51

What's the most efficient way to drop only consecutive duplicates in pandas?

drop_duplicates gives this:

In [3]: a = pandas.Series([1,2,2,3,2], index=[1,2,3,4,5])

In [4]: a.drop_duplicates()
Out[4]: 
1    1
2    2
4    3
dtype: int64

But I want this:

In [4]: a.something()
Out[4]: 
1    1
2    2
4    3
5    2
dtype: int64
74

Use shift:

a.loc[a.shift(-1) != a]

Out[3]:

1    1
3    2
4    3
5    2
dtype: int64

So the above uses boolean critieria, we compare the dataframe against the dataframe shifted by -1 rows to create the mask

Another method is to use diff:

In [82]:

a.loc[a.diff() != 0]
Out[82]:
1    1
2    2
4    3
5    2
dtype: int64

But this is slower than the original method if you have a large number of rows.

Update

Thanks to Bjarke Ebert for pointing out a subtle error, I should actually use shift(1) or just shift() as the default is a period of 1, this returns the first consecutive value:

In [87]:

a.loc[a.shift() != a]
Out[87]:
1    1
2    2
4    3
5    2
dtype: int64

Note the difference in index values, thanks @BjarkeEbert!

  • 2
    Also, df.col != df.col.shift() is much more general. Using diff only works for integers whereas shift works for floats, strings, etc. – exp1orer Jan 6 '15 at 22:40
  • Thats a great solution. But here the problem has only one column. What if there are multiple columns ? Should shift work ? I am getting ValueError: Cannot index with multidimensional key – Run2 Jan 13 '16 at 5:37
  • @Run2 it won't work in that case, if you have a question then you should post a question, difficult to comment without seeing an example – EdChum - Reinstate Monica Jan 13 '16 at 9:05
  • Well - what I did was - I created a new column which joined all the other columns. And then I used as below df = df.loc[df['allthecols'].shift() != df['allthecols']] – Run2 Jan 13 '16 at 12:27
  • 2
    @PyNoob You'd have to do a.loc[(a.notnull()) & (a.shift() != a)] to handle the NaN rows – EdChum - Reinstate Monica Oct 19 '16 at 19:49
10

Here is an update that will make it work with multiple columns. Use ".any(axis=1)" to combine the results from each column:

cols = ["col1","col2","col3"]
de_dup = a[cols].loc[(a[cols].shift() != a[cols]).any(axis=1)]
  • this seem to cause a KeyError – Roxanne Jul 3 '17 at 11:42
  • 1
    Can you add a bit more context? – johnml1135 Jul 3 '17 at 12:42
  • Works too well, I have 4 columns and need to remove the 'next' row if 3 columns match. johnml's worked but I lost the 4th column. – Arthur D. Howland Mar 26 at 13:34
  • @ArthurD.Howland you can do de_dup = a.loc[(a[cols].shift() != a[cols]).any(axis=1)] – groceryheist Aug 25 at 19:03
4

Since we are going for most efficient way, i.e. performance, let's use array data to leverage NumPy. We will slice one-off slices and compare, similar to shifting method discussed earlier in @EdChum's post. But with NumPy slicing we would end up with one-less array, so we need to concatenate with a True element at the start to select the first element and hence we would have an implementation like so -

def drop_consecutive_duplicates(a):
    ar = a.values
    return a[np.concatenate(([True],ar[:-1]!= ar[1:]))]

Sample run -

In [149]: a
Out[149]: 
1    1
2    2
3    2
4    3
5    2
dtype: int64

In [150]: drop_consecutive_duplicates(a)
Out[150]: 
1    1
2    2
4    3
5    2
dtype: int64

Timings on large arrays comparing @EdChum's solution -

In [142]: a = pd.Series(np.random.randint(1,5,(1000000)))

In [143]: %timeit a.loc[a.shift() != a]
100 loops, best of 3: 12.1 ms per loop

In [144]: %timeit drop_consecutive_duplicates(a)
100 loops, best of 3: 11 ms per loop

In [145]: a = pd.Series(np.random.randint(1,5,(10000000)))

In [146]: %timeit a.loc[a.shift() != a]
10 loops, best of 3: 136 ms per loop

In [147]: %timeit drop_consecutive_duplicates(a)
10 loops, best of 3: 114 ms per loop

So, there's some improvement!

Get major boost for values only!

If only the values are needed, we could get major boost by simply indexing into the array data, like so -

def drop_consecutive_duplicates(a):
    ar = a.values
    return ar[np.concatenate(([True],ar[:-1]!= ar[1:]))]

Sample run -

In [170]: a = pandas.Series([1,2,2,3,2], index=[1,2,3,4,5])

In [171]: drop_consecutive_duplicates(a)
Out[171]: array([1, 2, 3, 2])

Timings -

In [173]: a = pd.Series(np.random.randint(1,5,(10000000)))

In [174]: %timeit a.loc[a.shift() != a]
10 loops, best of 3: 137 ms per loop

In [175]: %timeit drop_consecutive_duplicates(a)
10 loops, best of 3: 61.3 ms per loop
  • I do not understand why timing for [147] and [175] differ? Can you explain what change have you made cuz I dont see any? Perhaps a typo? – Biarys Feb 7 at 3:38
  • Also, will your function work for dataframes? – Biarys Feb 7 at 3:40
  • @Biarys [175] is with the modified Get major boost for values only! section one, hence the time diff. The original one works on pandas-Series whereas the modified one on array as also listed in the post. – Divakar Feb 7 at 8:38
  • Oh I see. Hard to notice change from return a[...] vs return ar[....]. Does your function work for dataframes? – Biarys Feb 8 at 13:01
  • @Biarys For dataframes, if you are looking for duplicate rows, we simply need to use slicing : ar[:,:-1]!= ar[:,1:], alongwith ALL reduction. – Divakar Feb 8 at 15:32
0

For other Stack explorers, building off johnml1135's answer above. This will remove the next duplicate from multiple columns but not drop all of the columns. When the dataframe is sorted it will keep the first row but drop the second row if the "cols" match, even if there are more columns with non-matching information.

cols = ["col1","col2","col3"]
df = df.loc[(df[cols].shift() != df[cols]).any(axis=1)]

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