3

After asking Is there a faster heap allocation/deallocation mechanism available than boost::object_pool? I got feedback that this object pool is NOT thread safe.

So I wrote an ObjectFactory wrapping boost::object_pool and adding mutex locks:

#include <memory>
using std::shared_ptr;

#include <boost/pool/object_pool.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/mutex.hpp>

template <typename T>
class ObjectFactory 
{
private:
    struct SharedDeleter 
    {
        ObjectFactory<T>* m_pFact;

        SharedDeleter(ObjectFactory<T>* fact) : m_pFact(fact) {}

        inline void operator()(T* p) const 
        {      
          m_pFact->destroy(p);
        }
    };


    boost::object_pool<T>   m_Pool;
    boost::mutex            m_PoolMutex;

    SharedDeleter           m_Deleter;


public:
    ObjectFactory() : m_Deleter(this)
    {
    }

    template<typename TType = T, typename... TArgs> 
    inline TType* create(TArgs&&... mArgs)
    {
        boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> scoped_lock(m_PoolMutex);
        return m_Pool.construct(mArgs...);
    }

    inline void destroy(T* mObj) 
    { 
        boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> scoped_lock(m_PoolMutex);
        m_Pool.destroy(mObj); 
    }


    template<typename TType = T, typename... TArgs> 
    inline std::shared_ptr<TType> make_shared(TArgs&&... mArgs)
    {
        return std::shared_ptr<TType>(this->create(mArgs...), m_Deleter);
    }

};

Timing results without the mutex lock:

 With WithObjectFactory!: 
Start time: 1381682855810868000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381682863375427000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 7.56456 seconds

 With WithObjectFactory and std::shared_ptr!: 
Start time: 1381682863375476000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381682879114065000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 15.7386 seconds

Timing results WITH the mutex locks:

 With WithObjectFactory!: 
Start time: 1381683562246086000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381683574399319000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 12.1532 seconds

 With WithObjectFactory and std::shared_ptr!: 
Start time: 1381683574399378000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381683595103438000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 20.7041 seconds

What you see is that the mutex locking takes more than 20% of the time leaving, IMHO, boost::object_pool only usable for single thread applications.

My questions: Am I using the proper locking mechanism? Does the destroy also needs a mutex lock? Is there any bug I am not seeing in above code?

Thanks

EDIT: Tested with std::map but is to slow. Found boost::thread_specific_ptr and it seems to work:

#include <memory>
using std::shared_ptr;

#include <boost/pool/object_pool.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

template <typename T>
class ObjectFactory 
{
private:
    struct SharedDeleter 
    {
        ObjectFactory<T>* m_pFact;

        SharedDeleter(ObjectFactory<T>* fact) : m_pFact(fact) {}

        inline void operator()(T* p) const 
        {      
          m_pFact->destroy(p);
        }
    };

    boost::thread_specific_ptr<boost::object_pool<T>>   m_tpPool;   
    SharedDeleter           m_Deleter;

public:
    ObjectFactory() : m_Deleter(this)
    {
        if ( !m_tpPool.get() )
            m_tpPool.reset(new boost::object_pool<T>());
    }

    template<typename TType = T, typename... TArgs> 
    inline TType* create(TArgs&&... mArgs)
    {
        return m_tpPool->construct(mArgs...);
    }

    inline void destroy(T* mObj) 
    { 
        m_tpPool->destroy(mObj);
    }

    template<typename TType = T, typename... TArgs> 
    inline std::shared_ptr<TType> make_shared(TArgs&&... mArgs)
    {
        return std::shared_ptr<TType>(this->create(mArgs...), m_Deleter);
    }
};

Results with above code:

 With WithObjectFactory!: 
Start time: 1381714923605177000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381714934202228000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 10.5971 seconds

 With WithObjectFactory and std::shared_ptr!: 
Start time: 1381714934202285000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381714950900537000 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 16.6983 seconds
  • 1
    using a simple spin lock (instead of a full blown mutex) may give some speed up, but essentially you have contention on the lock in any case. If you're likely to have contention on the object pool (destroy and construct methods), then locking will not help. The only possilibity is an implementation using atomic operations (but not for locks...). – Walter Oct 13 '13 at 17:42
  • 2
    The solution used by most thread safe memory managers is thread local arenas so that you only get contention in the global arena when the thread local ones need more memory. The alternative with allocators is to just stick to a separate arena per single threaded object. Then it won't matter if it is thread safe. – John5342 Oct 13 '13 at 19:17
  • Would std::map<boost::thread::id, ObjectFactory<T>> work together with mutex in an Static ObjectFactoryBuilder class? – Henry Roeland Oct 13 '13 at 20:56
  • 1
    @Henry Roeland - The problem with with map approach is that you'd need to manage the thread::id keys yourself (e.g. clean them up when threads exit), as well as synchronization of the map itself (likely guarded with a reader/writer lock). – Bukes Oct 14 '13 at 3:01
  • I think better idea is to use singleton_pool if you want thread sefty in case of concurrent programming. – rahul.deshmukhpatil Dec 23 '15 at 15:30
1
  • Using std::mutex and boost:thread_specific_ptr where both to slow
  • std::atomic_load(std::shared_ptr<...>*) does NOT seem to work on GCC 4.6
  • Fallback to good old pthread calls using this solution

Results: On Ubuntu LTS 12.04 with GCC 4.6

 With OUT smartptrs (new and delete): 
Start time: 1381746876399819258 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746881851990579 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 5.45217 seconds

 With smartptrs (boost::shared_ptr withOUT make_shared): 
Start time: 1381746881852079492 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746889453586405 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 7.60151 seconds

 With smartptrs (boost::shared_ptr with make_shared): 
Start time: 1381746889453642790 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746896396534068 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 6.94289 seconds

 With STD smart_ptr (std::shared_ptr with make_shared): 
Start time: 1381746896396596314 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746902544346880 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 6.14775 seconds

 With UniquePtr (boost::unique_ptr): 
Start time: 1381746902544386766 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746907842640751 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 5.29825 seconds

 With STD UniquePtr (std::unique_ptr): 
Start time: 1381746907842679994 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746913141429138 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 5.29875 seconds

 With Object Pool (boost::object_pool<>): 
Start time: 1381746913141469017 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746917062689541 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 3.92122 seconds


 With Thread Safe ObjectFactory<TestClass>...
Start time: 1381746917062729671 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746921388452186 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 4.32572 seconds

 With Thread Safe ObjectFactory<TestClass> and std::shared_ptr...
Start time: 1381746921388491395 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
End time: 1381746928808481617 nanoseconds since Jan 1, 1970
Duration: 7.41999 seconds

So the Thread Safe ObjectFactory is still 1+ second faster than using plain old new & delete.

Anyone have a beter suggestion please add it!

Thanks for all the helpfull feedback!

EDIT: Using __thread gnu option also works fast:

#include <memory>
#include <boost/pool/object_pool.hpp>

template <typename T>
class ObjectFactory 
{
private:
    struct SharedDeleter 
    {
        ObjectFactory<T>* m_pFact;

        SharedDeleter(ObjectFactory<T>* fact) : m_pFact(fact) {}

        inline void operator()(T* p) const 
        {      
          m_pFact->destroy(p);
        }
    };

    static __thread boost::object_pool<T>* m_tlsPool;
    SharedDeleter           m_Deleter;

public:
    ObjectFactory() :  m_Deleter(this)
    {
        m_tlsPool = new boost::object_pool<T>();
    }

    virtual ~ObjectFactory() 
    {
        delete m_tlsPool;
    }

    template<typename TType = T, typename... TArgs> 
    inline TType* create(TArgs&&... mArgs)
    {
        return m_tlsPool->construct(mArgs...);       
    }

    inline void destroy(T* mObj) 
    { 
        m_tlsPool->destroy(mObj);
    }

    template<typename TType = T, typename... TArgs> 
    inline std::shared_ptr<TType> make_shared(TArgs&&... mArgs)
    {
        return std::shared_ptr<TType>(this->create(mArgs...), m_Deleter);
    }
};

template<typename T>
/*static*/__thread boost::object_pool<T>* ObjectFactory<T>::m_tlsPool(NULL);

However m_tlsPool does not need to be static?

  • 1
    It's worth noting that gcc's (and by extension clang's) __thread does not call destructors so you would have to track the instances and garbage collect them once you know the thread has ended. thread_local, which handles that for you, is available in later versions of gcc and clang. – John5342 Oct 14 '13 at 13:22
0

I think you would still need synchronization for the m_Deleter since the shared_ptr could be released from another thread.

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