1

I have two checkbox fields. Using Javascript, I would like to make sure only one checkbox can be ticked. (e.g if one checkbox1 is ticked, if checkbox2 is ticked, checkbox1 will untick)

<input name="fries" type="checkbox" disabled="disabled" id="opt1"/>
<input type="checkbox" name="fries" id="opt2" disabled="disabled"/>

I would also like to have a radio button beneath, if this is clicked, I would like both checkboxes to be unticked.

 <input type="radio" name="o1" id="hotdog" onchange="setFries();"/>

Would the best way to do this be by writing a function, or could I use onclick statements?

  • 3
    Maybe vica versa -- two radios and a checkbox underneath? – VisioN Oct 14 '13 at 14:15
  • 5
    Well, the best way would be to just use radio buttons. – tymeJV Oct 14 '13 at 14:15
  • why did you use checkbox and not just radio button? – peernohell Oct 14 '13 at 14:16
  • Radio buttons are made specifically for this purpose. – ricksuggs Oct 14 '13 at 14:16
  • Yet another proposition of radio buttons. – Yaroslav Oct 14 '13 at 14:17
10

Well you should use radio buttons, but some people like the look of checkboxes, so this should take care of it. I've added a common class to your inputs:

function cbChange(obj) {
    var cbs = document.getElementsByClassName("cb");
    for (var i = 0; i < cbs.length; i++) {
        cbs[i].checked = false;
    }
    obj.checked = true;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/5uUjj/

  • If you like the look of checkboxes, you should better overlay radios with images. – VisioN Oct 14 '13 at 14:21
  • thanks very much, exactly what I meant. I specifically wanted to use checkboxes in this example. – scott Oct 14 '13 at 14:33
2

Also based on tymeJV's answer above, if you want to only deactivate the other checkbox when one is clicked you can do this:

function cbChange(obj) {
var instate=(obj.checked);
    var cbs = document.getElementsByClassName("cb");
    for (var i = 0; i < cbs.length; i++) {
        cbs[i].checked = false;
    }
    if(instate)obj.checked = true;
}

tymeJV's function does not let you have both unticked - this does. (yes, weird but true.. sometimes there's a semantic reason why you want two tickboxes not radio buttons)

1

Hope this helps:

function setFries(){
    var hotdog= document.getElementById("hotdog");
    var opt1= document.getElementById("opt1");
    var opt2 = document.getElementById("opt2");
    if(hotdog.checked){
      opt1.checked = false;
      opt2.checked = false;
    }else if(opt1.checked){
      opt2.checked = false;
     }else if(opt2.checked){
      opt1.checked = false;
    }
}
1
<input type="checkbox" name="fries" id="opt1" disabled="disabled" onclick="setFries(this);/>
<input type="checkbox" name="fries" id="opt2" disabled="disabled" onclick="setFries(this);/>
<input type="radio" name="o1" id="hotdog" onclick="setFries(this);"/>

Note that I am using onclick event:

function setFries(obj){
   var fries = document.getElementsByName('fries');
   if(obj.id =='hotdog') //Or check for obj.type == 'radio'
   {
      for(var i=0; i<fries.length; i++)
        fries[i].checked = true;
   }
   else{
      for(var i=0; i<fries.length; i++){
         if(fries[i].id != obj.id){
           fries[i].checked = !obj.checked;
           break;
         }
      }
   }
}
0

The simplest way I found for this was to not use any sort of code at all. I triggered an actions in the check box properties. 1. mouse up to reset a form. I then unselected (for reset) all of my fields accept for my desired check boxes. I then did the same thing for my other check box to go the other way. You can basically turn the check boxes into toggles or have any sort of crazy pattern you want.

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