66

Can I get a list of all registered directives, services, controllers, etc. at runtime . . . ?

1

4 Answers 4

66

You can get a list of the providers (ie services/directives/controllers/factories/etc) for each module, although the list is kind of cryptic.

Say you have the following:

var mod = angular.module('myModule', []);
mod.factory('fact1', function($dependency1, $dependency2){ ... });
mod.service('serv1', function($dependency3, $dependency4){ ... });
mod.controller('ctrl1', function($dependency2, $dependency3){ ... });
mod.factory('fact2', function($dependency1, $dependency4){ ... });
...

Then the mod variable will contain an attribute called mod._invokeQueue that will contain an array of all the providers that are part of that module. The _invokeQueue will look something like this:

[
    ['$provide', 'factory', Arguments['fact1', ['$dependency1', '$dependency2', function(){}],
    ['$provide', 'service', Arguments['serv1', ['$dependency3', '$dependency4', function(){}],
    ['$provide', 'controller', Arguments['ctrl1', ['$dependency2', '$dependency3', function(){}],
    ['$provide', 'factory', Arguments['fact2', ['$dependency1', '$dependency4', function(){}]
    ...
]

So you can search through that mod._invokeQueue for each provider that it contains.

But that will only contain the list of providers for that specific module. If you want to get a list of all of the dependent modules, you will need to loop through the mod.requires array.

If the module has module-level dependencies, like so:

var mod = angular.module('myModule', ['otherModule1','otherModule2']);

Then the mod object will also have a mod.requires array that contains the names of those module dependencies, like so:

angular.forEach(mod.requires, function(requiredModuleName){
    // first get a reference to the required module by calling angular.module()
    var requiredMod = angular.module(requiredModuleName);
    // requiredMod will have its own ._invokeQueue
    // requiredMod._invokeQueue will look like the _invokeQueue from above
    ...
    // do something with the additional providers in _invokeQueue
});
11
  • 3
    Thank you! Very helpful. I wish Angular just exposed some metadata about itself in a kinder way - getServices(), etc.
    – blaster
    Oct 18, 2013 at 15:58
  • If I do var mod = angular.module('myModule');... from Chrome dev's console when the app runs, it doesn't show anything in the array. Is this supposed to be in the .js code itself and not runtime?
    – HP.
    Jan 3, 2014 at 7:53
  • Yeah, you can't modify a module once it has been loaded (as far as I know), so you'd have to do some sort of console logging or something to see what is inside (such as adding a console.log() statement right after the module is declared in the code)
    – tennisgent
    Jan 7, 2014 at 3:05
  • 9
    Actually you can. You can register new modules/controllers etc directly in the console of Chrome and even from IE or any other browser that supports a console. If you type in the console angular.module('myApp')._invokeQueue you will see the array of all registered components.
    – GxG
    Mar 10, 2014 at 13:15
  • 1
    I stand corrected. Apparently you can modify a module on the fly. Thanks to @GxG for the clarification.
    – tennisgent
    Jun 6, 2014 at 15:05
43

Try this:

angular.module('MyApp')['_invokeQueue'].forEach(function(value){ 
    console.log(value[1] + ": " + value[2][0]);
})
1
  • Give that man a cookie ! Best answer to me; it really does list all of them in the console. Dec 7, 2018 at 11:25
32

Here's how you can get most services

Ie: constants, values, factories, services.

    function allServices(mod, r) {
      var inj = angular.element(document).injector().get;
      if (!r) r = {};
      angular.forEach(angular.module(mod).requires, function(m) {allServices(m,r)});
      angular.forEach(angular.module(mod)._invokeQueue, function(a) {
        try { r[a[2][0]] = inj(a[2][0]); } catch (e) {}
      });
      return r;
    };

    allMyServices = allServices('myApp');

Now when you type in the console allMyServices. you'll get an auto-complete list of them.


The function above can fail in certain situations where angular.element(document).injector() returns undefined. You can use the function below instead...


Alternate Method

    var inj;
    function allServices(mod, r) {
      if (!r) {
        r = {};
        inj = angular.element(document.querySelector('[ng-app]')).injector().get;
      }
      angular.forEach(angular.module(mod).requires, function(m) {allServices(m,r)});
      angular.forEach(angular.module(mod)._invokeQueue, function(a) {
        try { r[a[2][0]] = inj(a[2][0]); } catch (e) {}
      });
      return r;
    };

    allMyServices = allServices('myApp');

Now when you type in the console allMyServices. you'll get an auto-complete list of them.


Note: With either method, be sure to replace 'MyApp' with your module name.

4
  • 1
    allMyServices = allServices(document.querySelector('[ng-app]').getAttribute('ng-app')); Mar 1, 2015 at 3:56
  • 1
    This can still potentially fail if the app was loaded with angular.bootstrap(), in which case my favorite thing to do when I need an injector is grab the first element with the ng-scope class, since any element within an app will return the same injector: angular.element('.ng-scope').injector(); Apr 5, 2016 at 20:59
  • The autocomplete is golden. Jan 3, 2017 at 20:01
  • To access the property of a specific module, your answer helped me come up with this: angular.element(document.querySelector('[ng-app]')).injector().get(Modules.YourModuleId).yourProperty
    – nitzel
    Dec 1, 2017 at 12:27
0

I've created a GitHub gist with some code that can output the dependencies in a Graphviz friendly format. Which means you should be able to visualize the dependency graph.

See https://gist.github.com/dlidstrom/a2f787cef41ea4fcb8aa74d459f49270.

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