322
votes

I collect a few corner cases and brain teasers and would always like to hear more. The page only really covers C# language bits and bobs, but I also find core .NET things interesting too. For example, here's one which isn't on the page, but which I find incredible:

string x = new string(new char[0]);
string y = new string(new char[0]);
Console.WriteLine(object.ReferenceEquals(x, y));

I'd expect that to print False - after all, "new" (with a reference type) always creates a new object, doesn't it? The specs for both C# and the CLI indicate that it should. Well, not in this particular case. It prints True, and has done on every version of the framework I've tested it with. (I haven't tried it on Mono, admittedly...)

Just to be clear, this is only an example of the kind of thing I'm looking for - I wasn't particularly looking for discussion/explanation of this oddity. (It's not the same as normal string interning; in particular, string interning doesn't normally happen when a constructor is called.) I was really asking for similar odd behaviour.

Any other gems lurking out there?

closed as not constructive by Tim Post May 2 '11 at 4:39

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  • 64
    Tested on Mono 2.0 rc; returns True – Marc Gravell Oct 11 '08 at 21:35
  • 10
    both strings end up being string.Empty and it appears that the framework keeps only one reference to that – Adrian Zanescu Jan 14 '09 at 15:49
  • 34
    It's a memory conservation thing. Look up the MSDN documentation for the static method string.Intern. The CLR maintains a string pool. That's why strings with identical content shows up as references to the same memory i.e. object. – John Leidegren Feb 23 '09 at 12:48
  • 12
    @John: String interning only happens automatically for literals. That's not the case here. @DanielSwe: Interning isn't required for making strings immutable. The fact that it's possible is a nice corollary of immutability, but normal interning isn't happening here anyway. – Jon Skeet Mar 25 '09 at 15:27
  • 3
    The implementation detail that causes this behavior is explained here: blog.liranchen.com/2010/08/brain-teasing-with-strings.html – Liran Sep 14 '10 at 18:00

37 Answers 37

2
votes

The following doesn't work:

if (something)
    doit();
else
    var v = 1 + 2;

But this works:

if (something)
    doit();
else {
    var v = 1 + 2;
}
  • 12
    I don't see how it is a corner case... In the first example, there is no way you can use the v variable, since its scope is the else block and you can only have one instruction in it if you don't put braces – Thomas Levesque Aug 10 '10 at 15:44
  • i don't see the difference of the two code snippet. – Benny Aug 11 '10 at 6:22
  • @Thomas: Yes, but why is that an error? I might have wanted to add the statement just to be able to break in the else clause. In C++ this is perfectly valid. I find it discomforting that there is a semantic difference between else {} and else when there is only one statement in the clause. – Anders Rune Jensen Aug 11 '10 at 8:39
  • 1
    @Anders: Your answers put a lot of focus on the fact that C# differs from C++ like here: stackoverflow.com/questions/194484/… This thread isn't about the differences between C# and C++. An edge case in C# isn't a difference from C++. Others have noted you will find answers in the C# spec. – John K Aug 11 '10 at 13:04
  • @jdk: I added the C++ note for completeness. I agree that it might not be the biggest edge case I have seen, it just suprised me when I found it yesterday. – Anders Rune Jensen Aug 11 '10 at 19:18
2
votes

here are a few of mine:

  1. this can be null when calling an instance method with out a NullReferenceException being thrown
  2. a default enumeration value doesn't have to be defined for the enumeration

Simple one first: enum NoZero { Number = 1 }

        public bool ReturnsFalse()
        {
            //The default value is not defined!
            return Enum.IsDefined(typeof (NoZero), default(NoZero));
        }

The below code can actually print true!

 internal sealed class Strange
{
    public void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(this == null);
    }
}

A simple piece of client code that will result in that is delegate void HelloDelegate(Strange bar);

public class Program
{
    [STAThread()]
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Strange bar = null;
        var hello = new DynamicMethod("ThisIsNull",
            typeof(void), new[] { typeof(Strange) },
         typeof(Strange).Module);
        ILGenerator il = hello.GetILGenerator(256);
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
        var foo = typeof(Strange).GetMethod("Foo");
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Call, foo);
        il.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        var print = (HelloDelegate)hello.CreateDelegate(typeof(HelloDelegate));
        print(bar);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

this is actually true in most languages as long as the instance method when called doesn't use the state of the object. this is only dereferenced when the state of the object is accessed

  • 4
    The enum case isn't actually surprising, the default underlaying type of an enum is int, so default of the enum will return 0, which is quite undefined in NoZero indeed. Even by specifying a custom type (within byte, sbyte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, or ulong) to your enum, the default value of all those type is still 0. – Dynami Le Savard Oct 14 '10 at 16:35
  • @Dynami yes it's because of the default value of the underlying type but (to me) it's rather senseless to have an invalid default value for a valuetype it's kind of having (1,-1) as default for int. The value simply makes no sense in the context of the given type – Rune FS Oct 14 '10 at 17:40
2
votes

This one is pretty straightforward but I still find it somewhat interesting. What would be the value of x after the call to Foo?

static int x = 0;

public static void Foo()
{
    try { return; }
    finally { x = 1; }
}

static void Main() { Foo(); }
  • 5
    What's the corner case in your answer? – Cheng Chen Feb 9 '11 at 5:04
  • Maxim: Right. Danny: That's not exactly a corner case, but it goes together with corner cases - that's a thing that not easy to track back, especially when you work with someone's code. – Andrew Sevastian Feb 9 '11 at 23:23
1
vote

If you have the extension method:

public static bool? ToBoolean(this string s)
{
    bool result;

    if (bool.TryParse(s, out result))
        return result;
    else
        return null;
}

and this code:

string nullStr = null;
var res = nullStr.ToBoolean();

This will not throw an exception because it is an extension method (and really HelperClass.ToBoolean(null)) and not an instance method. This can be confusing.

  • I don't think this is a strange corner-case, more run of the mill syntax design. This behaviour allows you to do things like static void IfNotNull<T>(Action<T> action)... If your extension method has a problem with a null this parameter then throw an ArgumentNullException. – Keith Aug 22 '10 at 21:39
  • @Keith It can certainly be useful but when you look at it (from a Java, C++, C# 2 perspective) it will be a strange thing and as a C# 3+ developer you would still have to check whether this is indeed a extension method (not on strings, but on more advanced examples) and not an instance method where they (others code) forgot a null-check. – Lasse Espeholt Aug 23 '10 at 4:25
  • 1
    I guess my point is that the extension method way of working is better in all the places where you would use one rather than an instance method. Take your example method: it returns a bool? - it's quite acceptable (even preferred) for your nullStr.ToBoolean() to return null, rather than have it throw a NullReferenceException – Keith Aug 23 '10 at 12:57
  • 1
    I think he's saying if you were inheriting code, and saw the snippet without knowing the extension method definition, it would be confusing. – Michael Blackburn Apr 3 '11 at 4:30
  • I think they should have used another symbol. Like piping in F#. nullStr|>ToBoolean or nullStr->ToBoolean. – Lasse Espeholt Apr 3 '11 at 18:31
-4
votes

The following prints False instead of throwing an overflow exception:

Console.WriteLine("{0}", yep(int.MaxValue ));


private bool yep( int val )
{
    return ( 0 < val * 2);
}
  • 2
    You can have your OverflowException by wrapping the test in checked{}, or setting the appropriate compiler option. It's not immediately obvious why the default is unchecked... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/khy08726(VS.71).aspx – stevemegson Nov 5 '08 at 22:53
  • 7
    The default is unchecked because the performance hit for doing this check on every integer operation in code is expensive. – Peter Oehlert Dec 23 '08 at 17:38
  • Also, the default for VB is to have it all checked. C# compiler team made a different choice for their default trying to more closely what their target audience would expect. – Peter Oehlert Dec 23 '08 at 17:39
  • 9
    int.MaxValue * 2 is a negative number in unchecked arithmetic, which is the default in C#, there for the comparison returns false. This is not unexpected behavior :P – Lucas Jun 12 '09 at 18:38
-4
votes

This one had me truly puzzled (I apologise for the length but it's WinForm). I posted it in the newsgroups a while back.

I've come across an interesting bug. I have workarounds but i'd like to know the root of the problem. I've stripped it down into a short file and hope someone might have an idea about what's going on.

It's a simple program that loads a control onto a form and binds "Foo" against a combobox ("SelectedItem") for it's "Bar" property and a datetimepicker ("Value") for it's "DateTime" property. The DateTimePicker.Visible value is set to false. Once it's loaded up, select the combobox and then attempt to deselect it by selecting the checkbox. This is rendered impossible by the combobox retaining the focus, you cannot even close the form, such is it's grasp on the focus.

I have found three ways of fixing this problem.

a) Remove the binding to Bar (a bit obvious)

b) Remove the binding to DateTime

c) Make the DateTimePicker visible !?!

I'm currently running Win2k. And .NET 2.00, I think 1.1 has the same problem. Code is below.

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WindowsApplication6
{
    public class Bar
    {
        public Bar()
        {
        }
    }

    public class Foo
    {
        private Bar m_Bar = new Bar();
        private DateTime m_DateTime = DateTime.Now;

        public Foo()
        {
        }

        public Bar Bar
        {
            get
            {
                return m_Bar;
            }
            set
            {
                m_Bar = value;
            }
        }

        public DateTime DateTime
        {
            get
            {
                return m_DateTime;
            }
            set
            {
                m_DateTime = value;
            }
        }
    }

    public class TestBugControl : UserControl
    {
        public TestBugControl()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        public void InitializeData(IList types)
        {
            this.cBoxType.DataSource = types;
        }

        public void BindFoo(Foo foo)
        {
            this.cBoxType.DataBindings.Add("SelectedItem", foo, "Bar");
            this.dtStart.DataBindings.Add("Value", foo, "DateTime");
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Required designer variable.
        /// </summary>
        private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean up any resources being used.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">true if managed resources should be disposed; otherwise, false.</param>
        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing && (components != null))
            {
                components.Dispose();
            }
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }

        #region Component Designer generated code

        /// <summary>
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify
        /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.checkBox1 = new System.Windows.Forms.CheckBox();
            this.cBoxType = new System.Windows.Forms.ComboBox();
            this.dtStart = new System.Windows.Forms.DateTimePicker();
            this.SuspendLayout();
            //
            // checkBox1
            //
            this.checkBox1.AutoSize = true;
            this.checkBox1.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(14, 5);
            this.checkBox1.Name = "checkBox1";
            this.checkBox1.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(97, 20);
            this.checkBox1.TabIndex = 0;
            this.checkBox1.Text = "checkBox1";
            this.checkBox1.UseVisualStyleBackColor = true;
            //
            // cBoxType
            //
            this.cBoxType.FormattingEnabled = true;
            this.cBoxType.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(117, 3);
            this.cBoxType.Name = "cBoxType";
            this.cBoxType.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(165, 24);
            this.cBoxType.TabIndex = 1;
            //
            // dtStart
            //
            this.dtStart.Location = new System.Drawing.Point(117, 40);
            this.dtStart.Name = "dtStart";
            this.dtStart.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(165, 23);
            this.dtStart.TabIndex = 2;
            this.dtStart.Visible = false;
            //
            // TestBugControl
            //
            this.AutoScaleDimensions = new System.Drawing.SizeF(8F, 16F);
            this.AutoScaleMode = System.Windows.Forms.AutoScaleMode.Font;
            this.Controls.Add(this.dtStart);
            this.Controls.Add(this.cBoxType);
            this.Controls.Add(this.checkBox1);
            this.Font = new System.Drawing.Font("Verdana", 9.75F,
            System.Drawing.FontStyle.Regular, System.Drawing.GraphicsUnit.Point,
            ((byte)(0)));
            this.Margin = new System.Windows.Forms.Padding(4);
            this.Name = "TestBugControl";
            this.Size = new System.Drawing.Size(285, 66);
            this.ResumeLayout(false);
            this.PerformLayout();

        }

        #endregion

        private System.Windows.Forms.CheckBox checkBox1;
        private System.Windows.Forms.ComboBox cBoxType;
        private System.Windows.Forms.DateTimePicker dtStart;
    }

    public class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            this.Load += new EventHandler(Form1_Load);
        }

        void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            InitializeControl();
        }

        public void InitializeControl()
        {
            TestBugControl control = new TestBugControl();
            IList list = new ArrayList();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                list.Add(new Bar());
            }
            control.InitializeData(list);
            control.BindFoo(new Foo());
            this.Controls.Add(control);
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Required designer variable.
        /// </summary>
        private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean up any resources being used.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">true if managed resources should be disposed; otherwise, false.</param>
        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing && (components != null))
            {
                components.Dispose();
            }
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }

        #region Windows Form Designer generated code

        /// <summary>
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify
        /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.components = new System.ComponentModel.Container();
            this.AutoScaleMode = System.Windows.Forms.AutoScaleMode.Font;
            this.Text = "Form1";
        }

        #endregion
    }

    static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }
    }
}
-18
votes

I think the answer to the question is because .net uses string interning something that might cause equal strings to point to the same object (since a strings are mutable this is not a problem)

(I'm not talking about the overridden equality operator on the string class)

  • 15
    Strings are immutable, not mutable. And this isn't "normal" string interning - it only occurs when you pass in an empty char array. However, the question isn't really "why does this happen?" but "what similar things have you seen?" – Jon Skeet Oct 12 '08 at 18:04
  • 10
    Reminds me of how any discussion of the Fizz Buzz problem leads to at least half the responses being solutions of the problem. – Wedge Oct 14 '08 at 1:41
  • 2
    Half of which were incorrect. – Joe Aug 20 '10 at 20:24

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