I am trying to optimize the CSS delivery following the google documentation for developers https://developers.google.com/speed/docs/insights/OptimizeCSSDelivery#example

As you can see in the example of inlining a small CSS file the critical CSS in inlined in the head and the original small.css is loaded after onload of the page.

<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      .blue{color:blue;}
    </style>
    </head>
  <body>
    <div class="blue">
      Hello, world!
    </div>
  </body>
</html>
<noscript><link rel="stylesheet" href="small.css"></noscript>

My question regarding this example:

How to load a large css file after onload of the page?

  • 3
    Please answer the question in the answer section. Sticking to the Q&A format improves the ability to quickly scan the content (even for humans). – Pro Backup Jan 10 '14 at 21:31
  • i'm confused why a small css and a large css would be any different. i'm also confused by the <noscript>. how is the small.css loaded if javascript is enabled? – Jayen May 6 '14 at 7:48
  • The small.css is loaded via javascript if enabled – RafaSashi May 6 '14 at 9:56
  • After reading developers.google.com/web/fundamentals/performance/… I wonder if it would work just to apply display:none to all of the sections below the fold. Then after the page loads add a css to make the major sections block again. Since " (display: none) removes the element entirely from the render tree such that the element is invisible and is not part of layout." – JacobLett Aug 10 '16 at 15:08
  • loadCSS does that for you – vsync Dec 27 '16 at 22:32
up vote 42 down vote accepted

If you don't mind using jQuery, here is a simple code snippet to help you out. (Otherwise comment and I'll write a pure-js example

function loadStyleSheet(src) {
    if (document.createStyleSheet){
        document.createStyleSheet(src);
    }
    else {
        $("head").append($("<link rel='stylesheet' href='"+src+"' type='text/css' media='screen' />"));
    }
};

Just call this in your $(document).ready() or window.onload function and you're good to go.

For #2, why don't you try it out? Disable Javascript in your browser and see!

By the way, it's amazing how far a simple google search can get you; for the query "post load css", this was the fourth hit... http://www.vidalquevedo.com/how-to-load-css-stylesheets-dynamically-with-jquery

  • Thanks for the jquery function I will definitely use it! For #2 the disable option has been removed from the tools in firefox up to version 23 and I had to use the about:conf entries. I confirm the css is loaded using noscript out from html. – RafaSashi Oct 15 '13 at 7:22
  • @Fred you have an error in your code it should be $("head").append('<link href="'+src+'" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">'); – Karim Samir Feb 7 '16 at 22:53
  • @KarimSamir Back in the day, you needed to wrap it in $ to instantiate it as a DOM element. Not sure if this is still the case. – Fred Feb 13 '16 at 1:36
  • okay, but now you have to defer JQuery. – hellol11 May 3 '16 at 19:35
  • It only solved home page's CSS delivery rule to 100/100. Doesn't work on all other page. any idea? Other pages are still showing "Eliminate render-blocking JavaScript and CSS in above-the-fold content" issue. – Jonas T Oct 12 '16 at 0:56

A little modification to the function provided by Fred to make it more efficient and free of jQuery. I am using this function in production for my websites

        // to defer the loading of stylesheets
        // just add it right before the </body> tag
        // and before any javaScript file inclusion (for performance)  
        function loadStyleSheet(src){
            if (document.createStyleSheet) document.createStyleSheet(src);
            else {
                var stylesheet = document.createElement('link');
                stylesheet.href = src;
                stylesheet.rel = 'stylesheet';
                stylesheet.type = 'text/css';
                document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(stylesheet);
            }
        }
  • This solution works perfectly, but the loaded CSS file is never cached, meaning there's always an 'unstyled' flash before it loads. I am using critical CSS for very basic CSS, but it's still a very drastic change between the two. Any way to cache the file as it's dynamically loaded? – authorandrew May 3 '17 at 17:01

In addition to Fred's answer:

Solution using jQuery & Noscript

<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      .blue{color:blue;}
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="../jquery-1.4.2.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(document).ready(function(){
        if($("body").size()>0){
                if (document.createStyleSheet){
                    document.createStyleSheet('style.css');
                }
                else {
                    $("head").append($("<link rel='stylesheet' 
                    href='style.css' 
                    type='text/css' media='screen' />"));
                }
            }
        });
    </script>
    </head>
  <body>
    <div class="blue">
      Hello, world!
    </div>
  </body>
</html>
<noscript><link rel="stylesheet" href="small.css"></noscript>

from http://www.vidalquevedo.com/how-to-load-css-stylesheets-dynamically-with-jquery

Using pure Javascript & Noscript

<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      .blue{color:blue;}
    </style>
    <script type="text/javascript">
          var stylesheet = document.createElement('link');
          stylesheet.href = 'style.css';
          stylesheet.rel = 'stylesheet';
          stylesheet.type = 'text/css';
          document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild(stylesheet);
    </script>
    </head>
  <body>
    <div class="blue">
      Hello, world!
    </div>
  </body>
</html>
<noscript><link rel="stylesheet" href="small.css"></noscript>
  • 6
    i'm confused at how the second one's javascript is different from just putting the link at the end of the head. – Jayen May 6 '14 at 7:49
  • The first solution requiers the jQuery library whereas the second one doesn't – RafaSashi Jan 21 '16 at 14:33
  • I'm not asking the difference between the first and second. The second doesn't wait for DOMContentLoaded so it seems to be the same as <link href="style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">. – Jayen Jan 21 '16 at 20:44
  • @Jayen Your statement is correct. It looks like current solutions accept the trade off of not deferring loading when JavaScript is disabled (under the assumption that it is hopefully uncommon). – Taylor Edmiston Aug 5 '16 at 4:08
  • 1
    Isn't having anything after a </html> tag invalid HTML? – Sparky Oct 13 '16 at 20:10

Try this snippet

The author claims it was published by Google's PageSpeed Team

<script>
    var cb = function() {
    var l = document.createElement('link'); l.rel = 'stylesheet';
    l.href = 'yourCSSfile.css';
    var h = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; h.parentNode.insertBefore(l, h); };
    var raf = requestAnimationFrame || mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
              webkitRequestAnimationFrame || msRequestAnimationFrame;
    if (raf) raf(cb);
    else window.addEventListener('load', cb);
</script>
  • 1
    I applied this technical and my homepage passed Optimize CSS delivery rule, however, this not work in details page, I use the same script because this script in layout file. – Huy Nguyen May 31 '16 at 10:35
  • Same here. It only optimize home page's CSS delivery rule. Doesn't work on all other page. any idea? – Jonas T Oct 12 '16 at 0:07
  • Did you check if other pages have additional stylesheets loaded ? Although i posted this answer I have never used this method. I load my CSS the old fashion way and try not to obsess with Google page speed score. Minify & optimize your css and work towards a better content to rank up. – Raja Khoury Oct 12 '16 at 1:55
  • I think the author modified it a bit: see developers.google.com/speed/docs/insights/OptimizeCSSDelivery – rolu Oct 12 '16 at 21:05
  • Using either of that code actually reduces my score, not improve. Before using their "suggested defer code" Score: 77. After using (either one). Score: 69. So uh... no thanks. – Shawn Rebelo Mar 30 '17 at 22:33

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