8

I have know my current position({lat:x,lon:y}) and I know my speed and direction angle; How to predict next position at next time?

8

First, calculate the distance you will travel based on your current speed and your known time interval ("next time"):

distance = speed * time

Then you can use this formula to calculate your new position (lat2/lon2):

lat2 =asin(sin(lat1)*cos(d)+cos(lat1)*sin(d)*cos(tc))
dlon=atan2(sin(tc)*sin(d)*cos(lat1),cos(d)-sin(lat1)*sin(lat2))
lon2=mod( lon1-dlon +pi,2*pi )-pi

For an implementation in Javascript, see the function LatLon.prototype.destinationPoint on this page

Update for those wishing a more fleshed-out implementation of the above, here it is in Javascript:

  /**
  * Returns the destination point from a given point, having travelled the given distance
  * on the given initial bearing.
  *
  * @param   {number} lat - initial latitude in decimal degrees (eg. 50.123)
  * @param   {number} lon - initial longitude in decimal degrees (e.g. -4.321)
  * @param   {number} distance - Distance travelled (metres).
  * @param   {number} bearing - Initial bearing (in degrees from north).
  * @returns {array} destination point as [latitude,longitude] (e.g. [50.123, -4.321])
  *
  * @example
  *     var p = destinationPoint(51.4778, -0.0015, 7794, 300.7); // 51.5135°N, 000.0983°W
  */
  function destinationPoint(lat, lon, distance, bearing) {
     var radius = 6371e3; // (Mean) radius of earth

     var toRadians = function(v) { return v * Math.PI / 180; };
     var toDegrees = function(v) { return v * 180 / Math.PI; };

     // sinφ2 = sinφ1·cosδ + cosφ1·sinδ·cosθ
     // tanΔλ = sinθ·sinδ·cosφ1 / cosδ−sinφ1·sinφ2
     // see mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/52049.html for derivation

     var δ = Number(distance) / radius; // angular distance in radians
     var θ = toRadians(Number(bearing));

     var φ1 = toRadians(Number(lat));
     var λ1 = toRadians(Number(lon));

     var sinφ1 = Math.sin(φ1), cosφ1 = Math.cos(φ1);
     var sinδ = Math.sin(δ), cosδ = Math.cos(δ);
     var sinθ = Math.sin(θ), cosθ = Math.cos(θ);

     var sinφ2 = sinφ1*cosδ + cosφ1*sinδ*cosθ;
     var φ2 = Math.asin(sinφ2);
     var y = sinθ * sinδ * cosφ1;
     var x = cosδ - sinφ1 * sinφ2;
     var λ2 = λ1 + Math.atan2(y, x);

     return [toDegrees(φ2), (toDegrees(λ2)+540)%360-180]; // normalise to −180..+180°
  }
  • thank you very much! It really works – jtyjty99999 Oct 14 '13 at 17:58
  • 1
    Here what is the value of tc, – kks Jan 14 '15 at 13:58
  • tc is the radial bearing, i.e tc = brngInDegrees.toRadians(); - see destinationPoint() here where θ == tc – DaveAlden Jan 14 '15 at 15:00
  • 4
    The accepted answer is the worst of all. Nothing is defined, nor any units. lat1 must be in radians, which must be stated, d is what? – AlexWien Jan 14 '15 at 16:05
7

Here in JS for calculating lat and lng given bearing and distance:

//lat, lng in degrees. Bearing in degrees. Distance in Km
calculateNewPostionFromBearingDistance = function(lat, lng, bearing, distance) {
  var R = 6371; // Earth Radius in Km

  var lat2 = Math.asin(Math.sin(Math.PI / 180 * lat) * Math.cos(distance / R) + Math.cos(Math.PI / 180 * lat) * Math.sin(distance / R) * Math.cos(Math.PI / 180 * bearing));
  var lon2 = Math.PI / 180 * lng + Math.atan2(Math.sin( Math.PI / 180 * bearing) * Math.sin(distance / R) * Math.cos( Math.PI / 180 * lat ), Math.cos(distance / R) - Math.sin( Math.PI / 180 * lat) * Math.sin(lat2));

  return [180 / Math.PI * lat2 , 180 / Math.PI * lon2];
};

calculateNewPostionFromBearingDistance(60,25,30,1)
[60.007788047871614, 25.008995333937197]
1

Same code in Java:

    final double r = 6371 * 1000; // Earth Radius in m

    double lat2 = Math.asin(Math.sin(Math.toRadians(lat)) * Math.cos(distance / r)
            + Math.cos(Math.toRadians(lat)) * Math.sin(distance / r) * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(bearing)));
    double lon2 = Math.toRadians(lon)
            + Math.atan2(Math.sin(Math.toRadians(bearing)) * Math.sin(distance / r) * Math.cos(Math.toRadians(lat)), Math.cos(distance / r)
            - Math.sin(Math.toRadians(lat)) * Math.sin(lat2));
    lat2 = Math.toDegrees( lat2);
    lon2 = Math.toDegrees(lon2);
1

This code works for me :
1. We have to count the distance ( speed * time ).
2. The code converts the distance to KM because earthradius is used in KM too.

            const double radiusEarthKilometres = 6371.01f;

            kmDistance = kmSpeed * (timer1.Interval / 1000f) / 3600f;

            var distRatio = kmDistance / radiusEarthKilometres;
            var distRatioSine = Math.Sin(distRatio);
            var distRatioCosine = Math.Cos(distRatio);

            var startLatRad = deg2rad(lat0);
            var startLonRad = deg2rad(lon0);

            var startLatCos = Math.Cos(startLatRad);
            var startLatSin = Math.Sin(startLatRad);

            var endLatRads = Math.Asin((startLatSin * distRatioCosine) + (startLatCos * distRatioSine * Math.Cos(angleRadHeading)));

            var endLonRads = startLonRad
                + Math.Atan2(Math.Sin(angleRadHeading) * distRatioSine * startLatCos,
                    distRatioCosine - startLatSin * Math.Sin(endLatRads));

            newLat = rad2deg(endLatRads);
            newLong = rad2deg(endLonRads);
  • nice code, but I'm not understanding "lat0" and "lon0". Do you literally mean the North Pole? or are these meant to be the beginning latitude and longitude? Thx. – globalSchmidt Jul 8 '18 at 20:42
  • 1
    its the beginning of latitude and longitude – faruk Jul 8 '18 at 22:14
  • Awesome. Thank you! – globalSchmidt Jul 8 '18 at 22:17
0

Based on the answer of @clody96 and @mike, here is an implementation in R using a data.frame with velocity and timesteps instead of distance:

points = data.frame(
  lon = seq(11, 30, 1),
  lat = seq(50, 59.5, 0.5),
  bea = rep(270, 20),
  time = rep(60,20),
  vel = runif(20,1000, 3000)
)

## lat, lng in degrees. Bearing in degrees. Distance in m
calcPosBear = function(df) {
  earthR = 6371000; 

  ## Units meter, seconds and meter/seconds
  df$dist = df$time * df$vel

  lat2 = asin(sin(
     pi / 180 * df$lat) * 
      cos(df$dist / earthR) + 
      cos(pi / 180 * df$lat) * 
      sin(df$dist / earthR) * 
      cos(pi / 180 * df$bea));

  lon2 = pi / 180 * df$lon + 
    atan2(sin( pi / 180 * df$bea) * 
                 sin(df$dist / earthR) * 
                 cos( pi / 180 * df$lat ), 
               cos(df$dist / earthR) - 
                 sin( pi / 180 * df$lat) * 
                 sin(lat2));

  df$latR = (180 * lat2) / pi
  df$lonR = (180 * lon2) / pi

  return(df);
};

df = calcPosBear(points)
plot(df$lon, df$lat)
points(df$lonR, df$latR, col="red")

Which brings the same result as for @clody96:

points = data.frame(
  lon = 25,
  lat = 60,
  bea = 30,
  time = 1000,
  vel = 1
)
df = calcPosBear(points)
df
  lon lat bea time vel dist        latR        lonR
1  25  60  30 1000   1 1000 60.00778805 25.00899533

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.