12

I wonder is it possible to execute some callback only once after evaluation all (or only some) attributes of directive (without isolated scope). Attributes are really great to pass configuration to the directive. The thing is that you can observe each attribute separately and fire callback several times.

In the example we have a directive without isolated scope which observs two attributes: name and surname. After any change action callback is fired:

html

<button ng-click="name='John';surname='Brown'">Change all params</button>
<div person name="{{name}}" surname="{{surname}}"></div>

js

angular.module('app', []).

directive('person', function() {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function($scope, $elem, $attrs) {
        var action = function() {
          $elem.append('name: ' + $attrs.name + '<br/> surname: ' + $attrs.surname+'<br/><br/>');
        }
        $attrs.$observe('name', action);
        $attrs.$observe('surname', action);
    }
 }
});

Plunker here.

So the effect is that after changing name and surname during one click, action callback is fired twice:

name: 
surname: Brown

name: John
surname: Brown

So the question is: can action be fired only once with both name and surname values changed?

5 Answers 5

12

You can use $watch to evaluate a custom function rather than a specific model.

i.e.

$scope.$watch(function () {
  return [$attrs.name, $attrs.surname];
}, action, true);

That will be run on all $digest cycles, and if $watch detects the return array (or however you want to structure your function's return value) doesn't match the old value, the callback argument to $watch will fire. If you do use an object as the return value though, make sure to leave the true value in for the last argument to $watch so that $watch will do a deep compare.

0
0

Underscore (or lo-dash) has a once function. If you wrap your function inside once you can ensure your function will be called only once.

angular.module('app', []).

directive('person', function() {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function($scope, $elem, $attrs) {
        var action = function() {
          $elem.append('name: ' + $attrs.name + '<br/> surname: ' + $attrs.surname+'<br/><br/>');
        }
        var once = _.once(action);
        $attrs.$observe('name', once);
        $attrs.$observe('surname', once);
    }
 }
});
1
  • 2
    Unfortunately _.once will fire callback only once but only with the first attribute changed. My point is that callback should be fired after all changes during single $digest phase.
    – kseb
    Oct 18, 2013 at 10:45
0

So, I've ended up with my own implementation of observeAll method, which can wait for several changes of attributes during one call stack. It works however I'm not sure about performance.

Solution of @cmw seems to be simpler but performance can suffer for large number of parameters and multiple $digest phase runs, when object equality is evaluated many many times. However I decided to accept his answer.

Below you can find my approach:

angular.module('utils.observeAll', []).

factory('observeAll', ['$rootScope', function($rootScope) {
    return function($attrs, callback) {
        var o = {}, 
            callQueued = false, 
            args = arguments,

            observe = function(attr) {
                $attrs.$observe(attr, function(value) {
                    o[attr] = value;
                    if (!callQueued) {
                        callQueued = true;
                        $rootScope.$evalAsync(function() {
                            var argArr = [];
                            for(var i = 2, max = args.length; i < max; i++) {
                                var attr = args[i];
                                argArr.push(o[attr]);
                            }
                            callback.apply(null, argArr);
                            callQueued = false;
                        });
                    }
                });
            };

        for(var i = 2, max = args.length; i < max; i++) {
            var attr = args[i];
            if ($attrs.$attr[attr])
                observe(attr);
        }
    };
}]);

And you can use it in your directive:

angular.module('app', ['utils.observeAll']).

directive('person', ['observeAll', function(observeAll) {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function($scope, $elem, $attrs) {
        var action = function() {
          $elem.append('name: ' + $attrs.name + '<br/> surname: ' + $attrs.surname+'<br/><br/>');
        }
        observeAll($attrs, action, 'name', 'surname');
    }
 }
}]);

Plunker here

0

I resolved the exact same problem that I had using another approach, though I was looking for different ideas. While cmw's suggestions is working, I compared its performance against mine, and saw that the $watch method is called far too many times, so I decided to keep things the way I had implemented.

I added $observe calls for both variables I wanted to track and bound them to a debounce call. Since they both are modified with very little time difference, both $observe methods trigger the same function call, which gets executed after a short delay:

var debounceUpdate = _.debounce(function () {
    setMinAndMaxValue(attrs['minFieldName'], attrs['maxFieldName']);
}, 100);

attrs.$observe('minFieldName', function () {
    debounceUpdate();
});

attrs.$observe('maxFieldName', function () {
    debounceUpdate();
});
0

There are several ways presented to solve this problem. I liked the debounce solution a lot. However, here is my solution to this problem. This combines all the attributes in one single attribute and creates a JSON representation of the attributes that you are interested in. Now, you just need to $observe one attribute and have good perf too!

Here is a fork of the original plunkr with the implementation: linkhttp://plnkr.co/edit/un3iPL2dfmSn1QJ4zWjQ

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