136

I tried implementing this formula: http://andrew.hedges.name/experiments/haversine/ The aplet does good for the two points I am testing:

enter image description here

Yet my code is not working.

from math import sin, cos, sqrt, atan2

R = 6373.0

lat1 = 52.2296756
lon1 = 21.0122287
lat2 = 52.406374
lon2 = 16.9251681

dlon = lon2 - lon1
dlat = lat2 - lat1
a = (sin(dlat/2))**2 + cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * (sin(dlon/2))**2
c = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1-a))
distance = R * c

print "Result", distance
print "Should be", 278.546

The distance it returns is 5447.05546147. Why?

189

Edit: Just as a note, if you just need a quick and easy way of finding the distance between two points, I strongly recommend using the approach described in Kurt's answer below instead of re-implementing Haversine -- see his post for rationale.

This answer focuses just on answering the specific bug OP ran into.


It's because in Python, all the trig functions use radians, not degrees.

You can either convert the numbers manually to radians, or use the radians function from the math module:

from math import sin, cos, sqrt, atan2, radians

# approximate radius of earth in km
R = 6373.0

lat1 = radians(52.2296756)
lon1 = radians(21.0122287)
lat2 = radians(52.406374)
lon2 = radians(16.9251681)

dlon = lon2 - lon1
dlat = lat2 - lat1

a = sin(dlat / 2)**2 + cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * sin(dlon / 2)**2
c = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1 - a))

distance = R * c

print("Result:", distance)
print("Should be:", 278.546, "km")

The distance is now returning the correct value of 278.545589351 km.

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  • 13
    this is true in any programming language, and also in differential calculus. using degrees is the exception, and only used in human speech. – bluesmoon Oct 17 '13 at 5:19
  • 10
    Word to the wise, this formula requires all degrees be positive. radians(abs(52.123)) should do the trick... – Richard Dunn Jul 4 '17 at 11:41
214

Update: 04/2018: Note that Vincenty distance is deprecated since GeoPy version 1.13 - you should use geopy.distance.distance() instead!


The answers above are based on the Haversine formula, which assumes the earth is a sphere, which results in errors of up to about 0.5% (according to help(geopy.distance)). Vincenty distance uses more accurate ellipsoidal models such as WGS-84, and is implemented in geopy. For example,

import geopy.distance

coords_1 = (52.2296756, 21.0122287)
coords_2 = (52.406374, 16.9251681)

print geopy.distance.vincenty(coords_1, coords_2).km

will print the distance of 279.352901604 kilometers using the default ellipsoid WGS-84. (You can also choose .miles or one of several other distance units).

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  • 1
    Thanks. Can you please update your answer with coordinates I provided in question instead of Newport and Cleveland. It will give a better understanding to future readers. – gwaramadze Apr 5 '17 at 11:27
  • 1
    The arbitrary locations of Newport and Cleveland come from the example geopy documentation in the PyPI listing: pypi.python.org/pypi/geopy – Jason Parham May 29 '17 at 14:41
  • I had to modify Kurt Peek's answer to this: Capitalization required: print geopy.distance.VincentyDistance(coords_1, coords_2).km 279.352901604 – Jim Jun 14 '17 at 19:35
  • 3
    You should probably use geopy.distance.distance(…) in code which is an alias of the currently best (=most accurate) distance formula. (Vincenty at the moment.) – mbirth Jan 13 '18 at 14:51
  • 5
    Using geopy.distance.vincenty in geopy-1.18.1 outputs: Vincenty is deprecated and is going to be removed in geopy 2.0. Use geopy.distance.geodesic (or the default geopy.distance.distance) instead, which is more accurate and always converges. – juanmah Mar 8 '19 at 8:39
81

For people (like me) coming here via search engine and just looking for a solution which works out of the box, I recommend installing mpu. Install it via pip install mpu --user and use it like this to get the haversine distance:

import mpu

# Point one
lat1 = 52.2296756
lon1 = 21.0122287

# Point two
lat2 = 52.406374
lon2 = 16.9251681

# What you were looking for
dist = mpu.haversine_distance((lat1, lon1), (lat2, lon2))
print(dist)  # gives 278.45817507541943.

An alternative package is gpxpy.

If you don't want dependencies, you can use:

import math


def distance(origin, destination):
    """
    Calculate the Haversine distance.

    Parameters
    ----------
    origin : tuple of float
        (lat, long)
    destination : tuple of float
        (lat, long)

    Returns
    -------
    distance_in_km : float

    Examples
    --------
    >>> origin = (48.1372, 11.5756)  # Munich
    >>> destination = (52.5186, 13.4083)  # Berlin
    >>> round(distance(origin, destination), 1)
    504.2
    """
    lat1, lon1 = origin
    lat2, lon2 = destination
    radius = 6371  # km

    dlat = math.radians(lat2 - lat1)
    dlon = math.radians(lon2 - lon1)
    a = (math.sin(dlat / 2) * math.sin(dlat / 2) +
         math.cos(math.radians(lat1)) * math.cos(math.radians(lat2)) *
         math.sin(dlon / 2) * math.sin(dlon / 2))
    c = 2 * math.atan2(math.sqrt(a), math.sqrt(1 - a))
    d = radius * c

    return d


if __name__ == '__main__':
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()

The other alternative package is [haversine][1]

from haversine import haversine, Unit

lyon = (45.7597, 4.8422) # (lat, lon)
paris = (48.8567, 2.3508)

haversine(lyon, paris)
>> 392.2172595594006  # in kilometers

haversine(lyon, paris, unit=Unit.MILES)
>> 243.71201856934454  # in miles

# you can also use the string abbreviation for units:
haversine(lyon, paris, unit='mi')
>> 243.71201856934454  # in miles

haversine(lyon, paris, unit=Unit.NAUTICAL_MILES)
>> 211.78037755311516  # in nautical miles

They claim to have performance optimization for distances between all points in two vectors

from haversine import haversine_vector, Unit

lyon = (45.7597, 4.8422) # (lat, lon)
paris = (48.8567, 2.3508)
new_york = (40.7033962, -74.2351462)

haversine_vector([lyon, lyon], [paris, new_york], Unit.KILOMETERS)

>> array([ 392.21725956, 6163.43638211])
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  • Is there a way to change the given Highet of one of the points? – yovel cohen Dec 6 '19 at 20:38
10

I arrived at a much simpler and robust solution which is using geodesic from geopy package since you'll be highly likely using it in your project anyways so no extra package installation needed.

Here is my solution:

from geopy.distance import geodesic


origin = (30.172705, 31.526725)  # (latitude, longitude) don't confuse
dist = (30.288281, 31.732326)

print(geodesic(origin, dist).meters)  # 23576.805481751613
print(geodesic(origin, dist).kilometers)  # 23.576805481751613
print(geodesic(origin, dist).miles)  # 14.64994773134371

geopy

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3
import numpy as np


def Haversine(lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2, **kwarg):
    """
    This uses the ‘haversine’ formula to calculate the great-circle distance between two points – that is, 
    the shortest distance over the earth’s surface – giving an ‘as-the-crow-flies’ distance between the points 
    (ignoring any hills they fly over, of course!).
    Haversine
    formula:    a = sin²(Δφ/2) + cos φ1 ⋅ cos φ2 ⋅ sin²(Δλ/2)
    c = 2 ⋅ atan2( √a, √(1−a) )
    d = R ⋅ c
    where   φ is latitude, λ is longitude, R is earth’s radius (mean radius = 6,371km);
    note that angles need to be in radians to pass to trig functions!
    """
    R = 6371.0088
    lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2 = map(np.radians, [lat1,lon1,lat2,lon2])

    dlat = lat2 - lat1
    dlon = lon2 - lon1
    a = np.sin(dlat/2)**2 + np.cos(lat1) * np.cos(lat2) * np.sin(dlon/2) **2
    c = 2 * np.arctan2(a**0.5, (1-a)**0.5)
    d = R * c
    return round(d,4)
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