9

When I compile my C++ project, many shared object files are created with extensions such as

.so
.so.0
.so.7
.so.0.7

I need to add all those to my .gitignore file. Were this a regex, I could use

\.so[\.0-9]*

However, the documentation says that .gitignore

treats the pattern as a shell glob suitable for consumption by fnmatch(3) with the FNM_PATHNAME flag

I found no way to do what I want with the fnmatch documentations I found. Is there really no way to do this?

  • 3
    Use multiple lines: *.so *.so.[0-9] *.so.[0-9].[0-9] etc. If revs may go into two digits you'll need even more glob patterns. (hg has syntax: directives in its .hgignore so that you can mix regex and glob as desired; maybe someone will add something like this to git someday.) – torek Oct 15 '13 at 21:30
  • 1
    Just keeping separate install hierarchy solves this kind of thing entirely anyway. – jthill Jul 2 '14 at 1:43
  • Of interest: github.com/git/git/commit/… – VonC Feb 18 '18 at 19:23
13
+50

While the answer by @SpeakEasy can ignore .so files in a single step using *.so*, for your use case of ignoring files in formats specified, you can use two entries in your .gitignore for more specific ignore rule

*.so
*.so.[0-9]*

From gitignore man page

Each line in a gitignore file specifies a pattern.

Git treats the pattern as a shell glob suitable for consumption by fnmatch

The important thing to note is that the pattern is not the same as regular expressions.

Python has a module named fnmatch, you can use that to verify whether a particular filename matches the pattern or not.

Sample example:

import fnmatch
pattern = "*.so.[0-9]*"
filenames = ["a.so", "b.so.0", "b.so.11", "b.so.1.0", "b.so.1.0.12"]

for filename in filenames:
    print filename, fnmatch.fnmatch(filename, pattern)

>>> a.so False
    b.so.0 True
    b.so.11 True
    b.so.1.0 True
    b.so.1.0.12 True
  • This is not exactly the same (although it's probably just fine): for instance, it matches a.so. and b.so...9. – torek Jul 4 '14 at 16:51
  • Yes, I am not an expert so I don't know who should I trust most, but I feel like @torek answer is safer and clear. Tell me if I am wrong. – arthur.sw Jul 5 '14 at 9:52
  • 1
    @mu無 Everything that will be match by *.so.[0-9]*.[0-9]* will also be match by *.so.[0-9]*, right? How to write *.so.someDigits.someDigits, someDigits being only any number of digits? – arthur.sw Jul 5 '14 at 15:13
  • @arthur.sw If you want to write *.so.someDigits.someDigits, someDigits being any number of digits in a single line, you will need to use pattern *.so[.0-9]* as I suggested earlier, which will ignore all these. But it will also ignore files of the type *.so..., though they won't be generated under normal flow. – mu 無 Jul 5 '14 at 15:17
  • 1
    @mu無 I think your pattern will match my.pattern.is.so.6ood. I agree it is not a big deal. – arthur.sw Jul 6 '14 at 12:28
5

Does adding the line *.so* not work? Or do you need more fine control?

  • 2
    I wanted better control just to be safe. I'm always "discovering" new extensions. – roim Oct 15 '13 at 22:05
1

I think you can accomplish it in two lines:

.so
.so.[0-9]*
0

From torek's comment:

Use multiple lines:

*.so
*.so.[0-9]
*.so.[0-9].[0-9]

etc.

I don't know if there is a better way...

0

Python has a module named fnmatch, you can use that to verify whether a particular filename matches the pattern or not.

Not exactly correct like @mu 無 said.

https://git-scm.com/docs/gitignore

For example, "/*.c" matches "cat-file.c" but not "mozilla-sha1/sha1.c".

But I tried in fnmatch:

>>> p = "/*.c"
>>> f = "cat-file.c"
>>> fnmatch(f, p)
False
>>> f2 = "abc/def/cat-file.c"
>>> fnmatch(f2, p)
False
>>> p2 = "*.c"
>>> fnmatch(f, p2)
True
>>> fnmatch(f2, p2)
True

fnmatch not match cat-file.c but .gitignore support.

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