In my unit tests, I'm trying to dynamically wrap an event, so that I can inject some test code before forwarding to the actual handler. This is what I have now:

Delegate handler = // the original method handler
object myObject = // the original object

EventInfo ei = myObject.GetType().GetEvent("MyEvent");
Delegate d = GenerateWrappedDelegate(ei);
ei.AddEventHandler(myObject, d);

...

private GenerateWrappedDelegate(EventInfo eventInfo)
{
    var eventHandlerType = eventInfo.EventHandlerType;
    int arity = eventHandlerType.GetMethod("Invoke").GetParameters().Count();
    var methodName = string.Format("Arity{0}", arity);
    var eventRegisterMethod = typeof(EventMonitor).GetMethod(methodName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance);
    return Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventHandlerType, this, eventRegisterMethod);
}

private void Arity1(object arg1)
{
    Handle(() => handler.DynamicInvoke(arg1));
}

private void Arity2(object arg1, object arg2)
{
    Handle(() => handler.DynamicInvoke(arg1, arg2));
}

private void Handle(Action action)
{
    // Do something interesting here, before the original event handler is called
    action();
}

I have a fair bunch of these Arity methods, because I don't know in advance how many parameters my event will have, and I want to pass them all on to the original delegate.

All this works fine if my event handler delegates look like this:

public delegate void MyDelegate(object sender, EventArgs e);
public event MyDelegate MyEvent;

However, some of the delegates in our code base don't look like 'traditional' event handlers, but more something like this:

public delegate void MyOtherDelegate(object sender, int updatedValue);
public event MyOtherDelegate MyOtherEvent;

And then, my code suddenly doesn't work anymore; it fails on the int.

I've worked around this problem by adding a convoluted if statement in GenerateWrappedDelegate and added Arity methods, like this:

private void Arity2oo(object arg1, object arg2)
{
    Handle(() => handler.DynamicInvoke(arg1, arg2));
}

private void Arity2oi(object arg1, int arg2)
{
    Handle(() => handler.DynamicInvoke(arg1, arg2));
}

But that obviously doesn't scale very well, and it's painfully redundant.

I've been looking into generating dynamic methods as described here, but this confuses me even more. I'm not familiar with MSIL, and I wouldn't know how to generate a method body that loads all parameters, based on their run-time type, and call DynamicInvoke with each of them. I imagine it wouldn't look pretty.

We're using .NET 4.0, so I've been looking into dynamic as well, but I haven't been able to figure out a way to make that work, either.

I'm out of ideas. Do you have any?

  • Can the private void Handle(Action action) be static? If so, I've a rather simple solution for you. Otherwise, I think generating IL is unavoidable. – Eli Arbel Oct 13 '13 at 14:28
  • @EliArbel Sure, with a little tweaking I can probably make it static! – jqno Oct 13 '13 at 14:33
  • I thought of something else. Have a look. – Eli Arbel Oct 13 '13 at 16:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code fails on int because covariance/contravariance in .NET doesn't work with value types (which would have to be boxed). You can solve this immediate problem using generics:

private GenerateWrappedDelegate(EventInfo eventInfo)
{
  var eventHandlerType = eventInfo.EventHandlerType;
  var parameters = eventHandlerType.GetMethod("Invoke").GetParameters();
  var methodName = string.Format("Arity{0}", parameters.Length);
  var eventRegisterMethod = typeof(EventMonitor)
        .GetMethod(methodName, BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
        .MakeGenericMethod(parameters.Select(p => p.ParameterType).ToArray());

  return Delegate.CreateDelegate(eventHandlerType, this, eventRegisterMethod);
}

private void Arity1<T>(T arg1)
{
  Handle(() => handler.DynamicInvoke(arg1));
}

private void Arity2<T1, T2>(T1 arg1, T2 arg2)
{
  Handle(() => handler.DynamicInvoke(arg1, arg2));
}

While this doesn't cover all possible delegates (for example, ref/out parameters would require separate overloads) I suspect it's highly unlikely that you'd encounter events with such signatures.

  • So simple and elegant; I wish I would've thought of this myself :). Thanks! And I agree with the ref/out parameters. – jqno Oct 13 '13 at 19:47

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