0
1. { :a => 10 } #=> no error
2. { a: 10 }    #=> no error

3. { :"str" => 10 } #=> no error
4. { "str": 10 }    #=> syntax error, unexpected ':', expecting =>

Isn't 4. same as 2? Why 2 is working and 4 throws syntax error?

1
  • Can somebody explain which part of the question qualifies to receive a downvote? – RubyNoobie Oct 18 '13 at 6:51
3

My understanding is that {"key": value} is not a valid syntax as it is not clear whether it means {:"key" => value} or {"key" => value}

There is a discussion on this here. Quote from Matz in the discussion

| Iff {'key': 'value'} means {:key => 'value'} I have no objection.

| Won't that be misleading? I think the OP wants {'key': 'value'} to mean {'key' => 'value}

But considering the fact that {key: "value"} is a shorthand for {:key => "value"}, {"key": "value"} should be a shorthand for {:"key" => "value"}. Besides that, since it reminds me JSON so much, making a: and "a": different could cause more confusion than the above misleading.

          matz.
2

Hash: Hashes allow an alternate syntax form when your keys are always symbols.

options = { :font_size => 10, :font_family => "Arial" }

You could write it as:

options = { font_size: 10, font_family: "Arial" }

In your first 3 cases all are symbols in key position,but the fourth is a string instance,not the symbol instance as key.That's the reason 4th case is invalid Ruby syntax.

{ :a => 10 }.keys[0].class # => Symbol
{ a: 10 }.keys[0].class    # => Symbol
{ :"str" => 10 }.keys[0].class # => Symbol
1

No. (1) is standard symbol, (2) is shorthand 1.9 syntax for symbol-key hashes, (3) is shorthand for "str".to_sym, (4) does not exist and you should use the hashrocket.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.