7

Suppose I have a record, e.g. Person, and I want to be able to look this person up through multiple data structures. Maybe there's an index by name, another index by the person's zip code, and another index by the person's current latitude and longitude. And maybe many more data structures. All of which exist because I need to efficiently look up a person or persons with different criteria.

If I just need to read a person's attributes, this is no problem. But now suppose I need to look up a person using one of these data structures and then update the person's data.

In an OOP language, each data structure would point to the same person in memory. So when you update one, you're implicitly updating the referents of the other data structures as well. This is pretty much the definition of side effects and impurity. I know it's totally counter to the Haskell paradigm, and I'm not expecting Haskell to work this way.

So, what is the Haskell-ish way to do it? To be clear, the problem is this: I look up a person by one data structure, and I pass that person (and maybe some other arbitrary data) into a function of type ArbitraryData -> Person -> Person. How do I propagate this change across all the various lookup structures?

As a relative newcomer to Haskell, my first instinct is to reconstruct every lookup structure with the newly updated person, every time I update a person. But that seems like a lot of ceremony, with plenty of opportunity for me to screw up in a way GHC can't detect, and not at all elegant. Haskell is known for its elegance, and I can't imagine it lacks an elegant solution to such a common and basic problem. So I think I'm missing something.

For reference, this question expands on some of the issues I was discussing in the following questions:

Multiple lookup structures for same data: Memory duplication?

Identity of simulation objects in Haskell

Edit

One solution that just crossed my mind: Don't maintain a copy of each lookup structure in your main state. Just keep one single list of all persons in existence, and that's the only thing we need to update when we update a person. Every time you need to lookup by, say, zip code, pass the list of all persons into a function that generates the efficient by-zip-code data structure. Then perform the lookup on the result.

I don't know if this would be efficient. If it results in the CPU actually recomputing the lookup structure on each use, it's unacceptable. But I know Haskell sometimes can avoid reevaluating identical expressions. Unfortunately, I still haven't figured out when this is the case. So I don't know if this approach is viable.

So in other words: Can I write my functions as if they're computing the lookup each time, when in fact GHC will optimize it away for cases where the underlying data hasn't changed? Because that would be a very elegant solution to the problem I've identified above.

5

Since I answered this, a few people in #haskell on Freenode recommended alternative, premade solutions:


You can make a data structure that contains your lookup tables, as well as a Vector of actual Persons. The lookup tables will give you an Int or a list of Ints (rather than a Person or a list of Persons) which is the index into the Vector Person. For example:

data PersonStuff = PersonStuff {
                                 persons              :: Vector Person,
                                 firstNameLookupTable :: LookupTable Name,
                                 ...
                               }

data LookupTable a = LookupTable {
                                   table  :: Map a Int,
                                   update :: Person -> Person -> Map a Int -> Map a Int
                                 }

The update function is given the old Person, the updated Person, and will update the table only if the relevant details have changed. When a Person is modified through the convenient PersonStuff functions you'll write, those functions will update all the lookup tables for you, returning a new PersonStuff with all associated data. This makes for a pure data structure with quick lookups.

You can make functions like updatePeopleWithFirstName :: Name -> (Person -> Person) -> PersonStuff -> PersonStuff that will get all the people with a first name, apply a Person -> Person to each of them, modify their entries in the Vector, and use the update functions to update all of the lookupTables.

  • This is a reasonable approach, but unlike Map, updating a Vector is O(n). So if you have a large set and/or frequent updates, you still may need a mutable structure. – John L Oct 22 '13 at 1:10
3

I would probably just update every lookup structure with the new value. Perhaps grouping the structures in a record and providing a global update function.

Or perhaps you could designate one of the search criteria as "primary", and have the values in the other lookup maps point to the "primary key" of the object, instead of to the object value itself. That would cause one additional lookup for each access by non-primary key, though.

  • As seen in this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/19229586/… the overall opinion of the community seemed to be that you shouldn't explicitly manage object identity in Haskell, through primary keys or otherwise. I'm personally on the fence about that. But I'm new to the language, so I'm inclined to cargo-cult the majority viewpoint until such time as I can intelligently disagree. – rlkw1024 Oct 21 '13 at 19:37
  • 1
    @Jarrett Keep in mind that, even in a conventional OO language, you would probably need to update some your lookup structures. What happens if a person changes his name, for example? And if he changes his position, wouldn't you need to update the spatial index? You can't rely on shared values for that. – danidiaz Oct 21 '13 at 19:45
  • Yes, you would definitely update the lookup structures in OOP from time to time. But you don't have to update every single one every time. And an update function only needs to "know" about the data structures it invalidates. This promotes loose coupling. – rlkw1024 Oct 21 '13 at 19:50
  • 2
    A generic update function knowing which data structures it invalidates is tight coupling, since tight coupling has to do with necessary knowledge of internals, and so an ignorant one that just updates every lookup table is very loosely coupled. There is no house of cards effect for that. Each lookup table can provide an update function that figures out whether relevant information was changed. This will be very loosely-coupled, since internal knowledge of the lookup tables is 'provided by' the lookup tables that have those internals rather than encoded within a generic update function. – Olathe Oct 21 '13 at 22:14
  • 1
    You can also avoid the need for some updates by using a Vector Person to store the Person objects and having the lookup tables return Int indexes into that Vector rather than Person objects. Then, if a Person changes, the value in the Vector and the keys in only some of the lookup tables need to change. You can provide nice functions that hide all of that complexity, so that you can, say, use Person -> Person functions to change whatever you want about a Person. – Olathe Oct 21 '13 at 22:26
3

We have two challenges. The first is "How do [we] propagate [a] change across ... various lookup structures". The second is to minimize the work done when we perform lookups.

Let's make some working code so that we have something concrete to discuss.

To begin with, let's look at what an "update" or "change" is. An update or change starts in one state, and ends up in another state. It's a function from the previous state to the next state. It basically is type Update = State -> State. In Haskell, we can make the state disappear by hiding it in some Monad; this is a very common practice, so despite the fact it looks "impure" it is very "Haskell-ish". You can read more about this idea by reading about the state monad.

Here's a class similar to MonadState that lets us talk about values we can allocate (new), update (set), and inspect (get).

-- Class for a typed dictionary in a monadic context
class (Monad m) => MonadReference m where
    type Reference :: * -> *
    new :: (Typeable a) => a -> m (Reference a)
    set :: (Typeable a) => (Reference a) -> a -> m ()
    get :: (Typeable a) => (Reference a) -> m a

We'll use this to write some very simple example code.

data Person = Person {
    name :: String
} deriving (Show, Typeable)

data Company = Company {
    legalName :: String
} deriving (Show, Typeable)

-- the only thing we need MonadIO for in this exmple is printing output
example1 :: (MonadIO m, MonadReference m) => m ()
example1 = do
    -- alice :: Reference Person
    alice <- new $ Person { name = "Alice" }
    bob <- new $ Person { name = "Bob" }
    -- company :: Reference Company
    company <- new $ Company { legalName = "Eve's Surveillance" }
    (liftIO . print) =<< get alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< get bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< get company
    (liftIO . putStrLn) ""
    set alice Person { name = "Mike" }
    set company Company { legalName = "Mike's Meddling" }
    (liftIO . print) =<< get alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< get bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< get company

We've used new, get, and set to create some References, inspect them, and modify them.

To get this to work, we need a bit of boring boilerplate. We'll borrow IORef for our implementation of a Reference to run this code without writing too much code ourselves.

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, DeriveDataTypeable #-}
module Main (
    main
) where

import Data.Typeable
import Data.Traversable
import Control.Applicative
import Data.IORef

--transformers package:
import Control.Monad.IO.Class

main = example1

-- Instead of implementing a dictionary, for an example we'll just use IORefs when we have IO.
instance MonadReference IO where
    type Reference = IORef
    new = newIORef
    set = writeIORef
    get = readIORef

Now, on top of updating people, we'd also like to update the people in a multiple data structures. We'll look at two data structures: a list, [Person], and a tuple, (Person,Company). Now, we could make a list of References to people, say (people :: [Reference Person]) = [alice, bob], but this isn't very useful. For example, we don't really know how to show it. It would be more useful if Reference weren't intermingled inside the list. Naively, Reference [Person] would be more useful. But it would mean nothing to set this Reference, so clearly we have the wrong type. Reference [Person] would just let us call get to turn it into an m [Person], so we could skip that and just use m [Person]. Here's an example that does that:

-- the only thing we need MonadIO for in this exmple is printing output
example2 :: (MonadIO m, MonadReference m) => m ()
example2 = do
    -- alice :: Reference Person
    alice <- new $ Person { name = "Alice" }
    bob <- new $ Person { name = "Bob" }
    -- company :: Reference Company
    company <- new $ Company { legalName = "Eve's Surveillance" }
    (liftIO . print) =<< get alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< get bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< get company
    let people = do
        a <- get alice
        b <- get bob
        return [a, b]
    let structure2 = do
        a <- get alice
        c <- get company
        return (a, c)
    (liftIO . print) =<< people
    (liftIO . print) =<< structure2
    (liftIO . putStrLn) ""
    set alice Person { name = "Mike" }
    set company Company { legalName = "Mike's Meddling" }
    (liftIO . print) =<< get alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< get bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< get company
    (liftIO . print) =<< people
    (liftIO . print) =<< structure2

Now we know quite a bit about what a library or libraries for doing this should look like. Here are some of the requirements we might have already imagined:

  • We need something that keeps the state of all of the entities
  • We need a way to go from one state to a new state that has a new entity
  • We need a way to update an entity stored in the state
  • We need a way to retrieve an entity from the state

Here are some requirements that emerge from experimenting with some code:

  • We need a way to make a state dependent value that depends on the current state of an entity. We saw this in get alice, get bob, and get company.
  • We need a way to make a state dependent value out of something constant. We saw this in the use of the (:), [], and (,) constructors.
  • We need a way to combine together multiple state dependent values into new state dependent values.

There's are also a few problems with our example. If we embrace MonadReference m => m a as the type of a state dependent value of type a, there's nothing to stop something that we think is getting the value from the state from also modifying it.

  • A state dependent value shouldn't be able to modify the state.

We also have performance problems. All of our state dependent values are being completely recalculated every time we use them. A good performance requirement might be:

  • A state dependent value shouldn't be calculated unless state that it depends on has been modified.

Armed with these new requirements, we can make new interfaces. After we make new interfaces, we can equip them with a naive implementation. After we have a naive implementation, we can address our requirements for performance, and make a performant implementation.

Some exercise that could prepare us for the next steps include reading about or playing with Control.Applicative, the publisher-subscriber design pattern, the operational monad and transformer Program and ProgramT or the free monad and transformer Free, FreeF, and FreeT, Data.Traversable, Control.Lens, and the knockout.js javascript library.

Update: The new interfaces

Based on our new requirements for what state dependent values are, we can write a new interface:

-- Class for a monad with state dependent values
class (MonadReference m, Applicative Computed, Monad Computed) => MonadComputed m where
    type Computed :: * -> *
    track :: (Typeable a) => Reference a -> m (Computed a)
    runComputed :: (Typeable a) => (Computed a) -> m a

These address our new requirements as follows:

  • track makes a state dependent value that depends on a Reference, which satisfies our first new requirement.
  • Applicative's pure and Monad's return both provide a method by which to create new Computed values that contain a constant.
  • Applicative's <*> and Monad's >>= provide methods by which to combine computed values into new computed values.
  • The Computed type provides a means for an implementation to exclude unwanted types.

Now we can write new example code in terms of this interface. We'll construct computed values three different ways: Using Data.Traversable's sequenceA on lists with the Applicative instance for Computed, using the Monad instance for Computed, and finally using the Applicative instance for Computed.

-- the only thing we need MonadIO for in this exmple is printing output
example :: (MonadIO m, MonadComputed m) => m ()
example = do
    -- aliceRef :: Reference Person
    aliceRef <- new $ Person { name = "Alice" }
    -- alice :: Computed Person
    alice <- track aliceRef
    bobRef <- new $ Person { name = "Bob" }
    bob <- track bobRef
    -- companyRef :: Reference Company
    companyRef <- new $ Company { legalName = "Eve's Surveillance" }
    -- company :: Computed Company
    company <- track companyRef
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed company
    let people = Traversable.sequenceA [alice, bob]
    let structure2 = do
        a <- alice
        c <- company
        return (a, c)
    let structure3 = (pure (,)) <*> structure2 <*> bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed people
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure2
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure3
    (liftIO . putStrLn) ""
    set aliceRef Person { name = "Mike" }
    set companyRef Company { legalName = "Mike's Meddling" }
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed company
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed people
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure2
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure3

Note that if we didn't want or need to track aliceRef and track bobRef independently, we could create a list of Computed values by mapM track [aliceRef, bobRef].

Now we can make another simple implementation for IO, so that we can run our example and see that we are on the right track. We'll use operational's Program type to make this simple and get us both an Applicative and a Monad instance.

-- Evaluate computations built in IO
instance MonadComputed IO where
    -- Store the syntax tree in a Program from operational
    type Computed = Program IORef
    track = return . singleton
    runComputed c = case view c of 
        Return x -> return x
        ref :>>= k -> do
            value <- readIORef ref
            runComputed (k value)

At this point the entire running example is:

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies, DeriveDataTypeable, FlexibleContexts #-}
module Main (
    main
) where

import Data.Typeable
import qualified Data.Traversable as Traversable
import Control.Applicative
import Data.IORef

--transformers package:
import Control.Monad.IO.Class

--operational package:
import Control.Monad.Operational

main = example

data Person = Person {
    name :: String
} deriving (Show, Typeable)

data Company = Company {
    legalName :: String
} deriving (Show, Typeable)

-- the only thing we need MonadIO for in this exmple is printing output
example :: (MonadIO m, MonadComputed m) => m ()
example = do
    -- aliceRef :: Reference Person
    aliceRef <- new $ Person { name = "Alice" }
    -- alice :: Computed Person
    alice <- track aliceRef
    bobRef <- new $ Person { name = "Bob" }
    bob <- track bobRef
    -- companyRef :: Reference Company
    companyRef <- new $ Company { legalName = "Eve's Surveillance" }
    -- company :: Computed Company
    company <- track companyRef
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed company
    let people = Traversable.sequenceA [alice, bob]
    let structure2 = do
        a <- alice
        c <- company
        return (a, c)
    let structure3 = (pure (,)) <*> structure2 <*> bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed people
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure2
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure3
    (liftIO . putStrLn) ""
    set aliceRef Person { name = "Mike" }
    set companyRef Company { legalName = "Mike's Meddling" }
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed alice
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed bob
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed company
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed people
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure2
    (liftIO . print) =<< runComputed structure3


-- Class for a typed dictionary in a monadic context
class (Monad m) => MonadReference m where
    type Reference :: * -> *
    new :: (Typeable a) => a -> m (Reference a)
    set :: (Typeable a) => Reference a -> a -> m ()
    get :: (Typeable a) => Reference a -> m a


-- Class for a monad with state dependent values
class (MonadReference m, Applicative Computed, Monad Computed) => MonadComputed m where
    type Computed :: * -> *
    track :: (Typeable a) => Reference a -> m (Computed a)
    runComputed :: (Typeable a) => (Computed a) -> m a

-- Instead of implementing a dictionary, for an example we'll just use IORefs when we have IO.
instance MonadReference IO where
    type Reference = IORef
    new = newIORef
    set = writeIORef
    get = readIORef    

-- Evaluate computations built in IO
instance MonadComputed IO where
    -- Store the syntax tree in a Program from operational
    type Computed = Program IORef
    track = return . singleton
    runComputed c = case view c of 
        Return x -> return x
        ref :>>= k -> do
            value <- readIORef ref
            runComputed (k value)

We still need to address our performance requirement to minimize the work done when we perform lookups. Our goal requirement was:

  • A state dependent value shouldn't be calculated unless state that it depends on has been modified.

We can now clarify this to be in terms of our interface:

  • runComputed shouldn't be calculated unless a Computed value that it depends on has been modified since the last time runComputed was executed.

We can now see that our desired solution is going to be something like cache invalidation or bottom-up query evaluation. I'd guess that in a language with lazy evaluation, they both work out to be about the same thing.

Final Update: Performance

Equipped with a new interface, we can now explore and address our performance goal. In doing so, I discovered that there's an additional, subtle requirement that we missed. We would like runComputed to reuse previously computed values if the value hasn't been changed. What we didn't notice is that Haskell's type system should and is preventing us from doing so. A value of type Computed a always means the same thing, it's never actually modified. So the computations that were building our structures will mean the same thing, "a computation constructed from these parts" even after we have executed runComputed. We need to slip in somewhere to put the side effect from the first runComputed. We can do this with the type m (Computed a) instead. The new method in MonadComputed m that does this is:

share :: (Typeable a) => (Computed a) -> m (Computed a)

The new Computed a we get back means something slightly different: "a possibly cached computation constructed from these parts". We were already doing something similar, but telling Haskell about it instead of telling our code. We wrote, for example:

    let people = Traversable.sequenceA [alice, bob]

This let told the Haskell compiler that each time it encountered people it should use the same thunk. If we instead wrote Traversable.sequenceA [alice, bob] each time it would be used, the Haskell compiler probably wouldn't have created and maintained a pointer to a single thunk. This can be a nice thing to know when juggling memory. If you want to maintain something in memory and avoid computation, use let, if you want to recompute it to avoid holding onto the memory, don't use let. Here we explicitly want to hold on to our computed structures, so we are going to use our new equivalent, share

    people <- share $ Traversable.sequenceA [alice, bob]

The remainder of the changes to the example code at the end are to demonstrate more possible updates.

Now that we have the interface finalized, we can work on an implementation. This implementation will still take advantage of IO and IORefs. Our implementation is going to be based on subscribing to be notified of changes, and invalidating cached changes and their dependants when a change happens. This data structure stores a value and the subscribers that want to be notified:

-- A published value for IO, using Weak references to the subscribers
data Published a = Published {
    valueRef :: IORef a,
    subscribers :: IORef [Weak (IO ())]
}

Something that needs to be notified when something happens in IO could be as simple as IO (), but then the cycle between a dependant computation and a value would hold all the dependant computations in memory until the original value is forgotten. Instead a Weak pointer (from System.Mem.Weak) to the dependant's update action should allow the garbage collecter to collect these.

First we'll implement MonadReference IO. Our code to handle References to entities is modified to peek through Published to get the value, and to execute all of the subscribers when the value is set.

-- A new implementation that keeps an update list
instance MonadReference IO where
    type Reference = Published
    new = newIORefPublished
    set = setIORefPublished
    get = readIORefPublished

-- Separate implemenations for these, since we'd like to drop the Typeable constraint
newIORefPublished value =
    do
        ref <- newIORef value
        subscribersRef <- newIORef []
        return Published { valueRef = ref, subscribers = subscribersRef }

setIORefPublished published value =
    do
        writeIORef (valueRef published) value
        notify $ subscribers published                 


--readIORefPublished = readIORef . valueRef

readIORefPublished x = do
    putStrLn "getting"
    readIORef $ valueRef x

Notifying the subscribers is a bit tricky. We need to forget about any subscriber that has been removed by garbage collection. I anticipated that a subscriber might be subscribing to things during its update action for the tricky case of binding, so when a subscriber is garbage collected, we don't assume that the new set of subscribers is the old set except for the garabage collected ones, instead we filter them as a separate cleanupWeakRefs step.

notify :: IORef [Weak (IO ())] -> IO ()
notify = go
    where
        go subscribersRef = do
            subscribers <- readIORef subscribersRef
            needsCleanup <- (liftM (any id)) (mapM notifySubscriber subscribers)
            when needsCleanup $ cleanupWeakRefs subscribersRef
        notifySubscriber weakSubscriber = do
            maybeSubscriber <- deRefWeak weakSubscriber
            case maybeSubscriber of
                Nothing -> return True
                Just subscriber -> subscriber >> return False


cleanupWeakRefs :: IORef [Weak a] -> IO ()
cleanupWeakRefs ref = do
    weaks <- readIORef ref
    newWeaks <- (liftM catMaybes) $ mapM testWeak weaks
    writeIORef ref newWeaks
    where
        testWeak weakRef = liftM (>> Just weakRef) $ deRefWeak weakRef

We're done with our handling of entities, time to get on to the interesting and tricky part, the computations. Here's the complete data type for a computation or state dependent value:

-- Data type for building computations
data IORefComputed a where 
    Pure :: a -> IORefComputed a
    Apply :: IORefComputed (b -> a) -> IORefComputed b -> IORefComputed a
    Bound :: IORefComputed b -> (b -> IORefComputed a) -> IORefComputed a
    Tracked :: Published a -> IORefComputed a
    Shared :: Published (Either (IORefComputed a) a) -> IORefComputed a

Pure represents values that don't depend on anything. Apply represents values built by applications of <*>. Bound represents values built using the Monad instance's >>=. Tracked are ordinary state dependent values made using track. Shared are the points at which we remember computations and are notified of changes to tracked values, made using share. We reuse the Published type to store a value and its subscribers, but the value we store is Either the computation that needs to be perfomed when the shared cache is dirty, (IORefComputed a), or the cached value when the cache is clean, a. Here are the instances that let the user use these:

instance Monad IORefComputed where
    return = Pure
    (>>=) = Bound
    (>>) _ = id

instance Applicative IORefComputed where
    pure = return
    (<*>) = Apply

instance Functor IORefComputed where
    fmap = (<*>) . pure     

-- Evaluate computations built in IO
instance MonadComputed IO where
    type Computed = IORefComputed
    track = trackIORefComputed
    runComputed = evalIORefComputed
    share = shareIORefComputed

-- Separate implementations, again to drop the Typeable constraint
trackIORefComputed = return . Tracked

Note: the optimization of >> almost certainly violates the Monad laws in the presence of _|_.

Now we need to make the non-trivial implementations of runComputed and share. First we'll look at share, which does most of the new work:

shareIORefComputed :: IORefComputed a -> IO (IORefComputed a)
shareIORefComputed c =
    case c of          
        Apply cf cx -> do
            sharedf <- shareIORefComputed cf
            sharedx <- shareIORefComputed cx
            case (sharedf, sharedx) of
                -- Optimize away constants
                (Pure f, Pure x) -> return . Pure $ f x 
                _ -> do
                    let sharedc = sharedf <*> sharedx
                    published <- newIORefPublished $ Left sharedc
                    -- What we are going to do when either argument changes
                    markDirty <- makeMarkDirty published published sharedc
                    subscribeTo sharedf markDirty
                    subscribeTo sharedx markDirty
                    return $ Shared published     
        Bound cx k -> do
            sharedx <- shareIORefComputed cx
            case cx of
                -- Optimize away constants
                (Pure x) -> shareIORefComputed $ k x
                _ -> do
                    let dirtyc = sharedx >>= k
                    published <- newIORefPublished $ Left dirtyc
                    -- What we are going to do when the argument to k changes
                    markDirty <- makeMarkDirty published published dirtyc
                    subscribeTo sharedx markDirty            
                    return $ Shared published
        _ -> return c

When we are asked to share an application of <*>, Apply, we first share both of its arguments. We optimize away the value if we can determine it to be constant. If we can't optimize it away, we make a new, initially dirty cache, and ask to be updated whenever either argument changes.

Dealing with >>= is much more difficult. We share the argument to >>=, but we don't know what Computed value the function will return until we evaluate it with each argument. We say that it can be computed by evaluating the entire bind, and ask to have the cache invalidated whenever the argument changes. We will definitely want to improve this later.

In all other cases there's nothing to be done to cache the value; it is either a constant or an already cached Tracked or Shared.

If you are doubting the need for share, replace this definition with

shareIORefComputed c = return c

and run the examples. You'll see that every involved value is read every time we run runComputed. There's nothing you can do in runComputed to modify an existing Computed to know about a place it has been cached, because we can't change existing values in Haskell.

Now we'll implement runComputed. The basic idea is that we evaluate things as before, but when we encounter a dirty shared cache we calculate its new value and update the cache. These updates do not trigger notification of the subscribers.

evalIORefComputed :: IORefComputed a -> IO a
evalIORefComputed c = 
    case c of
        Pure x -> return x
        Apply cf cx -> do
            f <- evalIORefComputed cf
            x <- evalIORefComputed cx
            return (f x) 
        Bound cx k -> do            
            value <- evalIORefComputed cx
            evalIORefComputed (k value)
        Tracked published -> readIORefPublished published
        Shared publishedThunk -> do
            thunk <- readIORefPublished publishedThunk
            case thunk of
                Left computation@(Bound cx k) -> do
                    x <- evalIORefComputed cx
                    -- Make a shared version of the computed computation
                    currentExpression <- shareIORefComputed (k x)
                    let gcKeyedCurrentExpression = Left currentExpression
                    writeIORef (valueRef publishedThunk) gcKeyedCurrentExpression
                    markDirty <- makeMarkDirty publishedThunk gcKeyedCurrentExpression computation
                    subscribeTo currentExpression markDirty
                    evalIORefComputed c
                Left computation -> do
                    value <- evalIORefComputed computation
                    writeIORef (valueRef publishedThunk) (Right value)
                    return value
                Right x ->
                    return x

This is straightforward except for what we do for a dirty shared >>=. We evaluate the argument, then we share the resulting computation. The trick is that we ask that the entire shared thunk be marked dirty when this new value is updated. We ask the garbage collected to forget about this when the dirty marking for this currentExpression is garbage collected. This provides a window during which the thunk might be marked dirty even if it no longer depends on currentExpression. Now a shared bind will be marked dirty by both changes to its argument, changes to the computed value that depended on its argument, and changes to computed values that recently depended on its argument and haven't been garbage collected yet.

The remainder of the implementation is building the weak references to notifications and subscribing to a published value by prepending the new subscriber.

makeMarkDirty :: Published (Either (IORefComputed a) a) -> k -> IORefComputed a -> IO (Weak (IO ())) 
makeMarkDirty published key definition =
    do
        let markDirty = do
            existing <- readIORef (valueRef published)
            case existing of
                Right _ -> setIORefPublished published $ Left definition
                _ -> return ()
        mkWeak key markDirty Nothing


subscribeTo :: IORefComputed a -> Weak (IO ()) -> IO ()
subscribeTo (Tracked published) trigger = modifyIORef' (subscribers published) (trigger :)
subscribeTo (Shared published) trigger = modifyIORef' (subscribers published) (trigger :)    
subscribeTo _ _ = return ()            

The complete compiling example code is on github. It requires the transformers package.

If you run the example code, you'll notice that:

  • After the company name is changed, runComputed people performs only a single get to get the cached value
  • After no changes are made, all three structures each perform only a single get to get the entire cached structure
  • After bob is changed, , runComputed structure2 performs only a single get to get the cached value, and the work done to compute structure3 is less, even though bob is in structure3.
  • structure2, the one built with the Monad instance, requires the most work to compute, due to the extra intermediary shared values.
  • Use Zippers for the views. Zippers + State Monad = win, I think. – itsbruce Oct 23 '13 at 18:14
2

If you need it done efficiently, you'll have to downgrade to mutable datastructures and basically the IO monad.

These updateable references between objects like in OO are available in Haskell aswell. These are IORefs. There are also thread-safe versions of them: MVar and TVar - the choice between them depends on your concurrerency model.

This data structure with different kinds of references between objects is called Graph and it happens so that I'm currently working on a Haskell Graph Database project. The project is getting close to its first release. An in-memory datastructure is already implemented, persistence-layer too, all that's left is client and server. So just keep an eye on it. I'll reddit about it on release. The source repository is here: https://github.com/nikita-volkov/graph-db/, though I haven't been pushing updates for some time so it's a bit outdated.

1

Haskell tries to encourage you to think about values, not entities. By this, I mean that pure code will in most cases structure things by transforming values from one kind to another, not modifying or updating data shared by many others. Equality/identity of objects is defined entirely by their content, not their location. But let me be more concrete.

The general solution to "pure mutation" is to create an endomorphism. In your case, if you had a Directory of people you could read a person's data with a function with the signature

type Name = String
get :: Name -> Directory -> Person

and modify it with a function

mod :: Name -> (Person -> Person) -> (Directory -> Directory)

If you have a lot of modification functions f, g, h, i then you can string them together

mod i . mod h . mod g . mod f

But what's important to realize is that every Directory created in that chain can potentially exist on its own and be updated/read/modified. That's the nature of immutability---data is persistent and we have to manually push our data "through time" as we modify it.


So how do you propagate changes to other structures? In short... you can't. If you're trying to, you're modeling things in ways that are very hard to do purely.

Haskell asks you What do you mean by "propagate"? These objects are based on data in the past and we cannot mutate that fact.


There are definitely limitations to pure, immutable data. Some algorithms cannot translate and are often implemented by recreating "pointer arithmetic" atop a unique name generator and a finite Map. If this is your case, it's better to start introducing impure effects via the ST or IO monads where you can get true memory mutation out of the STRef and IORef container types.

  • It's not that I have a lot of modification functions, but rather a lot of different kinds of directories. So composing modification functions solves a different problem. – rlkw1024 Oct 21 '13 at 19:46
  • "So how do you propagate changes to other structures? In short... you can't. If you're trying to, you're modeling things in ways that are very hard to do purely." Well, practically speaking, many many applications need to use multiple lookup structures on the same data. If you're saying Haskell is ill-suited to that, then that would seem to rule out Haskell for whole classes of applications. Which I would find surprising. Why use Haskell if your app is going to be crammed with impure junk at every turn? Or am I misunderstanding you? – rlkw1024 Oct 21 '13 at 19:47
  • Just to be clear, I simply want the efficiency of multiple lookup structures, which I think is a fair demand to place on a language. I don't care how I get there, as long as I do it in a Haskell way. – rlkw1024 Oct 21 '13 at 19:47
  • If you want mutability then it's available in the ST and IO monadic contexts. Generally, people go out of their way not to use those because the benefits of working in an immutable, pure context are great. I find that it's rare that I need to use IO/ST, but without knowing your entire problem it's hard to say whether you'll need to. – J. Abrahamson Oct 21 '13 at 20:54
  • If you really want to represent a relational graph and do mutating updates to it then I highly recommend building it out of a number of structs linked together with IORefs. It's very similar to C at this point – J. Abrahamson Oct 21 '13 at 20:57
1

The "update all the index structures" approach doesn't have to be needless ceremony, if you model your concept of a "collection of people with efficient lookup operations" as a unitary thing in itself, rather than a bunch of independent collections that you're "manually" trying to keep in sync with each other.

Say you've got a Person type. Then you have a collection of Person objects that you want to be indexed by the types Name and Zip. You could use things like Map Name Person and Map Zip Person, but that doesn't really express your meaning. You don't have two groups of people, one keyed by Name and the other keyed by Zip. You have one group of people, which can by looked up by either Name or Zip, so the code you write and data structures you use should reflect that.

Lets call the collection type People. For your index lookup you'll end up with something like findByName :: People -> Name -> Person and findByZip :: People -> Zip -> Person.

You've also got functions of type Person -> Person that can "update" Person records. So you can use findByName to pull out a Person from a People, then apply an update function to get a new Person. Now what? You'll have to construct a new People with the original Person replaced with a new Person. The "update" functions can't handle this, since they're only concerned with Person values, and don't know anything about your People store (there could even be many People stores). So you'll need a function like updatePeople :: Person -> Person -> People -> People, and you'll end up writing a lot of code like this:

let p = findByName name people
    p' = update p
in updatePeople p p' people

That's a bit boilerplatey. Looks like a job for updateByName :: Name -> (Person -> Person) -> People -> People.

With that, where in an OO language you might write something like people.findByName(name).changeSomething(args) you can now write updateByName name (changeSomething args) people. Not so different!

Note that I haven't talked at all about how any of these data structures or operations are actually implemented. I'm thinking purely about the concepts you have and the operations that make sense on them. That means a scheme like this will work regardless of how you're implementing them; you even can (probably should?) hide the implementation details behind a module barrier. You may well implement People as a record of multiple collections mapping different things to your Person records, but you from the "outside" you can just think of it it a single collection that supports multiple different types of lookup/update operations, and don't have to worry about keeping multiple indexes in sync. It's only within the implementation of the People type and its operations that you have to worry about that, which gives you a place to solve it once and well, rather than having to do it correctly on every operation.

You can take this sort of thing further. With some extra assumptions (such as the knowledge that your Name, Zip, and any other indexes are all implemented with the same pattern just on different fields of Person/People) you can probably use type classes and/or template Haskell to avoid having to implement findByName, findByZip, findByFavouriteSpoon etc separately (although having separate implementations gives you more opportunity to use different indexing strategies depending on the types involved, and may help with optimizing the updates so that e.g. you only have to update the indexes that could possibly be invalidated). You can use type classes and type families to implement a findBy that uses the type of whatever index key it is invoked on to determine which index to use, whether you have separate implementations or a single generic one (although this means that you can't have multiple indexes with the same type).

Here's an example I knocked up when I should've been working, providing type-class-based findBy and updateBy operations:

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts, MultiParamTypeClasses, TypeFamilies #-}

import Data.Map (Map, (!), adjust, delete, insert)


-- sample data declarations
newtype Name = Name String
    deriving (Eq, Ord, Show)

newtype Zip = Zip Int
    deriving (Eq, Ord, Show)

data Person = Person
  { name    :: Name
  , zipCode :: Zip
  }

-- you probably wouldn't export the constructor here
data People = People
  { byName :: Map Name Person
  , byZip  :: Map Zip Person
  }


-- class for stores that can be indexed by key
class FindBy key store where
    type Result key store
    findBy :: key -> store -> Result key store
    updateBy :: key -> (Result key store -> Result key store) -> store -> store


-- helper functions
-- this stuff would be hidden
updateIndex
    :: Ord a
    => (Person -> a) -> Person -> Person -> Map a Person -> Map a Person
updateIndex f p p' = insert (f p') p' . delete (f p)

-- this function has some per-index stuff;
-- note that if you add a new index to People you get a compile error here
-- telling you to account for it
-- also note that we put the *same* person in every map; sharing should mean
-- that we're not duplicating the objects, so no wasted memory
replacePerson :: Person -> Person -> People -> People
replacePerson p p' ps = ps { byName = byName', byZip = byZip' }
  where
    byName' = updateIndex name    p p' $ byName ps
    byZip'  = updateIndex zipCode p p' $ byZip  ps

-- a "default" definition for updateBy in terms of findBy when the store happens
-- to be People and the result happens to be Person
updatePeopleBy
    :: (FindBy key People, Result key People ~ Person)
    => key -> (Person -> Person) -> People -> People
updatePeopleBy k f ps =
    let p = findBy k ps
    in replacePerson p (f p) ps


-- this is basically the "declaration" of all the indexes that can be used
-- externally
instance FindBy Name People where
    type Result Name People = Person
    findBy n ps = byName ps ! n
    updateBy = updatePeopleBy

instance FindBy Zip People where
    type Result Zip People = Person
    findBy z ps = byZip ps ! z
    updateBy = updatePeopleBy
0

Jarret, I strongly suggest you investigate Zippers, both in the simple form documented on the Haskell wiki and the more advanced, generic version developed by Oleg Kiselyov. To quote Oleg,

Zipper is an updateable and yet pure functional cursor into a data structure. It lets us replace an item deep in a data structure, e.g., a tree or a term, without any mutation. The result will share as much of its components with the old structure as possible. The old data structure is still available, which is useful if we wish to 'undo' the operation later on.

The wiki page gives a simple example of how one node of tree can be updated without any need to rebuild the rest of the tree.

If you wrap your different views in zippers and use a shared key, you should see significant efficiency gains. If you wrapped your different views in an appropriate monad (e.g. State Monad), you could update the location with one operation and see all the different views move to point to the "same" obect.

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