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I'm using a 3rd party library which makes several calls to the function:

Trace.WriteLine(string message);

This clutters up the visual studio output window and makes debugging my application difficult (for instance; XAML binding warnings).

I'm trying to find a way to stop all trace messages from a specific dll from dumping to the visual studio output window - is writing my own TraceListener the only path forward?


I can't make a TraceFilter / EventTypeFilter work for a string message without category -- although I can't find the documentation to back this up -- empirically:

TraceFilter.ShouldTrace(...)

is called by the following functions (not a complete set):

Trace.WriteLine(string message, string category);
Trace.TraceError(string message);
Trace.WriteLine(object o);

but isn't called by:

Trace.WriteLine(string message);

Does anyone know why this call avoids the ShouldTrace filter?

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  • Just wondering, why don't you want to make your own TraceListener?
    – jrh
    Commented May 5, 2017 at 13:09
  • @jrh If I remember correctly, I was trying to get rid of all these extra messages in the Visual Studio Output window so I could debug other issues such as Binding problems. Also, in a future version of the library I was using, the authors removed their Trace.WriteLine calls
    – sfm
    Commented May 22, 2017 at 13:27
  • In that case I think I know of an easy solution for that, I'll post an answer in a week or so when I get back. You were using Trace.WriteLine in your own code, though, right? Meaning, you don't just want to suppress all Trace.WriteLine messages, just messages from one dll.
    – jrh
    Commented May 22, 2017 at 15:14
  • I was using a 3rd party library which had Trace.WriteLine calls within its source code (and didn't want to branch/recompile it). I wanted to suppress the Trace.WriteLine messages from one specific compiled dll.
    – sfm
    Commented May 22, 2017 at 19:05

2 Answers 2

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  1. If you don't want to create your own TraceListener, the only way to suppress Trace messages from a problematic dll is to stop all Trace messages by using Trace.Listeners.Clear().

Note that this will stop your own Trace calls as well. I am mentioning this because I know of a few applications that never used Trace.WriteLine and were getting a severe performance hit from a very noisy library constantly writing to the output window.

  1. I would recommend creating a TraceListener that uses reflection to look for the dll you want to ignore in the call stack.

It's not possible to override Trace.WriteLine, but it is possible to override some calls in the default TraceListener to achieve the same effect.

Using a TraceListener like the one below can help you clean up your output window in Visual Studio so you can focus on the events you are interested in, rather than getting bombarded by messages from a third party library.

See sample code below:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Reflection;

// The library that calls Trace, causing the messages you want to suppress.
using NoisyLibrary;

namespace TraceSuppress
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Trace listener that ignores trace messages from a specific assembly.
    /// </summary>
    public class AssemblyFilteredListener : DefaultTraceListener
    {
        private Assembly assemblyToIgnore;

        public AssemblyFilteredListener(Assembly assemblyToIgnoreTracesFrom)
        {
            this.assemblyToIgnore = assemblyToIgnoreTracesFrom;
        }

        public bool TraceIsFromAssemblyToIgnore()
        {
            StackTrace traceCallStack = new StackTrace();

            StackFrame[] traceStackFrames = traceCallStack.GetFrames();

            // Look for the assembly to ignore in the call stack.
            //
            // This may be rather slow for very large call stacks. If you find that this is a bottleneck
            // there are optimizations available.
            foreach (StackFrame traceStackFrame in traceStackFrames)
            {
                MethodBase callStackMethod = traceStackFrame.GetMethod();

                bool methodIsFromAssemblyToIgnore = (callStackMethod.Module.Assembly == this.assemblyToIgnore);

                if (methodIsFromAssemblyToIgnore)
                {
                    return true;
                }

            }

            // The assembly to ignore was not found in the call stack.
            return false;         

        }


        public override void WriteLine(string message)
        {
            if (!this.TraceIsFromAssemblyToIgnore())
            {
                base.WriteLine(message);
            }
        }         

        public override void Write(string message)
        {
            if (!this.TraceIsFromAssemblyToIgnore())
            {
                base.Write(message);
            }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void SetupListeners()
        {
            // Clear out the default trace listener
            Trace.Listeners.Clear();

            // Grab the asssembly of the library, using any class from the library.
            Assembly assemblyToIgnore = typeof(NoisyLibrary.LibraryClass).Assembly;

            // Create a TraceListener that will ignore trace messages from that library
            TraceListener thisApplicationOnlyListener = new AssemblyFilteredListener(assemblyToIgnore);

            Trace.Listeners.Add(thisApplicationOnlyListener);

            // Now the custom trace listener is the only listener in Trace.Listeners.
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            SetupListeners();            

            // Testing
            //-------------------------------------------------------------------------

            // This still shows up in the output window in VS...
            Trace.WriteLine("This is a trace from the application, we want to see this.");

            // ...but the library function that calls trace no longer shows up.
            LibraryClass.MethodThatCallsTrace();

            // Now check the output window, the trace calls from that library will not be present.

        }
    }
}
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0

According to ILSpy, the Trace.WriteLine(string message) is declared as abstract and needs to be overridden by derived classes:

public abstract void WriteLine(string message);

All other methods you mention check the ShouldTrace and ultimately call the Trace.WriteLine(string message) message.

E.g.:

public virtual void WriteLine(string message, string category)
{
    if (Filter != null && 
        !Filter.ShouldTrace(null, "", TraceEventType.Verbose, 0, message))
    {
        return;
    }
    if (category == null)
    {
        WriteLine(message);
        return;
    }
    WriteLine(category + ": " + ((message == null) ? string.Empty : message));
}

So the real reason is in my opinion, a decision of the designer of the Trace class.

He could have made that Trace.WriteLine(string message) protected to incidate that it is not intended to be called directly, e.g.:

protected abstract void WriteLine(string message);
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  • 2
    I think that explains the design. If a 3rd party library is calling Trace.WriteLine(string message), is there no way to filter & suppress these messages?
    – sfm
    Commented Oct 14, 2013 at 14:12
  • seems no way to get around
    – liuhongbo
    Commented Sep 12, 2014 at 21:07

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