-1

I dont know what iteration method to be used for more efficiency, Here i have listed my solution which i have tried. is there any other way to iterate, i mean any special methods or ways?

Method One :

Here i have used two for loops so the iteration goes for 2N times

public void CountChar()
{
    String s = Ipstring();
    int[] counts = new int[256];
    char[] c = s.ToCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < c.Length; ++i)
    {
        counts[c[i]]++;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < c.Length; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(c[i].ToString() + " " + counts[c[i]]);
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

Method 2 :

public void CountChar()
{
    _inputWord = Ipstring();
    char[] test = _inputWord.ToCharArray();
    char temp;
    int count = 0, tcount = 0;
    Array.Sort(test);
    int length = test.Length;
    temp = test[0];

    while (length > 0)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < test.Length; i++)
        {
            if (temp == test[i])
            {
                count++;
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine(temp + " " + count);
        tcount = tcount + count;

        length = length - count;
        count = 0;
        if (tcount != test.Length)
            temp = test[tcount];
        //atchutharam. aaachhmrttu
    }
}

Method three:

public void CountChar()
{
    int indexcount = 0;
    s = Ipstring();
    int[] count = new int[s.Length];
    foreach (char c in s)
    {
        Console.Write(c);
        count[s.IndexOf(c)]++;
    }

    foreach (char c in s)
    {
        if (indexcount <= s.IndexOf(c))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(c);
            Console.WriteLine(count[s.IndexOf(c)]);
            Console.WriteLine("");
        }

        indexcount++;
        ////atchutharam
    }
}
  • 2
    nope, number of steps is 2xN so complexity is O(N) <- you can't get better here than O(N) – wudzik Oct 16 '13 at 12:48
  • 1
    In method 1, a char can be >= 256 so you need to handle that. – Peter Hull Oct 16 '13 at 12:54
  • 1
    Also, you don't need ToCharArray(). for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; ++i) { counts[s[i]]++; } should work, too. Or foreach (char c in s) { ... } – Corak Oct 16 '13 at 12:57
  • Btw.: defining a character as indexer of an array isn´t a good idea - although it represents an integer. The resulting array would have too much NULL-values in an arbitrary order. Better use a list where you put your characters in... – HimBromBeere Oct 16 '13 at 12:58
  • 1
    @Ram 3rd method is same as 1st -> different syntax, I don't understand 2nd it looks really bad. I suggest you to use dictionary instead, I can post some code if you want. – wudzik Oct 16 '13 at 13:03
1

You can use LINQ methods to group the characters and count them:

public void CountChar() {
  String s = Ipstring();
  foreach (var g in s.GroupBy(c => c)) {
    Console.WriteLine("{0} : {1}", g.Key, g.Count());
  }
}
  • I was just going to add same answer :) – wudzik Oct 16 '13 at 13:08
0

Your loops are not nested so your complexity is not N*N (O(n^2)) but 2*N which gives O(N) because you can always ignore constants :

for(){}
for(){} // O(2N) = O(N)

for()
{
    for(){}
} // O(N*N) = O(N^2)

If you really want to know which one of these 3 solutions have the fastest execution time in a specific environment, do a benchmark.

If you want the one that is the most clean and readable (And you should almost always aim for that), just use LINQ :

String s = Ipstring();
int count = s.Count();

It will execute in O(N) too.

0

If you need the results in arrays:

var groups = s.GroupBy(i => i ).OrderBy( g => g.Key );
var chars = groups.Select(g => g.Key).ToArray();
var counts = groups.Select(g => g.Count()).ToArray();

Otherwise:

var dict = s.GroupBy(i => i).ToDictionary(g => g.Key, g => g.Count());

foreach (var g in dict)
{
    Console.WriteLine( "{0}: {1}", g.Key, g.Value );
}
  • var testString = Ipstring(); testString.ToCharArray() .OrderBy(h => h).ToLookup(e => e) .Select(e => new { character = e.Key, count = e.Count() }).ToList() .ForEach(j => Console.WriteLine("letter {0}, count {1}", j.character, j.count)); – Ram Oct 18 '13 at 13:12

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