What is the operator =~ called? Is it only used to compare the right side against the left side?

Why are double square brackets required when running a test?

ie. [[ $phrase =~ $keyword ]]

Thank you

up vote 39 down vote accepted
  1. What is the operator =~ called?

    I'm not sure it has a name. The bash documentation just calls it the =~ operator.

  2. Is it only used to compare the right side against the left side?

    The right side is considered an extended regular expression. If the left side matches, the operator returns 0, and 1 otherwise.

  3. Why are double square brackets required when running a test?

    Because =~ is an operator of the [[ expression ]] compound command.

  • 5
    If the left side matches, the operator returns 0 or 1 as you say, but it also sets the BASH_REMATCH array, which bears mentioning. Also, [[ is not a command – It's a keyword. – kojiro Oct 18 '13 at 4:34
  • Yup - all further information available at the doc link above. – Carl Norum Oct 18 '13 at 4:34
  • 1
    bash is weird. type [[ says that [[ is a shell keyword, but the manpage does refer to [[ as a conditional command at least once. Meh. – kojiro Oct 18 '13 at 4:36
  • 5
    [[ is a shell keyword which introduces a compound command [[ ... ]], just like if is a shell keyword that introduces the if..then..fi compound command. – chepner Oct 18 '13 at 12:45
  • perhaps it is called the Equal Tilde operator – serup Feb 26 '16 at 7:34

The =~ operator is a regular expression match operator. This operator is inspired by Perl's use of the same operator for regular expression matching.

The [[ ]] is treated specially by bash; consider that an augmented version of [ ] construct:

  • [ ] is actually a shell built-in command, which, can actually be implemented as an external command. Look at your /usr/bin, there is most likely a program called "[" there! Strictly speaking, [ ] is not part of bash syntax.

  • [[ ]] is a shell keyword, which means it is part of shell syntax. Inside this construct, some reserved characters change meaning. For example, ( ) means parenthesis like other programming language (not launching a subshell to execute what's inside the paretheses). Another example is that < and > means less than and greater than, not shell redirection. This allow more "natural" appearance of logical expressions, but it can be confusing for novice bash programmers.

Wirawan

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