4
#include <stdio.h>

void main ()
{

  int a = 0, b = 0, c = 0, n;
  int counter = 0;

  printf("Please Enter a Positive Integer: \n");
  scanf("%d", &n);

  for (c = 0; c < n; c++)
  {
      for (b = 0; b < c; b++)
      {
          for (a = 0; a < b; a++)
          {
              if (a * a + b * b == c * c )
              {
                printf("%d: \t%d %d %d\n", ++counter, a, b, c);
              }
          }
      }
  }

}

This program calculates how many Pythagorean triples there are in a given integer n.

This also included all triples that are congruent.

I want to change the program so that it does not include the triples that are a combination of each other, I am lost as to how I would do this, any tips?

For example when the integer 15 is inputted what will be printed is the following:

3, 4, 5

6, 8, 10

5, 12, 13

6, 8, 10 is a combination of 3, 4, 5 and I don't want this value to be printed. How would i change the program so that it does not print any combination of another Pythagorean triple?

  • 3
    And main() should return int. int main(void) or int main (int, char**) Hint: GCD – wildplasser Oct 20 '13 at 17:05
  • I was thinking that lets say that n is any number and that if nana+ nbnb==ncnc and that is equal to aa+bb==cc then the triple would be a combination of one another, i am just not sure how to translate this into code. – Ptrickono Oct 20 '13 at 17:05
  • You could try all numbers n in a certain range and see if any one of them yields a duplicate triple. – n.m. Oct 20 '13 at 17:11
  • 1
    Given the three numbers a, b, c, when the GCD(a,b) ≠ 1 ∧ GCD(b,c) ≠ 1 ∧ GCD(c,a) ≠ 1 (and it might be that the three GCD values have to be the same value), then you have a non-minimal solution. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 20 '13 at 17:15
  • 2
    For reference - GCD: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greatest_common_divisor – alk Oct 20 '13 at 17:41
6

While you could just go through all of the triples and just only keep one if it is not congruent to one of the previous triples (i.e. if the side lengths don't share a common factor), it might be easier if you changed the program so that it only found triples for which the three side lengths do not share a common factor. That way, a triple like 3, 4, 5 would be found, but it would "skip" 6, 8, 10 entirely.

WARNING: What I'm suggesting is a pretty big overhaul. If you only want "small" changes, then this probably isn't what you're looking for.


First, a little bit of background. A Pythagorean triple for which the side lengths are coprime is called a primitive Pythagorean triple. Euclid's theorem states that if m and n are coprime integers and m-n is odd, then

m2 - n2, 2mn, m2 + n2

are the side lengths of a primitive Pythagorean triple. Moreover, all primitive Pythagorean triples are of this form.


So, one thing you could do is restructure your program so that it loops through all of the possible m and n within that range, and then does the printing and incrementing the counter. Something like this:

for all m within range
    for all n greater than m (but still within range)
        if gcd(m,n) = 1
            print out m*m - n*n, 2*m*n, and m*m + n*n
            increment the counter

where within range means that m*m + n*n is still less than whatever limit you read in as input. The for loops would also have to be structured so that "m-n odd" is always true, but that doesn't take much.

  • In order for to do this i would have to completely change my program is what you are saying? As i can understand how this would work looking at the code you provided but i dont really know how i can use this information to change my code to include this. any suggestions? – Ptrickono Oct 20 '13 at 17:19
  • 1
    Yes, it would include a rewrite. The pseudocode I gave is supposed to replace the triple nested for loop that you already have in your code. The idea is here is that you don't have to loop through every combination of 0 <= a <= b < c <= n to get all of the triples; you can invoke some theory to make a smaller loop that doesn't need as many gcd checks. – Dennis Meng Oct 20 '13 at 19:23
  • +1, however the range is going to be off in your pseudo code. If I understand the initial problem correctly, then all three of m^2-n^2, 2mn and n^2 + m^2need to be within the given range, not m and n. – Aleks G Oct 20 '13 at 19:26
  • @AleksG That's why I have the footnote that "within range" means that m*m + n*n is less than the limit, not just m and n. Do you want me to rewrite that bit to be more clear? – Dennis Meng Oct 20 '13 at 19:28
  • Sorry, I must have missed that one line. Works for me. – Aleks G Oct 20 '13 at 19:30
0

Below modification to your code should fix it:

#include <stdio.h>

void main ()
{

int a = 0, b = 0, c = 0, n,i,flag;
int counter = 0;

printf("Please Enter a Positive Integer: \n");
scanf("%d", &n);

for (c = 0; c < n; c++)
{
  for (b = 0; b < c; b++)
  {
      for (a = 0; a < b; a++)
      {
          if (a * a + b * b == c * c )
          {
            flag=0;


                    for(i=2; i < c ; i++)
                    {
                            if(a%i==0 && b%i==0 && c%i==0)
                            {
                            flag = 1;
                            break;
                            }
                    }
                    if(flag)
                    continue;
                    printf("%d: \t%d %d %d\n", ++counter, a, b, c);

          }
      }
  }
 }

}

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