17

I'm working with a large SDK codebase glommed together from various sources of varying quality / competence / sanity from Linus Torvalds to unidentified Elbonian code slaves.

There are an assortment of styles of code, some clearly better than others, and it's proving an interesting opportunity to expand my knowledge / despair for the future of humanity in alternate measures.

I've just come across a pile of functions which repeatedly use a slightly odd (to me) style, namely:

void do_thing(foo)
{
    do {
        if(this_works(foo) != success)
            break;
        return(yeah_cool);
    } while (0);
    return(failure_shame_death);
}

There's nothing complicated being done in this code (I haven't cut 10,000 lines of wizardry out for this post), they could just as easily do:

if(this_works(foo) == success)
    return(yeah_cool);
else
    return(failure_shame_death);

Which would seem somehow nicer / neater / more intuitive / easier to read.

So I'm now wondering if there is some (good) reason for doing it the other way, or is it just the way they always do it in the Elbonian Code Mines?

Edit: As per the "possible duplicate" links, this code is not pre-processed in any sort of macro, it is just in the normal code. I can believe it might be due to a coding style rule about error checking, as per this answer.

  • 2
    Definately Elbonian code slaves. – WW. Oct 17 '13 at 10:44
  • 4
    see this: stackoverflow.com/questions/257418/… – Ferenc Deak Oct 17 '13 at 10:44
  • 2
    Voting to close (duplicate), but I love your writing style. – ixe013 Oct 17 '13 at 10:47
  • 1
    Building on what sonicwave said, a goto would have been more appropriate (everyone thinking I am joking: No, I am not.). – Sebastian Mach Oct 17 '13 at 10:54
  • 2
    I've used the while loop thingy where there are multiple points within the "loop" where I want to exit the loop and continue in normal flow. Doesn't make sense with just one condition in the loop, other than the programmer may have adopted that style and stuck with it for a bunch of functions, even when the need degenerated in some cases. The "duplicates" talk about handling macros with embedded ; characters, but the far better solution to that is to write the macro correctly, vs having to "defensively" code for it in dozens of places. – Hot Licks Oct 17 '13 at 12:12
8

Another guess: maybe you didn't quote the original code correctly? I have seen the same pattern used by people who want to avoid goto: they use a do-while(0) loop which at the end returns a success value. They can also break out of the loop for the error handling:

int doXandY() {
   do {
      if (!x()) {
         break;
     }

     if (!y()) {
         break;
     }
     return 0;
   } while( 0 );

   /* Error handling code goes here. */
   globalErrorFlag = 12345;
   return -1;
}

In your example there's not much point to it because the loop is very short (i.e. just one error case) and the error handling code is just a return, but I suspect that in the real code it can be more complex.

  • I'm pretty sure they were trying to do this. It's embarrassing how goto is such a taboo, that people would go so far just to avoid it, while essentially using it just with another keyword, i.e. break. – Shahbaz Oct 17 '13 at 12:36
  • It looks like this answer and Hot Licks comment are closest to the likely answer - some functions do have more than one error case, although I've yet to see any that are complex enough to justify this odd style. @Shahbaz - yeah, goto gets used elsewhere (presumably the Elbonians in the next cave have a different Kung Fu Style) although you're right that it's sometimes quite efficient I can never shake the feeling that there must be a better way... – John U Oct 17 '13 at 12:38
  • 1
    @JohnU, actually using goto for error handling is both quite common in C and very clean. Look at this random function I just randomly found in the kernel and imagine what a disaster it would have become to handle errors if goto was not used. – Shahbaz Oct 17 '13 at 12:43
  • I use exactly this pattern regularly. I prefer it over goto out;, (a common alternative), because once my co-workers see one goto-statement, they tend to add more and more gotos, thinking its okay. Then we end up with spaghetti code. – abelenky Oct 17 '13 at 16:10
  • @Shahbaz One thing which is better about break than goto is that the former always only jumps downwards in the code, and no further than the current loop. With goto, anything can happen and you need to look a lot more carefully. – Frerich Raabe Oct 17 '13 at 22:00
5

Hm, the code might be preprocessed somehow. The do { } while(0) is a trick used in preprocessor macros; you can define them like this:

#define some_macro(a) do { whatever(); } while(0)

The advantage being that you can use them anywhere, because it is allowed to put a semicolon after the while(0), like in your code above.

The reason for this is that if you write

#define some_macro(a) { whatever(); }

if (some_condition)
    some_macro(123);
else
    printf("this can cause problems\n");

Since there is an extra semicolon before the else statement, this code is invalid. The do { ... } while(0) will work anywhere.

  • It's a good answer, but not the case in the code I'm looking at. – John U Oct 17 '13 at 14:16
  • Yep, I realized that from reading the other answers later on :) – Johan Henriksson Oct 17 '13 at 15:23
5

Some people use the do{} while(0); construct with break; inside the loop to be compliant in some way with MISRA rule 14.7. This rule says that there can be only single enter and exit point in the function. This rule is also required by safety norm ISO26262. Please find an example function:

int32_t MODULE_some_function(bool first_condition,bool second_condition)
{
    int32_t ret = -1 ;

    do
    {
        if(first_condition)
        {
            ret = 0 ;
            break ;
        }

        /* some code here */ 

        if(second_condition)
        {
            ret = 0 ;
            break ;
        }

        /* some code here */ 

    } while(0) ;

    return ret ;
}

Please note however that such a construct as I show above violates different MISRA rule which is rule 14.6. Writing such a code you are going to be compliant with one MISRA rule, and as far as I know people use such a construct as workaround against using multiple returns from function.

In my opinion practical usage of the do{}while(0); construct truely exist in the way you should construct some types of macros.Please check below question, it was very helpful for me :

Why use apparently meaningless do-while and if-else statements in macros?

It's worth notice also that in some cases do{}while(0); construct is going to be completely optimized away if you compile your code with proper optimization option.

  • 3
    How does that illustrate the point? You could drop the do { and } while (0); and it would behave the same way. Using do { ... } while (0); like this doesn't make any sense unless there's a break; statement inside the loop. – Keith Thompson Oct 17 '13 at 15:24
  • That's true, as I said some people use this as a workaround to fulfill single enter/exit point function. If you don't use do{}while(0); construct, then probably other idea would be to use nested if's. This will be even more compliant with MISRA I'd say, but in my opinion it's harder to read. Personally I'm supporter of the multiple returns from function and honestly don't understand rationale behind single exit point from function. – Lazureus Oct 17 '13 at 15:33
  • 2
    I understand the point. What I'm saying is that your example doesn't illustrate that point. The declaration and use of ret is what avoids multiple exits; the do/while, in your example, is nothing more than noise. A valid example would have one or more break; statements inside the do/while. – Keith Thompson Oct 17 '13 at 15:37
  • Yes, that's true,I forgot about breaks actually. Thanks for noticing it. Now it should be better. – Lazureus Oct 17 '13 at 15:44
  • You can have a single-entry-single-exit function with goto just as well, I don't understand how using do-while(0) is helpful here. – Frerich Raabe Oct 18 '13 at 7:10
0

I would guess that this code was originally written with gotos for error handling:

void do_thing(foo)
{
    if(this_works(foo) != success)
        goto error;
    return(yeah_cool);
error:
    return(failure_shame_death);
}

But at some point an edict came down from on high "thou shalt not use goto", so someone did a semi-automatic translation from goto style to loop-break style (perhaps with simple script). Probably when the code was merged/moved from one project to another.

0

do {...} while(0) arranged with "break" is some kind of "RAII for Plain C".

Here, "break" is treated as abnormal scope exit (kind of "Plain C exceptions"), so you can be sure that there is only one place to deallocate a resource: after a "while(0)". It seems slightly unusual, but actually it's very common idiom in the world of plain C.

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