96

Currently, I got an array like that:

var uniqueCount = Array();

After a few steps, my array looks like that:

uniqueCount = [a,b,c,d,d,e,a,b,c,f,g,h,h,h,e,a];

How can I count how many a,b,c are there in the array? I want to have a result like:

a = 3
b = 1
c = 2
d = 2

etc.

27 Answers 27

24

function count() {
    array_elements = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "a", "b", "c", "f", "g", "h", "h", "h", "e", "a"];

    array_elements.sort();

    var current = null;
    var cnt = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < array_elements.length; i++) {
        if (array_elements[i] != current) {
            if (cnt > 0) {
                document.write(current + ' comes --> ' + cnt + ' times<br>');
            }
            current = array_elements[i];
            cnt = 1;
        } else {
            cnt++;
        }
    }
    if (cnt > 0) {
        document.write(current + ' comes --> ' + cnt + ' times');
    }

}

count();

Demo Fiddle

You can use higher-order functions too to do the operation. See this answer

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    the extra if statement after the loop is unnecessary... just use for (var i = 0; i <= array_elements.length; i++) { or <= instead of <. – EmmaGamma Feb 9 '15 at 1:58
  • Hi @Vinay, maybe you could help me here? stackoverflow.com/questions/57819850/… – SMPLYJR Sep 6 '19 at 10:05
315
var counts = {};
your_array.forEach(function(x) { counts[x] = (counts[x] || 0)+1; });
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    This is definitely the simplest answer – Josh Beam Dec 3 '15 at 23:37
  • 3
    (counts[x] || 0)+1 how this is giving count ? – jsduniya Jan 2 '17 at 17:30
  • 5
    @SidBhalke: The expression counts[x] || 0 returns the value of counts[x] if it is set, otherwise 0. Then just add one and set it again in the object and the count is done. – Constantinius Feb 7 '17 at 11:52
  • 1
    @SheetJS if you're wondering why the downvote - it was me; I was browsing on mobile, and have clicked the button w/o actually noticing. Once I found out it was too late to revert. Apologies for that, the answer is really good. If you want to edit it, I'd be glad to reverse. – Todor Minakov Jan 19 '19 at 10:17
  • 4
    Also with reduce: var counts = your_array.reduce((map, val) => {map[val] = (map[val] || 0)+1; return map}, {} ); – Alberto89 May 17 '19 at 8:29
70

Something like this:

uniqueCount = ["a","b","c","d","d","e","a","b","c","f","g","h","h","h","e","a"];
var count = {};
uniqueCount.forEach(function(i) { count[i] = (count[i]||0) + 1;});
console.log(count);

Use a simple for loop instead of forEach if you don't want this to break in older browsers.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    @web_dev he creates an associative array object called count that will have a key value pair for each unique element in the array, where the key is the unique element value and the value is the count. He iterates over the array and for each value either increments the value or creates the key value pair (the value of the non-existent key evaluates to undefined so the || or operator takes a zero instead and adds the 1) – robisrob Jul 9 '16 at 3:17
  • @neelmeg Maybe writing all parameters for "forEach" helps better to understand ("i" is each array value and NOT it's índex): uniqueCount.forEach(function(value, index) { count[value] = (count[value] || 0) + 1; }); – Pedro Ferreira Apr 4 '17 at 23:15
36

I stumbled across this (very old) question. Interestingly the most obvious and elegant solution (imho) is missing: Array.prototype.reduce(...). All major browsers support this feature since about 2011 (IE) or even earlier (all others):

var arr = ['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a'];
var map = arr.reduce(function(prev, cur) {
  prev[cur] = (prev[cur] || 0) + 1;
  return prev;
}, {});

// map is an associative array mapping the elements to their frequency:
document.write(JSON.stringify(map));
// prints {"a": 3, "b": 2, "c": 2, "d": 2, "e": 2, "f": 1, "g": 1, "h": 3}

| improve this answer | |
10

Single line based on reduce array function

const uniqueCount =  ["a", "b", "c", "d", "d", "e", "a", "b", "c", "f", "g", "h", "h", "h", "e", "a"];
const distribution = uniqueCount.reduce((acum,cur) => Object.assign(acum,{[cur]: (acum[cur] | 0)+1}),{});
console.log(JSON.stringify(distribution,null,2));

| improve this answer | |
8

Simple is better, one variable, one function :)

const counts = arr.reduce((acc, value) => ({
   ...acc,
   [value]: (acc[value] || 0) + 1
}), {});
| improve this answer | |
6

I think this is the simplest way how to count occurrences with same value in array.

var a = [true, false, false, false];
a.filter(function(value){
    return value === false;
}).length                                      
| improve this answer | |
5

// Initial array
let array = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'd', 'e', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'h', 'h', 'e', 'a'];

// Unique array without duplicates ['a', 'b', ... , 'h']
let unique = [...new Set(array)];

// This array counts duplicates [['a', 3], ['b', 2], ... , ['h', 3]] 
let duplicates = unique.map(value => [value, array.filter(str => str === value).length]);
| improve this answer | |
4

You can have an object that contains counts. Walk over the list and increment the count for each element:

var counts = {};

uniqueCount.forEach(function(element) {
  counts[element] = (counts[element] || 0) + 1;
});

for (var element in counts) {
  console.log(element + ' = ' + counts[element]);
} 
| improve this answer | |
  • why did you set this condition counts[element] || 0? – AskMen Jun 12 at 12:06
4

You can solve it without using any for/while loops ou forEach.

function myCounter(inputWords) {        
    return inputWords.reduce( (countWords, word) => {
        countWords[word] = ++countWords[word] || 1;
        return countWords;
    }, {});
}

Hope it helps you!

| improve this answer | |
4

// new example.
var str= [20,1,-1,2,-2,3,3,5,5,1,2,4,20,4,-1,-2,5];

function findOdd(para) {
  var count = {};
  para.forEach(function(para) {
  count[para] = (count[para] || 0) + 1;
  });
  return count;
}

console.log(findOdd(str));

| improve this answer | |
4

Nobody responding seems to be using the Map() built-in for this, which tends to be my go-to combined with Array.prototype.reduce():

const data = ['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a'];
const result = data.reduce((a, c) => a.set(c, (a.get(c) || 0) + 1), new Map());
console.log(...result);

N.b., you'll have to polyfill Map() if wanting to use it in older browsers.

| improve this answer | |
  • Could you explain a little bit in-depth how this is working ? (specially the set / get part). I tried to break the reducer into a function but I have "get" is not a function in response. – Antoine Nedelec May 7 at 7:32
  • Ok get and set functions are coming from the Map object. But the initial accumulator is not a Map object, so why does the reduced version of the reducer takes one ? – Antoine Nedelec May 7 at 7:39
  • @AntoineNedelec The initial value is a new Map object; see the second argument of the reduce. Map.prototype.set returns the map object, and Map.prototype.get returns undefined or the value of whatever key is supplied to it. This lets us get the current count of each letter (or 0 if undefined), then increment that by one, then set that letter's count to the new count, which returns the map and becomes the new accumulator value. – aendrew May 18 at 20:13
3

You can do something like that:

uniqueCount = ['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a'];
var map = new Object();

for(var i = 0; i < uniqueCount.length; i++) {
 if(map[uniqueCount[i]] != null) {
    map[uniqueCount[i]] += 1;
} else {
    map[uniqueCount[i]] = 1;
    }
}

now you have a map with all characters count

| improve this answer | |
1
var uniqueCount = ['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a'];
// here we will collect only unique items from the array
var uniqueChars = [];

// iterate through each item of uniqueCount
for (i of uniqueCount) {
// if this is an item that was not earlier in uniqueCount, 
// put it into the uniqueChars array
  if (uniqueChars.indexOf(i) == -1) {
    uniqueChars.push(i);
  } 
}
// after iterating through all uniqueCount take each item in uniqueChars
// and compare it with each item in uniqueCount. If this uniqueChars item 
// corresponds to an item in uniqueCount, increase letterAccumulator by one.
for (x of uniqueChars) {
  let letterAccumulator = 0;
  for (i of uniqueCount) {
    if (i == x) {letterAccumulator++;}
  }
  console.log(`${x} = ${letterAccumulator}`);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for updating it, a lot more helpful to those beginning. – Regular Joe Mar 25 '17 at 17:36
1

Duplicates in an array containing alphabets:

var arr = ["a", "b", "a", "z", "e", "a", "b", "f", "d", "f"],
  sortedArr = [],
  count = 1;

sortedArr = arr.sort();

for (var i = 0; i < sortedArr.length; i = i + count) {
  count = 1;
  for (var j = i + 1; j < sortedArr.length; j++) {
    if (sortedArr[i] === sortedArr[j])
      count++;
  }
  document.write(sortedArr[i] + " = " + count + "<br>");
}

Duplicates in an array containing numbers:

var arr = [2, 1, 3, 2, 8, 9, 1, 3, 1, 1, 1, 2, 24, 25, 67, 10, 54, 2, 1, 9, 8, 1],
  sortedArr = [],
  count = 1;
sortedArr = arr.sort(function(a, b) {
  return a - b
});
for (var i = 0; i < sortedArr.length; i = i + count) {
  count = 1;
  for (var j = i + 1; j < sortedArr.length; j++) {
    if (sortedArr[i] === sortedArr[j])
      count++;
  }
  document.write(sortedArr[i] + " = " + count + "<br>");
}

| improve this answer | |
1

var testArray = ['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a'];

var newArr = [];
testArray.forEach((item) => {
    newArr[item] = testArray.filter((el) => {
            return el === item;
    }).length;
})
console.log(newArr);
| improve this answer | |
1

simplified sheet.js answare

var counts = {};
var aarr=['a','b','a'];
aarr.forEach(x=>counts[x]=(counts[x] || 0)+1 );
console.log(counts)

| improve this answer | |
0

A combination of good answers:

var count = {};
var arr = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'd', 'e', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'h', 'h', 'e', 'a'];
var iterator = function (element) {
    count[element] = (count[element] || 0) + 1;
}

if (arr.forEach) {
    arr.forEach(function (element) {
        iterator(element);
    });
} else {
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        iterator(arr[i]);
    }
}  

Hope it's helpful.

| improve this answer | |
0
public class CalculateCount {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int a[] = {1,2,1,1,5,4,3,2,2,1,4,4,5,3,4,5,4};
    Arrays.sort(a);
    int count=1;
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<a.length-1;i++){
        if(a[i]!=a[i+1]){
            System.out.println("The Number "+a[i]+" appears "+count+" times");
            count=1;                
        }
        else{
            count++;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("The Number "+a[i]+" appears "+count+" times");

}   

}

| improve this answer | |
  • Can you add some context around this? – Neo Jul 19 '17 at 14:35
0

By using array.map we can reduce the loop, see this on jsfiddle

function Check(){
    var arr = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
    var result = [];
    for(i=0; i< arr.length; i++){
        var duplicate = 0;
        var val = arr[i];
        arr.map(function(x){
            if(val === x) duplicate++;
        })
        result.push(duplicate>= 2);
    }
    return result;
}

To Test:

var test = new Check(1,2,1,4,1);
console.log(test);
| improve this answer | |
0

var string = ['a','a','b','c','c','c','c','c','a','a','a'];

function stringCompress(string){

var obj = {},str = "";
string.forEach(function(i) { 
  obj[i] = (obj[i]||0) + 1;
});

for(var key in obj){
  str += (key+obj[key]);
}
  console.log(obj);
  console.log(str);
}stringCompress(string)

/*
Always open to improvement ,please share 
*/

| improve this answer | |
0

Create a file for example demo.js and run it in console with node demo.js and you will get occurrence of elements in the form of matrix.

var multipleDuplicateArr = Array(10).fill(0).map(()=>{return Math.floor(Math.random() * Math.floor(9))});
console.log(multipleDuplicateArr);

var resultArr = Array(Array('KEYS','OCCURRENCE'));

for (var i = 0; i < multipleDuplicateArr.length; i++) {
  var flag = true;
  for (var j = 0; j < resultArr.length; j++) {
     if(resultArr[j][0] == multipleDuplicateArr[i]){
       resultArr[j][1] = resultArr[j][1] + 1;
       flag = false;
      }
  }
  if(flag){
    resultArr.push(Array(multipleDuplicateArr[i],1));
  }
}

console.log(resultArr);

You will get result in console as below:

[ 1, 4, 5, 2, 6, 8, 7, 5, 0, 5 ] . // multipleDuplicateArr
[ [ 'KEYS', 'OCCURENCE' ],        // resultArr
  [ 1, 1 ],
  [ 4, 1 ],
  [ 5, 3 ],
  [ 2, 1 ],
  [ 6, 1 ],
  [ 8, 1 ],
  [ 7, 1 ],
  [ 0, 1 ] ]
| improve this answer | |
0

Quickest way:

Сomputational complexity is O(n).

function howMuchIsRepeated_es5(arr) {
	const count = {};
	for (let i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
		const val = arr[i];
		if (val in count) {
			count[val] = count[val] + 1;
		} else {
			count[val] = 1;
		}
	}

	for (let key in count) {
		console.log("Value " + key + " is repeated " + count[key] + " times");
	}
}

howMuchIsRepeated_es5(['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a']);

The shortest code:

Use ES6.

function howMuchIsRepeated_es6(arr) {
	// count is [ [valX, count], [valY, count], [valZ, count]... ];
	const count = [...new Set(arr)].map(val => [val, arr.join("").split(val).length - 1]);

	for (let i = 0; i < count.length; i++) {
		console.log(`Value ${count[i][0]} is repeated ${count[i][1]} times`);
	}
}

howMuchIsRepeated_es6(['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a']);

| improve this answer | |
0
var arr = ['a','d','r','a','a','f','d'];  

//call function and pass your array, function will return an object with array values as keys and their count as the key values.
duplicatesArr(arr);

function duplicatesArr(arr){
    var obj = {}
    for(var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++){
        obj[arr[i]] = [];
        for(var x = 0; x < arr.length; x++){
            (arr[i] == arr[x]) ? obj[arr[i]].push(x) : '';
        }
        obj[arr[i]] = obj[arr[i]].length;
    }

    console.log(obj);
    return obj;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Declare an object arr to hold the unique set as keys. Populate arr by looping through the array once using map. If the key has not been previously found then add the key and assign a value of zero. On each iteration increment the key's value.

Given testArray:

var testArray = ['a','b','c','d','d','e','a','b','c','f','g','h','h','h','e','a'];

solution:

var arr = {};
testArray.map(x=>{ if(typeof(arr[x])=="undefined") arr[x]=0; arr[x]++;});

JSON.stringify(arr) will output

{"a":3,"b":2,"c":2,"d":2,"e":2,"f":1,"g":1,"h":3}

Object.keys(arr) will return ["a","b","c","d","e","f","g","h"]

To find the occurrences of any item e.g. b arr['b'] will output 2

| improve this answer | |
  • Please don't post only code as an answer, but also include an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem. Answers with an explanation are generally of higher quality and are more likely to attract upvotes. – Mark Rotteveel Oct 19 '19 at 7:01
0
uniqueCount = ["a","b","a","c","b","a","d","b","c","f","g","h","h","h","e","a"];
var count = {};
uniqueCount.forEach((i) => { count[i] = ++count[i]|| 1});
console.log(count);
| improve this answer | |
-1

It is simple in javascript using array reduce method:

const arr = ['a','d','r','a','a','f','d'];
const result =  arr.reduce((json,val)=>({...json, [val]:(json[val] | 0) + 1}),{});
console.log(result)
//{ a:3,d:2,r:1,f:1 }

| improve this answer | |

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