36

I have a very simple program in where I create a Sequelize instance and then I perform a raw query on a mysql database. The case is that when MySql is up and running there is no problem, I can perform the query with no problems. But when MySql is not running then the query doesn't emmit any error until the query timeout has reached and then it emmits a ETIMEOUT error. But that's not really what's happening. I expect the query to emit ENOTFOUND error or something like that if mysql is not running so I can manage the error and perform different actions if Mysql has gone down or Mysql is very busy and has a very large response time. What shoul'd I do to check if Mysql is up and running without having to wait the timeout exception.

sequelize = new Sequelize(db_name, db_user, db_pass, opts);

sequelize.query('SELECT * FROM some_table').success(function(result) {
  console.log(result);
}).error(function(err) {
  console.log(err);
});
2
  • You should be monitoring your MySQL server so it's up all the time, not writing application code that's needlessly paranoid. A timeout is the correct behavior for the server being down and the connection failing. You can tighten up the timeout value if it's too slow.
    – tadman
    Commented Oct 17, 2013 at 14:35
  • well in cases of paranoia, even if MySQL server is up and the query does emit an error, because of overload, its needless to say that a better database infrastructure is needed, you can use cache server such as Redis, for quicker responses, but if all your queries are like the one in your example, then its not written with performance in mind, i mean, for 10.000 rows it might be ok, but for a million rows queried every 5secs or 10secs then its not ok.. IMHO you should redesign and research for better approaches in what you are doing, i bet there is a better one.
    – Gntem
    Commented Oct 18, 2013 at 6:36

4 Answers 4

60

As of latest version of Sequelize (i.e. 3.3.2), authenticate can be used to check the connection:

var sequelize = new Sequelize("db", "user", "pass");

sequelize.authenticate().then(function(errors) { console.log(errors) });

authenticate simply runs SELECT 1+1 AS result query to check the db connection.

UPDATE:

Errors by the newest API need to be handled in catch:

sequelize
  .authenticate()
  .then(() => {
    console.log('Connection has been established successfully.');
  })
  .catch(err => {
    console.error('Unable to connect to the database:', err);
  });

UPDATE 2:

I haven't tested this, but its only logical that the same thing can be reached with async/await:

try {
  await sequelize.authenticate()
} catch (err) {
  console.error('Unable to connect to the database:', err)
}
1
  • 2
    @TiagoGouvêa the old API returned the error in then. The newer ones use proper promises!
    – Yan Foto
    Commented Mar 21, 2018 at 16:04
9

You won't see errors, like password authentication errors, in .then.

From the sequelize documentation here:

You can use the .authenticate() function like this to test the connection.

sequelize
  .authenticate()
  .then(function(err) {
    console.log('Connection has been established successfully.');
  })
  .catch(function (err) {
    console.log('Unable to connect to the database:', err);
  });
0

Please check "wait_timeout" system variable if its been reset to some trivial value

0

I use the following code to wait for the db engine to start:

function sleep(ms) {

    return new Promise(function(resolve) {

        setTimeout(resolve, ms);
    });
}

for (;;) {

    try {

        await db.authenticate();
        break;
    } catch(ex) {

        await sleep(1000);
    }
}
1
  • 2
    Ideally there'd be a max-tries limit on these kind of loops :) Commented Nov 11, 2020 at 14:32

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