20

Let's say I have an object that represents a field of data, that object needs the following properties: Name, Type, Value, Length. Here is the object:

class Field<T>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Type Type
    {
        get
        {
            return typeof(T);
        }
    }
    public int Length { get; set; }
    public T Value { get; set; }
}  

I have used generics, because I want to force the user of the code to only be able to assign a Value of certain Type.
Now the problem is when I want to create a list of fields.
If I create the list like List<Field<object>> then we can assign any Value to a given Field on the list, and when we query for Type, we get 'object'.
The thing is - on that list I might want few fields holding strings, few holding ints, dates, and even custom objects that in turn will have a list of Fields...
Is the Generics a good solution for something like that? If yes, how would I go about implementing it? If not, what is a better way?

---EDIT---
Just to add some more background:
1. I might want a list of fields, and each field will hold different data type, like so :

List<Field<object>> lst = new List<Field<object>>();
lst.Add(new Field<string>());
lst.Add(new Field<int>());
lst.Add(new Field<SomeObjectFromMyApp>());

2. Later on I will have to query these objects, and their attributes automaticaly in a loop, something like that:

foreach(Field<object> fld in lst)
{
    Type t = fld.Type;
    //do some other stuff
}
  • What do you want exactly ? I don't understand this sentence : "on that list I might want few fields holding strings, few holding ints, dates, and even custom objects that in turn will have a list of Fields" – Florian Oct 21 '13 at 9:43
  • Exactly what it says, I will have few different lists of Fields, but each Field on that list might be holding different data type (int, string or some custom object). – Daniel Gruszczyk Oct 21 '13 at 9:46
18

Yes, generics is a good choice. The key to achieving type-safety (and being identify the type with the Type property is to add an abstraction between the list and Field<T> class.

Have Field<T> implement the interface IField. This interface doesn't need any members.

Then declare your list as being List<IField>.

That way you constrain the list to only contain fields, but each field can be of a different type.

To then read the values later, just do

foreach(var field in list)
{
    var type = field.Type;
    ....
}
  • 1
    That would solve a problem with creating the list, but it wouldn't solve the problem of reading values back, since now I would have to cast to an appropriate Field<_type_> , and there is no way I know the _type_ at that time... – Daniel Gruszczyk Oct 21 '13 at 9:55
  • 1
    thanks for a good idea. I ended up discovering that I need an extended functionality and therefore went with an abstract class and a factory pattern to create all different types of fields. I am marking your answer as correct since attempt at implementing an interface like you suggested led me to my final, working solution. Thanks. – Daniel Gruszczyk Oct 21 '13 at 10:18
  • 1
    You get a list of IField's, which contain no data. – Wish Jun 8 '16 at 14:50
  • 3
    @Wish, they contain data; that data just isn't accessible without casting. Looking at this answer three years later though, I do not understand why it was upvoted. The var type = field.Type; line is nonsense and wouldn't compile. – David Arno Jun 8 '16 at 15:22
  • 1
    @DavidArno 2 years later, I stumbled upon this question and I noticed that var type = field.Type won't compile, however, there's a simple fix for that. You could simply use dynamic type = field.Type and everything is good to go. So maybe adding this to the answer helps someone. Thank you. – Mehdi Apr 20 '18 at 5:58
13

I suggest you to define an interface and Field<T> implements that interface

public interface IField
{

}

public class Field<T> : IField
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Type Type
    {
        get
        {
            return typeof(T);
        }
    }
    public int Length { get; set; }
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

so you can write this code:

var list = new List<IField>();

now this list can contain any object of type Field<T>

  • 1
    What's the benefit of repeating an existing answer? – David Arno Oct 21 '13 at 10:01
  • 10
    There was only 4 minutes between them. If you're a slow typer like me, you might not have noticed the other answer. – e-on Oct 21 '13 at 10:06
  • 2
    Yes I didn't notice the other answer :) – VahiD Oct 21 '13 at 10:08
2

As a few commenters already mentioned, you cannot access the Type property if you create an empty Interface, so I would rather do:

public interface IField
{
    Type Type { get; }

    string Name { get; set; }

    int Length { get; set; }
}

public class Field<T> : IField
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    Type IField.Type => typeof(T);

    public int Length { get; set; }

    public T Value { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }
}

Then you can check of which datatype the value property is and cast the object to the right type:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var fieldList = new List<IField>()
        {
            new Field<string>()
            {
                Value = "Hello World!", 
                Length = 12, 
                Name = "A string"
            },
            new Field<int>()
            {
                Value = 4711,
                Length = sizeof(int),
                Name = "An integer value"
            },
            new Field<double>()
            {
                Value = 2.4,
                Length = sizeof(double),
                Name = "A double value"
            },
        };

        foreach (var field in fieldList)
        {
            if (field.Type == typeof(string))
            {
                PrintField(field, "String value:");
            }
            else if (field.Type == typeof(int))
            {
                PrintField(field, "Integer value:");
            }
            else if (field.Type == typeof(double))
            {
                PrintField(field, "Double value:");
            }
        }
    }

    static void PrintField(IField field, string info)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine(info);
        Debug.WriteLine($"\tName: {field.Name}, Length: {field.Length}, Value: {field}");
    }
}

The code produces the following output:

// String value:
//  Name: A string, Length: 12, Value: Hello World!
// Integer value:
//     Name: An integer value, Length: 4, Value: 4711
// Double value:
//     Name: A double value, Length: 8, Value: 2,4

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