11

I wonder what's the equivalent of C++'s reinterpret_cast in C#!?

Here's my sample:

class Base
{
    protected int counter = 0;
}

class Foo : Base
{
    public int Counter
    {
        get { return counter; }
    }
}

Base b = new Base();
Foo f = b as Foo; // f will be null

I've got no objection why f will be null since it should be. But if it was C++ I could have written Foo f = reinterpret_cast<Foo>(b); and get what I wanted. What can I do to achieve the same in C#?

PS. I'm assuming that Base and Foo are consistent data-wise.

[UPDATE]

Here's a simple scenario where a reinterpret_cast could be helpful:

Consider writing an XXX-RPC library where you've got no control over the incoming parameters nor the signature of services to call. Your library is supposed to call the asked service with the given parameters. If C# supported reinterpret_cast I could simply reinterpret_cast the given parameters into the expected ones and call the service.

9
  • 1
    @JLott, It can't help. C# is more type-safe than C++. – Hamlet Hakobyan Oct 21 '13 at 15:00
  • @JLott I've read that post but it's completely different from what I'm asking. – Mehran Oct 21 '13 at 15:02
  • 1
    @DmitryLedentsov AFAIK RPC libraries implement this through serialization & deserialization, using string as the intermediate medium. – Mehran Oct 21 '13 at 16:53
  • 1
    One can see the string as a byte sequence, hence by a natural analogy, you reinterpret the string as an object. A c++ - like reinterpret_cast is unsafe by nature, since you can hardly say if it worked correctly. By using serialization (binary, if you need a compact one), you gain fine-grain control of filure, in particular, of partial failure. As other commenters notice, .Net type system is supposed to be safe :) – Dmitry Ledentsov Oct 22 '13 at 7:14
7

discussion

As some of the answers point out, .Net is enforcing type safety rigorously in the question's scope. A reinterpret_cast would be an inherently unsafe operation, hence the possible ways to implement one would be either through reflection or serialization, whereas the two are related.

As you mentioned in an update, a possible use could be an RPC framework. RPC libraries typically use serialization/reflection anyway, and there are a couple of usable ones:

so, you might not want to write one yourself, perhaps.

If your class Base would use public properties, you could use AutoMapper:

class Base
{
    public int Counter { get; set; }
    // ...
}

...

AutoMapper.Mapper.CreateMap<Base, Foo>();
Foo foo = AutoMapper.Mapper.Map<Foo>(b);

Where Foo need not be derived from Base at all. It just has to have the property you are interested in mapping onto. But again, you might not need two types at all - a rethinking of the architecture might be the solution.

Typically, there is no need to use reinterpret_cast, by way of a clean architecture that fits nicely into the patterns used in the .Net Framework. If you still insist on having something like that, here's a solution using the compact serialization library protobuf-net.

serialization solution

Your classes:

using System;
using System.IO;
using ProtoBuf;
using ProtoBuf.Meta;

[ProtoContract]
[ProtoInclude(3, typeof(Foo))]
class Base
{
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    protected int counter = 0;

    public Base(int c) { counter = c; }
    public Base() { }
}

[ProtoContract]
class Foo : Base
{
    public int Counter { get { return counter; } }
}

and a runnable serialization-deserialization example:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Base b = new Base(33);
        using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            Serializer.Serialize<Base>(stream, b);
            Console.WriteLine("Length: {0}", stream.Length);
            stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
            Foo f=new Foo();
            RuntimeTypeModel.Default.Deserialize(stream, f, typeof(Foo));
            Console.WriteLine("Foo: {0}", f.Counter);
        }
    }
}

outputting

Length: 2
Foo: 33

If you don't want to declare derived types in your contract, see this example...

As you see, the serialization is extremely compact.

If you want to use more fields, you might try implicit serialization of fields:

[ProtoContract(ImplicitFields = ImplicitFields.AllFields)]

A generic reinterpret_cast might definitely be possible to implement either via this serialization solution, or directly via reflection, but I wouldn't invest the time at the moment.

3
  • 1
    Perhaps it would be nice if you could include a bit of our conversation in your post. Something like 'since it is not supported in c# here's a substitute...'. Thanks it's great. – Mehran Oct 22 '13 at 12:02
  • One final thought, you can make a generic method out of it, taking in two types converting from first to second. Then it will be much closer to C++'s reinterpret_cast. – Mehran Oct 22 '13 at 12:07
  • oh, forgot. There is AutoMapper as well, but it would map only properties, and not fields, as far as I know, all done using reflection. – Dmitry Ledentsov Oct 22 '13 at 12:55
11

This works. And yes, it's as evil and as awesome as you can possibly imagine.

static unsafe TDest ReinterpretCast<TSource, TDest>(TSource source)
{
    var sourceRef = __makeref(source);
    var dest = default(TDest);
    var destRef = __makeref(dest);
    *(IntPtr*)&destRef = *(IntPtr*)&sourceRef;
    return __refvalue(destRef, TDest);
}

One thing to note is that if you're casting a T[] to and U[]:

  • If T is bigger than U, the bounds-checking will prevent you from accessing the U elements past the original length of the T[]
  • If T is smaller than U, the bounds-checking will let you read past the last element (effectively its a buffer overrun vulnerability)
2
  • Note that GetType still seems to return TSource, so not quite complete. – NetMage Aug 22 '19 at 19:33
  • @NetMage yes the run-time type information is the same; this just circumvents the compile-time and JIT type safety – Nick Strupat Jan 28 '20 at 17:01
3

You might be able to achieve similar behavior with unsafe blocks and void* in C#:

unsafe static TResult ReinterpretCast<TOriginal, TResult>(this TOriginal original)
    where TOriginal : struct
    where TResult : struct
{
    return *(TResult*)(void*)&original;
}

Usage:

Bar b = new Bar();
Foo f = b.ReinterpretCast<Foo>();
f = ReinterpretCast<Foo>(b); // this works as well

Not tested.

The struct constraints nullify the point of your question, I guess, but they're necessary since classes are managed by the GC so you're not allowed to have pointers to them.

0
1

C# doesn't have the hole in the type system which would allow you to do this. It knows what type things are and won't allow you to cast to a different type. The reasons for this are fairly obvious. What happens when you add a field to Foo?

If you want a type of Foo, you need to create a type of Foo. What might be a better route is creating a constructor of type Foo which takes a Base as parameter.

3
  • In case of a data inconsistency I would say it could throw an exception, it could return null or... – Mehran Oct 21 '13 at 15:05
  • It could, but it doesn't – Joel Oct 21 '13 at 17:55
  • 1
    Instead it does that when you cast to the wrong type. Much safer and more stable in my opinion. – Joel Oct 22 '13 at 16:56
1

This is my 'implementation'

[System.Runtime.CompilerServices.MethodImpl(System.Runtime.CompilerServices.MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)]
    public unsafe static TResult ReinterpretCast<TOriginal, TResult>(/*this*/ TOriginal orig)
        //refember ReferenceTypes are references to the CLRHeader
        //where TOriginal : struct
        //where TResult : struct
    {
        return Read<TResult>(AddressOf(orig));
    }

Ensure you know what your doing when you call it, especially with reference types.

1
  • 1
    If you take a peek at my answer; I'm doing the same, but without the requirement of unsafe code. – mg30rg Sep 10 '19 at 11:53
1

If Foo and Bar were structs, you could do

    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.StructLayout(System.Runtime.InteropServices.LayoutKind.Explicit)]
    public class MyFooBarHelper
    {
        [System.Runtime.InteropServices.FieldOffset(0)] public Foo theFoo;
        [System.Runtime.InteropServices.FieldOffset(0)] public Bar theBar;            
    }

but I'm not sure this would work on objects.

0
0

Since b is only an instance of Base you will never be able to cast it to a non null instance of Foo. Perhaps an interface might suit your needs better?

1
  • Thanks for your suggestion but the question stands firm. – Mehran Oct 21 '13 at 14:56

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