12

I need to create a method of class that delete the instance.

public class Car
{
    private string m_Color;

    public string Color
    {
        get { return m_Color; }
        set { m_Color = value; }
    }

    public Car()
    {
    }

    public void Delete()
    {
        /*This method will delete the instance,
        so any references to this instance will be now null*/
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        Car car = new Car();

        car.Delete();

        if(car==null)
            Console.WriteLine("It works.");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("It doesn't work.")
    }
}

I want to know if there is any possible solution (even if it is not recommended) how to do this.

Instance of this class will be stored in hundreds of different class. I will try to describe this, for example there will be these classes:

public class CarKey
{
    private Car m_Car;

    public Car Car
    {
        get { return m_Car; }
    }

    public bool CarExist{ get{ return m_Car != null; } }

    public CarKey( Car car )
    {
        m_Car = car;
    }
}

public class Garages
{
     private List<Car> m_Collection = new List<Car>();

     private int m_Size;

     public int Size{ get{ return m_Size; } }

     public Garages( int size )
     {
         for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
             m_Collection.Add(null);
     }

     public bool IsEmpty( int garage )
     {
         return m_Collection[garage] == null;
     }

     public void InsertCar( Car car, int garage )
     {
          if( m_Collection[garage] != null )
            throw new Exception("This garage is full.");

          m_Collection[garage] = car;
     }


     public Car GetCar( int garage )
     {
         if( m_Collection[garage] == null )
           throw new Exception("There is no car, maybe it was deleted.");

         return m_Collection[garage];
     }
}
10
  • Instead of car.Delete() why not simply car = null?
    – Rohit Vats
    Oct 20 '13 at 11:19
  • 3
    /*This method will delete the instance, so any references to this instance will be now null*/ so any answers about null asigment are incorrect.
    – FLCL
    Oct 20 '13 at 11:24
  • 11
    Why do you need to do this? The garbage collector in .NET will remove your objects from memory when there are no more references to them. What are you actually trying to accomplish that the garbage collector doesn't do for you? It sounds like the actual problem you're facing is somewhere else in the design. Metaphorically speaking, you're asking how to perform Step 5 but you took a wrong turn back at Step 2.
    – David
    Oct 20 '13 at 11:25
  • If you need to force garbage collector then you can GC.Collet() Oct 20 '13 at 11:30
  • 16
    Dear StackOverflow: Instead of coming up with with more creative ways to delete an instance, why don't you try and help OP to solve his actual problem? He doesn't need help deciding between an Old Shoe and a Glass Bottle. Oct 20 '13 at 11:51
20

From any class you can't set its value to null. This is not allowed and doesn't make sense also -

public void Delete()
{
    this = null; <-- NOT ALLOWED
}

You need an instance of class to call Delete() method so why not set that instance to null itself once you are done with it.

Car car = new Car();
// Use car objects and once done set back to null
car = null;

Anyhow what you are trying to achieve is not possible in C#. I suspect from your question that you want this because there are memory leaks present in your current design which doesn't let the Car instance to go away. I would suggest you better profile your application and identify the areas which is stopping GC to collect car instance and work on improving that area.

3
  • 1
    With this command, you set the car reference to null, if there is other references to the same object they will still point to the same object.
    – jannagy02
    Nov 24 '14 at 9:41
  • @jannagy02 - That's what I mentioned in answer that it's not feasible to do that way.
    – Rohit Vats
    Nov 24 '14 at 13:21
  • this = null; is not allowed but one can use Parent.Controls.Remove(this) if the object is the child of anything (which it most likely is).
    – LongToeBoy
    Jul 21 at 21:34
11

I would suggest , to use .Net's IDisposable interface if your are thinking of to release instance after its usage.

See a sample implementation below.

public class Car : IDisposable
{

   public void Dispose()
   {  
      Dispose(true);
       // any other managed resource cleanups you can do here
       Gc.SuppressFinalize(this);
   }
   ~Car()      // finalizer
   {
        Dispose(false);
   }

   protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
   {
     if (!_disposed)
     {
      if (disposing)
      {
        if (_stream != null) _stream.Dispose(); // say you have to dispose a stream
      }

      _stream = null;
    _disposed = true;
    }

   }
}

Now in your code:

void main()
{
   using(var car = new Car())
   {
     // do something with car
   } // here dispose will automtically get called. 
}
2
  • 1
    Why are you calling SupressFinalize in this instance? There is nothing to finalize.. even if the OP had defined a Finalizer. Oct 20 '13 at 11:34
  • @SimonWhitehead thanks for pointing out. My bad , i was bit lazy explaining the stuffs. Now updated the entire implementation..
    – user240141
    Oct 20 '13 at 11:51
5

It sounds like you need to create a wrapper around an instance you can invalidate:

public class Ref<T> where T : class
{
    private T instance;
    public Ref(T instance)
    {
        this.instance = instance;
    }

    public static implicit operator Ref<T>(T inner)
    {
        return new Ref<T>(inner);
    }

    public void Delete()
    {
        this.instance = null;
    }

    public T Instance
    {
        get { return this.instance; }
    }
}

and you can use it like:

Ref<Car> carRef = new Car();
carRef.Delete();
var car = carRef.Instance;     //car is null

Be aware however that if any code saves the inner value in a variable, this will not be invalidated by calling Delete.

2

What you're asking is not possible. There is no mechanism in .Net that would set all references to some object to null.

And I think that the fact that you're trying to do this indicates some sort of design problem. You should probably think about the underlying problem and solve it in another way (the other answers here suggest some options).

1

You can proxyfy references to your object with, for example, dictionary singleton. You may store not object, but its ID or hash and access it trought the dictionary. Then when you need to remove the object you set value for its key to null.

1

You cannot delete an managed object in C# . That's why is called MANAGED language. So you don't have to troble yourself with delete (just like in c++).

It is true that you can set it's instance to null. But that is not going to help you that much because you have no control of your GC (Garbage collector) to delete some objects apart from Collect. And this is not what you want because this will delete all your collection from a generation.

So how is it done then ? So : GC searches periodically objects that are not used anymore and it deletes the object with an internal mechanism that should not concern you.

When you set an instance to null you just notify that your object has no referene anymore ant that could help CG to collect it faster !!!
4
  • GC.Collect collects all generations.. not just "a generation". Oct 20 '13 at 11:37
  • @Simon Whitehead my pardons . Yes indeed! Oct 20 '13 at 11:41
  • @user1576055 This is why is called a safe language. I think my answer was correct. If you want to debate it is so : In c++ we can often meet some circumstances in which an object has it's instance removed , or moved, and such cases may lead to memory leaks. That's why a managed language is told to be safe. You can surrely deactivate the safe directive and play around with unsafe blocks inside a c# language. That will defeat in a certain meassure the purposse of a managed language. Give it a try with unsafe if that satisfy better your needs . Oct 20 '13 at 12:35
  • Do you know how to delete instance with unsafe code ? According to the MSDN documentation only structs and some basic types (for example int, long, double, etc.) can be accessed by pointer. But i need to access instance of my Car class and delete it. Oct 20 '13 at 12:58
0

Use a collection that is a static property of your Car class. Every time you create a new instance of a Car, store the reference in this collection.

To destroy all Cars, just set all items to null.

4
  • 1
    This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. Jul 16 '15 at 4:37
  • @Jonesopolis I think this IS the answer why do you disagree? Jul 16 '15 at 15:12
  • @Knelis I am new and didn't know you could put words in my mouth, I am upset ! Also I think it has to be reference of the reference. Because you don't want to null your collection, but all user created instances. Jul 16 '15 at 16:04
  • 1
    If anything else also had a reference to the items in that collection, then the object would not be garbage collected. Jan 3 '18 at 20:00
0

FLCL's idea is very correct, I show you in a code:

    public class O1<T> where T: class
    {
        public Guid Id { get; }
        public O1(Guid id)
        {
            Id = id;
        }
        public bool IsNull => !GlobalHolder.Holder.ContainsKey(Id);
        public T Val => GlobalHolder.Holder.ContainsKey(Id) ? (T)GlobalHolder.Holder[Id] : null;
    }
    public class GlobalHolder
    {
        public static readonly Dictionary<Guid, object> Holder = new Dictionary<Guid, object>();
        public static O1<T> Instantiate<T>() where T: class, new()
        {
            var a = new T();
            var nguid = Guid.NewGuid();
            var b = new O1<T>(nguid);
            Holder[nguid] = a;
            return b;
        }
        public static void Destroy<T>(O1<T> obj) where T: class
        {
            Holder.Remove(obj.Id);
        }
    }

    public class Animal
    {

    }

    public class AnimalTest
    {
        public static void Test()
        {
            var tom = GlobalHolder.Instantiate<Animal>();
            var duplicateTomReference = tom;
            GlobalHolder.Destroy(tom);
            Console.WriteLine($"{duplicateTomReference.IsNull}");
            // prints true
        }
    }

Note: In this code sample, my naming convention comes from Unity.

-1

You can use extension methods to achive this.

public static ObjRemoverExtension {
    public static void DeleteObj<T>(this T obj) where T: new()
    {
        obj = null;
    }
}

And then you just import it in a desired source file and use on any object. GC will collect it. Like this:Car.DeleteObj()

EDIT Sorry didn't notice the method of class/all references part, but i'll leave it anyway.

2
  • The OP isn't looking for a fancy way to call myCar = null, but for a way to force all held instances across the system to be invalidated. Oct 20 '13 at 11:50
  • Again, "Delete" is not the right term for this. You're setting a reference to null.. not deleting an object. It is still in memory until the garbage collector decides to remove it. That is when it is deleted. Oct 20 '13 at 11:52

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