1

There seem to be two approaches to dynamically adding elements to tables

table.insert(t, index, value) -- optional index

and

t[#t+1] = value

according to the docs if the index is left off, table.insert(t, value) should behave exactly like t[#t+1] = value.

For some reason even though I only store two values in my table, I see four entries when I iterate through with ipairs:

words = {}
for i = 0, 1 do  
   local word = io.read()   -- word is familiarize
   table.insert(words , word)
   -- american to english spelling
   word = word:gsub("ze","se") 
   table.insert(words , word)
end

for i,v in ipairs(words) do
    print(i,v)
end

-- prints
-- 1    
-- 2    
-- 3    familiarize
-- 4    familiarise

Any idea where these extra two entries come from?

  • Did you meant to insert into the table words and not the table t? – Anko Oct 17 '13 at 21:05
  • 3
    You call .insert twice, in a loop that runs twice. So naturally you will have four elements... – nneonneo Oct 17 '13 at 21:08
  • @Anko Yes that was a typo. – Hunter McMillen Oct 17 '13 at 21:10
3

(I'm assuming you meant to insert into words, not t.)

You're still going twice around that loop; once for i == 0 and once for i == 1. We can add some prints to demonstrate:

words = {}
for i = 0, 1 do
    print "inserting two..."
    local word = "familiarize"
    table.insert(words, word)
    -- american to english spelling
    word = word:gsub("ze","se")
    table.insert(words, word)
end

for i,v in ipairs(words) do
    print(i,v)
end

This gives the following output:

inserting two...
inserting two...
1   familiarize
2   familiarise
3   familiarize
4   familiarise

That should make things clearer.

  • interesting, I was not seeing that result. I also was under the impression that for i = 0, 1 executed once. Thanks. – Hunter McMillen Oct 17 '13 at 21:13
  • Yep. In Lua, the for _ = a,b construct includes both end values. This is unlike most C-ish languages, where you might do for (i=0;i<1;i++) and expect the loop to run just for i == 0. This is because including both ends works better with Lua's 1-based array indices (C's are 0-based). – Anko Oct 17 '13 at 21:17

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