12

In EF5, I relied on the fact that I could recreate my database from the model using Database.CreateIfNotExists()

I would generate Migrations as needed, but never check them in to source control (since they tended to be artifacts of the development cycle) Each developer would then delete and recreate their own databases, from the model as needed.

Then, we would generate migrations by comparing branches of our code, and get the SQL, to apply to production or other shared databases.

This workflow no longer seems to work, as there is no way to generate a database from scratch when migrations are enabled, without first generating all the migrations and then calling update-database. Since calling add-migration modifies the csproj file, this makes my scripts (which allow us to easily switch branches) unusable.

Migrations is enabled for context 'ApplicationDbContext' but the database does not exist or contains no mapped tables. Use Migrations to create the database and its tables, for example by running the 'Update-Database' command from the Package Manager Console.

Is there any way to revert to EF5 behavior where Database.Create will create the current version of the db?

1
  • 2
    It appears that there is not an obvious answer to this as of now. I have added it as an issue on CodePlex Please vote for it over there if you would like to see it fixed. – Doug Jan 28 '14 at 19:27
12

I was using CreateDatabaseIfNotExists to initialize the DB and was able to use update-database and run my application and it would create the DB if it didn't already exist. This seems to have broken with EF 6.0.x.

This was useful, but not what I used.

What I did was abandon my existing initialize code and replaced it with the following code in Global.asax.

Database.SetInitializer(new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<MyContext, Configuration>());
        using (MyContext temp = new MyContext())
        {
            temp.Database.Initialize(true);
        }

Note: MyContext is the context I use and Configuration is the Configuration file that is created when migrations are enabled.

I have seen a lot of posts where people are having problems about this, but not many that describe a solution. I'm not sure why so many people, including myself, have missed this breaking change... (If there's a description about this somewhere, I never saw it until it was too late.)

Edit:

This is code that I added to my context class. I don't like it as much as how it used to work, but it gets the job done for now. See @Doug's comment to the OP about voting on CodePlex.

private static readonly Object syncObj = new Object();
public static bool InitializeDatabase()
{
    lock (syncObj)
    {
        using (var temp = new TbdContext())
        {
            ObjectContext oc = null;
            try
            {
                oc = temp.ObjectContext;
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                //Ignore error
                Console.WriteLine(ex);
            }

            if (oc != null && oc.DatabaseExists())
            {
                return true;
            }
            Database.SetInitializer(new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<TbdContext, Configuration>());
            try
            {
                temp.Database.Initialize(true);
                return true;
            }
            catch (DataException ex)
            {

        }
    }
}

Then in my Global.asax.cs Application_Start() I do this:

if (databaseInitialized == false)
    databaseInitialized = MyContext.InitializeDatabase();

Edit:

I upgraded to EF 6.1 and found this doesn't work anymore.(https://stackoverflow.com/a/22770517/2033294) Here's what I did to fix it:

    private static readonly Object syncObj = new Object();
    public static bool InitializeDatabase()
    {
        lock (syncObj)
        {
            using (var temp = new MyContext())
            {
                if (temp.Database.Exists()) return true;

                var initializer = new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<MyContext, Configuration>();
                Database.SetInitializer(initializer);
                try
                {
                    temp.Database.Initialize(true);
                    return true;
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    //Handle Error in some way
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
    }
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  • 1
    The problem with this is that it will migrate your database from a previous version to a new version... it isn't a complete match for CreateDatabaseIfNotExists which creates the latest version of your DB only when a DB with the same name doesn't exist. I want more granular control over migrations when I have actual data in the database – dannykay1710 Nov 25 '13 at 10:52
  • @dannykay1710, I'm not sure I follow you, but I'd like to. Two questions. First, what do you mean it will migrate to a new version? This will run the database migrations are you saying that CreateDatabaseIfNotExists would only run the migrations if the DB didn't exist? Second, what is an example of granular control you would want/need? – Jeff Nov 25 '13 at 18:05
  • I don't like the idea that an app that I have compiled will automatically make schema changes to my live database automatically with no warning, just because the new version has a new migration. I only want the schema to automatically be created if the configured DB doesn't exist - not whenever there is a new migration. Schema changes can quite easily cause data loss. Whilst you can ask EF not to make changes if data loss would occur I would still, in most cases, like the control to test and control this change. – dannykay1710 Nov 26 '13 at 16:11
  • @dannykay1710, correct me if I'm wrong... If you if you make a change the requires a new migration, you won't be able to test the new code until you run the migration right? (I don't remember the exact wording but EF will throw an exception that the model and the DB don't match). So at some point after testing, you need to enable the migration or up date the database manually right? For data loss did you have the same problems with older versions of EF? Based on these comments I'm going to look into making my solution more robust. – Jeff Nov 28 '13 at 0:10
  • 2
    @Jeff - the idea was that I used to literally drop the database, and recreate it using the process described above (which used to work) With your method, I must create the migration (as you say), then run the code you describe (which does indeed work) The difference is that I didn't have to generate migrations for a clean database in EF5. In EF6, I have to create migrations, update my db, and then delete them. I would have preferred to only create migrations when I needed to for a production migration (not in my daily dev workflow) – Doug Jan 28 '14 at 4:35
2

This works for me (so far...):

var connectionString = "Data Source=localhost;Initial Catalog=Chilli;" + 
    "Integrated Security=True;" + 
    "MultipleActiveResultSets=True;Application Name=ChilliDesktop";

//ooops... you have to create a new, blank database if one does not exist
var bld = new SqlConnectionStringBuilder(connectionString);
var dbName = bld.InitialCatalog; //i.e. Chilli

bld.InitialCatalog = "master";

//a connectionstring pointing at Master
var masterConnectionString = bld.ConnectionString; 

using (var cnn = new SqlConnection(masterConnectionString))
{
  var cmdString = string.Format(
     "if not exists (select * from sys.databases where name='{0}')" + 
     "\r\ncreate database {0}",
     dbName);
   using (var cmd = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand(cmdString,cnn))
   {
     cmd.Connection.Open();
     cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
   }                
 }


var connectionInfo = 
    new System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure
        .DbConnectionInfo(connectionString, "System.Data.SqlClient");
//new up your auto-created Migrations Configuration class
var config = new Chilli.Context.Migrations.Configuration();
config.TargetDatabase = connectionInfo;
//new up a Migrator
var migrator = new System.Data.Entity.Migrations
    .DbMigrator(config);
migrator.Update();
//you now have a database

//run your Seed method
using (var dc = new Chilli.Context.Context(connectionString))
{
    Chilli.Context.ChilliContextInitializerHelper.Seed(dc);
}

http://softwaremechanik.wordpress.com/2013/11/04/ef6-if-migrations-are-enabled-cannot-createdatabaseifnotexists/

2
  • Just realised, you have to create a new, blank database before calling Update() – ajd Nov 24 '13 at 19:15
  • Hi @dannykay1710: For granular control of migrations, get a list of Pending Migrations then apply just some of them… var migrator = new System.Data.Entity.Migrations .DbMigrator(config); var pendingMigrations = migrator.GetPendingMigrations(); – ajd Nov 26 '13 at 1:04
2

Here is the answer...

EF Team Triage: This is 'By Design' and was an intentional change we took in EF6. If this initializer is used to create the database then a single entry is added to the __MigrationsHistory table which then renders the database un-usable with migrations (since these initializers don't use your migrations to create the database). This has confused a large number of people in previous releases, so we opted to not automatically create database/schema when migrations is enabled.

You can use the MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion initializer if you just want your migrations to be applied. If you want to drop the database then you could easily wrap this in a custom initializer that includes a call to context.Database.Delete().

http://entityframework.codeplex.com/workitem/1689

1
  • Thank you for the clarification – mac10688 Feb 19 '14 at 4:29
2

To others stuck. I ended up doing this in EF6.

public CatContext(bool forcePreparation)
{
    if (!forcePreparation)
        return;

    if (!Database.Exists() || !Database.CompatibleWithModel(false))
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<CatContext>(new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion<CatContext, Configuration>());
    }
    else
    {
        // Database exists and matches the current model.
        // Doing this special thing to avoid the bug that arises sometimes.
        Database.SetInitializer<CatContext>(null);
    }

    Database.Initialize(true);
}

public CatContext()
    : this(forcePreparation: false)
{ }

In my code I create the context object as new CatContext(true).

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