
void fun(bool xTaken, int M)

{

     if(M==0)
     {
        count++; //We've reached the leaf
        return;
     }

     if(xTaken==false)
     {
        //We can take X
        fun(true,M-1);

        //or we can take Y
        fun(false,M-1);
     }

     else if(xTaken==true)
     {
        //We can only take Y
        fun(false,M-1);
     }

}

And our answer will be count*count. Again we can optimize this recursion by taking care of duplicate recursions by using memoization

0

I think, this formula might give the answer to the problem

For M sections, Total number of possible combinations of X and Y are 2^M, but we have to deduct the cases where 1) Two X are together 2) Three X are together 3) Four X are together and so on...till M X's are together.

Count = 2^M - (1! + 2! + 3!.........M-1!)

Final Answer = Count*Count

0

I'm not sure if this is the most efficient solution, but here goes For a given value m, the total number of required arrangements are:

r=1;sum=0;

while(m>=r)
{

    sum+=mCr;

    m--;

    r++;

}

for example, if m=7 ans= 7C1 + 6C2 + 5C3 + 4C4 ;

0
package HackerRank;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.Scanner;

class Tester1KingKohm {
    public static void plotmaker(int input) {
        int i = 1;
        int countx = 1;
        int county = 1;
        while (i <= input) {
            if (i > 1) {
                int tempx = countx;
                countx = county;
                county = tempx + county;
            }
            i++;
        }
        System.out.println(countx + " " + county);
        int total = countx + county;
        int bothsidetotal = total * total;
        System.out.println(bothsidetotal);

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws NumberFormatException, IOException {
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        plotmaker(sc.nextInt());
    }
}
-1
import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.util.HashMap;

public class KingKohima 
{

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception

    {
        BigInteger a = new BigInteger("2");
        BigInteger b = new BigInteger("3");
        BigInteger result = new BigInteger("0");


        BufferedReader br= new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        int m = Integer.parseInt(br.readLine());
        if(m<=0)
        {
            System.out.println("0");
        }
        else if(m==1)
        {
            System.out.println("2");
        }
        else if(m==2)
        {
            System.out.println("3");
        }
        else
        {
            Integer i=new Integer(3);

            for(;i<=m;i++)
            {
                result = a.add(b);
                a=new BigInteger(b.toString());
                b=new BigInteger(result.toString());

            }
        }

        System.out.println(result.multiply(result));

    }

}
  • for m=3 there are 5 combination for single side of road as described in problem , Similarly for m=4 there are 8 combination. so on it will be a fibbonacci series 5,8,13,21 ...... . – Maninder Singh Apr 24 '15 at 13:04

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