10

When using soft deletes and route to model binding their arises a circumstance when you cannot view the injected model if it has been "soft deleted".

e.g.

I have a Job model. if i "trash" one of these models and then open the trash and try to view the Job model i get a 404 resource not found. I resolved this by using the Route::bind() function as such

Route::bind('job', function($id, $route) {

    return Job::withTrashed()->find($id);
});

although this seems unnecessary and a little silly... is there a way around this so i can use the very eloquent one line binding:

Route::model('job', 'Job');
3
  • 1
    i never knew soft delete existed -that's awesome. I've not tested this yet, but I think you are doing it exactly right. The docs say "Sometimes you may wish to use your own resolver for route parameters." and post-soft-delete may just be one of those times. I think all Route::bind('foo',Foo) does is to define what Class or Type to use in your route... the actual object has to come from somewhere, and for your single job, the db call is no big deal. A single callback is still pretty friggin eloquent, too - imagine all the procedural code it would take to mimic that behaviour without laravel
    – Ryan
    Oct 18 '13 at 10:43
  • 1
    Good point. Procedural this simple concept would be an epic undertaking... Laravel has made me love PHP again. Oct 18 '13 at 12:19
  • This question is the third Google result for "laravel route withtrashed" and provides an excellent answer to it - thank you for that!
    – damaxxed
    May 3 '14 at 15:49
5

What you've outlined in your question seems to solve it.

A slight refinement is that you may want to specify which specific key to include the trashed models.

E.g. have normal route model bind like so:

Route::model('job', 'Job');

And define another key like 'anyjob' where you allow trashed jobs to be queried also:

Route::bind('anyjob', function($id) {    
    return Job::withTrashed()->find($id);
});

Then for routes where you don't want to include trashed jobs you just reference job:

get('/jobs/{job}/edit', ['controller' => 'JobsController@edit']); // We don't want to be able to edit a trashed job.

And only reference the anyjob binding for routes where a trashed job is acceptable:

delete('/jobs/{anyjob}', ['controller' => 'JobsController@destroy']); // we could then forceDelete the trashed job for example as it'll be correctly injected in out our controller method

This prevents you ending up with soft-deleted models in controller methods that should otherwise not deal with them. You specify the exact routes which could accept any job, or even just trashed jobs.

4

As Route::model() is using the find method on the model you can simply override the method to retrieve trashed objects:

class Job extends Eloquent
{
    public static function find($id, $columns = array('*'))
    {
        return parent::withTrashed()->find($id, $columns);
    }
}

Now you can use model bindings without closures

Route::model('job', 'Job');

Be careful while using the find method where you don't want to retrieve trashed objects.

1
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    This does not appear true for Laravel 5. It seems to use it's own keyname with a where in the Router::model() function. Just commenting for anyone else stumbling on this who uses Laravel 5. Sep 24 '15 at 13:00
1

In addition to this if you've built your own traits and scopes, you can define the find function in there. For instance I have an "approvedTrait" which works the same way but with an "approved" column to show whether something has been approved by a moderator. I then simply put this in my approvedTrait class:

public static function find($id, $columns = array('*'))
{
    return self::withUnapproved()->find($id, $columns);
}

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