162

I have the following variable.

echo "|$COMMAND|"

which returns

|
REBOOT|

How can I remove that first newline?

0

11 Answers 11

163

Under , there are some bashisms:

The tr command could be replaced by // bashism:

COMMAND=$'\nREBOOT\r   \n'
echo "|${COMMAND}|"
|
   OOT
|

echo "|${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n']}|"
|REBOOT   |

echo "|${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n ']}|"
|REBOOT|

See Parameter Expansion and QUOTING in bash's man page:

man -Pless\ +/\/pattern bash
man -Pless\ +/\\\'string\\\' bash

man -Pless\ +/^\\\ *Parameter\\\ Exp bash
man -Pless\ +/^\\\ *QUOTING bash

Further...

As asked by @AlexJordan, this will suppress all specified characters. So what if $COMMAND do contain spaces...

COMMAND=$'         \n        RE BOOT      \r           \n'
echo "|$COMMAND|"
|
           BOOT      
|

CLEANED=${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n']}
echo "|$CLEANED|"
|                 RE BOOT                 |

shopt -q extglob || { echo "Set shell option 'extglob' on.";shopt -s extglob;}

CLEANED=${CLEANED%%*( )}
echo "|$CLEANED|"
|                 RE BOOT|

CLEANED=${CLEANED##*( )}
echo "|$CLEANED|"
|RE BOOT|

Shortly:

COMMAND=$'         \n        RE BOOT      \r           \n'
CLEANED=${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n']} && CLEANED=${CLEANED%%*( )}
echo "|${CLEANED##*( )}|"
|RE BOOT|

Note: have extglob option to be enabled (shopt -s extglob) in order to use *(...) syntax.

8
  • 1
    This is the way to strip linefeeds from a variable in BASH. Other answers are needlessly invoking an extra TR process. BTW, it has the added benefit of removing ending spaces!
    – ingyhere
    Nov 12, 2015 at 21:06
  • 2
    Note that it also removes internal spaces from a string as well... COMMAND="RE BOOT"; echo "|${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n ']}|" returns |REBOOT| Mar 16, 2016 at 11:48
  • 2
    @AlexJordan Yes, it's a wanted feature: You could whipe the space after \n to prevent this: COMMAND="RE BOOT"; echo "|${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n']}|" will return |RE BOOT|. Mar 16, 2016 at 22:01
  • 3
    How is the pattern working in ${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n']}? I thought ${COMMAND//[\t\r\n]} would simply work, but it didn't. What is the $ symbol for and the single quotes too?
    – haridsv
    May 11, 2017 at 7:43
  • 1
    Regarding the $'' syntax, that's ANSI C quoting (mentioned in wjordans answer).
    – chuckx
    Apr 19, 2018 at 17:55
106
echo "|$COMMAND|"|tr '\n' ' '

will replace the newline (in POSIX/Unix it's not a carriage return) with a space.

To be honest I would think about switching away from bash to something more sane though. Or avoiding generating this malformed data in the first place.

Hmmm, this seems like it could be a horrible security hole as well, depending on where the data is coming from.

10
  • The date is coming from a curl request which is on the same server, How would i go about putting that into a new var ? newvar=$(echo "|$COMMAND|"|tr '\n' ' ') Oct 13, 2013 at 13:46
  • 2
    Yes. But please tell me you're not allowing arbitrary people to reboot your server remotely without a password... Oct 13, 2013 at 13:49
  • 49
    Why did you not use tr -d '\n' for dropping instead of replace by a space Oct 13, 2013 at 16:20
  • 4
    Please whipe useless pipes! Use tr '\n' ' ' <<< "|$COMMAND|" instead of echo ... | ... Oct 13, 2013 at 16:24
  • 13
    @F.Hauri: or useless tr's: "|${COMMAND//$'\n'}|"
    – rici
    Oct 13, 2013 at 18:39
98

Clean your variable by removing all the linefeeds:

COMMAND=$(echo $COMMAND|tr -d '\n')
4
  • 26
    Doesn't that strip linefeeds? Shouldn't it be tr -d '\r' instead?
    – Izzy
    Nov 17, 2014 at 22:30
  • 3
    Echoing an uncommented variable removes all IFS characters (newline, space, tab by default). So if you're going to do this, you should be aware that all IFS characters are dropped, and you don't need the tr. Simply COMMAND=$(echo $COMMAND) will give a similar effect. Which is, presumably, devil spawn as it invokes a new process, but it's still pretty short and sweet for the human's eyes and if you have a second or two to spare in your life you may be willing to take the hit :-) .
    – Mike S
    Dec 27, 2016 at 22:38
  • 1
    I've updated the question to say "linefeed", as its example did show that it was a linefeed, not a carriage return. This answer is still correct, but should maybe be updated to say "linefeed" instead of "carriage return"? Aug 7, 2018 at 14:14
  • 1
    should have been the accepted answer combined with bash specific ${COMMAND//[$'\t\r\n']}
    – Summer-Sky
    Nov 10, 2021 at 16:36
14

Using bash:

echo "|${COMMAND/$'\n'}|"

(Note that the control character in this question is a 'newline' (\n), not a carriage return (\r); the latter would have output REBOOT| on a single line.)

Explanation

Uses the Bash Shell Parameter Expansion ${parameter/pattern/string}:

The pattern is expanded to produce a pattern just as in filename expansion. Parameter is expanded and the longest match of pattern against its value is replaced with string. [...] If string is null, matches of pattern are deleted and the / following pattern may be omitted.

Also uses the $'' ANSI-C quoting construct to specify a newline as $'\n'. Using a newline directly would work as well, though less pretty:

echo "|${COMMAND/
}|"

Full example

#!/bin/bash
COMMAND="$'\n'REBOOT"
echo "|${COMMAND/$'\n'}|"
# Outputs |REBOOT|

Or, using newlines:

#!/bin/bash
COMMAND="
REBOOT"
echo "|${COMMAND/
}|"
# Outputs |REBOOT|
0
11

Adding answer to show example of stripping multiple characters including \r using tr and using sed. And illustrating using hexdump.

In my case I had found that a command ending with awk print of the last item |awk '{print $2}' in the line included a carriage-return \r as well as quotes.

I used sed 's/["\n\r]//g' to strip both the carriage-return and quotes.

I could also have used tr -d '"\r\n'.

Interesting to note sed -z is needed if one wishes to remove \n line-feed chars.

$ COMMAND=$'\n"REBOOT"\r   \n'

$ echo "$COMMAND" |hexdump -C
00000000  0a 22 52 45 42 4f 4f 54  22 0d 20 20 20 0a 0a     |."REBOOT".   ..|

$ echo "$COMMAND" |tr -d '"\r\n' |hexdump -C
00000000  52 45 42 4f 4f 54 20 20  20                       |REBOOT   |

$ echo "$COMMAND" |sed 's/["\n\r]//g' |hexdump -C
00000000  0a 52 45 42 4f 4f 54 20  20 20 0a 0a              |.REBOOT   ..|

$ echo "$COMMAND" |sed -z 's/["\n\r]//g' |hexdump -C
00000000  52 45 42 4f 4f 54 20 20  20                       |REBOOT   |

And this is relevant: What are carriage return, linefeed, and form feed?

  • CR == \r == 0x0d
  • LF == \n == 0x0a
10

What worked for me was echo $testVar | tr "\n" " "

Where testVar contained my variable/script-output

5

If you are using bash with the extglob option enabled, you can remove just the trailing whitespace via:

shopt -s extglob
COMMAND=$'\nRE BOOT\r   \n'
echo "|${COMMAND%%*([$'\t\r\n '])}|"

This outputs:

|
RE BOOT|

Or replace %% with ## to replace just the leading whitespace.

1
  • 1
    This worked like a charm with some weird output I got from a docker command. Much thanks!
    – develCuy
    Jul 31, 2018 at 5:54
5

You can simply use echo -n "|$COMMAND|".

$ man echo

-n do not output the trailing newline

2

To address one possible root of the actual issue, there is a chance you are sourcing a crlf file.

CRLF Example:

.env (crlf)

VARIABLE_A="abc"
VARIABLE_B="def"

run.sh

#!/bin/bash
source .env
echo "$VARIABLE_A"
echo "$VARIABLE_B"
echo "$VARIABLE_A $VARIABLE_B"

Returns:

abc
def
 def

If however you convert to LF:

.env (lf)

VARIABLE_A="abc"
VARIABLE_B="def"

run.sh

#!/bin/bash
source .env
echo "$VARIABLE_A"
echo "$VARIABLE_B"
echo "$VARIABLE_A $VARIABLE_B"

Returns:

abc
def
abc def
1
  • 1
    Thank you for this, I've been pulling my hairs on this for a while wondering why variable substitution was messing my string. Was using a CRLF file on linux...
    – yonicsurny
    Mar 16, 2021 at 10:21
1

Short answers are the best (please upwote) Use this bashism if you don't want spawn processes like (tr, sed or awk) for such a simple task, bash can do that alone:

COMMAND=${COMMAND//$'\n'/}

From the Documentation:

${FOO//from/to} Replace all
${FOO/from/to}  Replace first match

Thanks for upwoting. This is the best answer.

0

Grep can be used to filter out any blank lines. This is useful if you have several lines of data and want to remove any empty.

echo "$COMMAND" | grep .

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