I'm trying to create an asynchronous console app that does a some work on a collection. I have one version which uses parallel for loop another version that uses async/await. I expected the async/await version to work similar to parallel version but it executes synchronously. What am I doing wrong?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var worker = new Worker();
        worker.ParallelInit();
        var t = worker.Init();
        t.Wait();
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public class Worker
{
    public async Task<bool> Init()
    {
        var series = Enumerable.Range(1, 5).ToList();
        foreach (var i in series)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Starting Process {0}", i);
            var result = await DoWorkAsync(i);
            if (result)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Ending Process {0}", i);
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    public async Task<bool> DoWorkAsync(int i)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("working..{0}", i);
        await Task.Delay(1000);
        return true;
    }

    public bool ParallelInit()
    {
        var series = Enumerable.Range(1, 5).ToList();
        Parallel.ForEach(series, i =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Starting Process {0}", i);
            DoWorkAsync(i);
            Console.WriteLine("Ending Process {0}", i);
        });
        return true;
    }
}
up vote 85 down vote accepted

The way you're using the await keyword tells C# that you want to wait each time you pass through the loop, which isn't parallel. You can rewrite your method like this to do what you want, by storing a list of Tasks and then awaiting them all with Task.WhenAll.

public async Task<bool> Init()
{
    var series = Enumerable.Range(1, 5).ToList();
    var tasks = new List<Task<Tuple<int, bool>>>();
    foreach (var i in series)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Starting Process {0}", i);
        tasks.Add(DoWorkAsync(i));
    }
    foreach (var task in await Task.WhenAll(tasks))
    {
        if (task.Item2)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Ending Process {0}", task.Item1);
        }
    }
    return true;
}

public async Task<Tuple<int, bool>> DoWorkAsync(int i)
{
    Console.WriteLine("working..{0}", i);
    await Task.Delay(1000);
    return Tuple.Create(i, true);
}
  • 2
    I don't know about others, but a parallel for/foreach seems more straight forward for parallel loops. – Brettski Feb 13 '14 at 19:07
  • 4
    Important to note that when you see the Ending Process notification isn't when the task is actually ending. All of those notifications are dumped out sequentially right after the last of the tasks finishes. By the time you see "Ending Process 1", process 1 might have been over for a long time. Other than the choice of words there, +1. – Asad Saeeduddin Apr 17 '14 at 0:31
  • @Brettski I may be wrong, but a parallel loop traps any sort of async result. By returning a Task<T> you immediately get back a Task object in which you can manage the work that is going on inside such as cancelling it or seeing exceptions. Now with Async/Await you can work with the Task object in a more friendly manner - that is you don't have to do Task.Result. – The Muffin Man Jan 21 '15 at 17:53
  • @Tim S, what if I want to return a value with async function using Tasks.WhenAll method? – Mihir Apr 10 at 13:59
  • Would it be a bad practice to implement a Semaphore in DoWorkAsync to limit the maximum executing tasks? – Tpx May 31 at 6:31

Your code waits for each operation (using await) to finish before starting the next iteration.
Therefore, you don't get any parallelism.

If you want to run an existing asynchronous operation in parallel, you don't need await; you just need to get a collection of Tasks and call Task.WhenAll() to return a task that waits for all of them:

return Task.WhenAll(list.Select(DoWorkAsync));
  • so you cant use any asynchronous methods in any loops? – Satish Oct 17 '13 at 15:57
  • 4
    @Satish: You can. However, await does the exact opposite of what you want – it waits for the Task to finish. – SLaks Oct 17 '13 at 15:58
  • I wanted to accept your answer but Tims S has a better answer. – Satish Oct 17 '13 at 16:09
  • Or if you don't need to know when the task finished you can just call the methods without awaiting for them – disklosr Mar 25 '16 at 7:27
  • To confirm what that syntax is doing - it's running the Task called DoWorkAsync on each item in list (passing each item into DoWorkAsync, which I assume has a single parameter)? – jbyrd Jan 4 at 18:37
public async Task<bool> Init()
{
    var series = Enumerable.Range(1, 5);
    Task.WhenAll(series.Select(i => DoWorkAsync(i)));
    return true;
}

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