44

In django.utils.tree.py:

def _new_instance(cls, children=None, connector=None, negated=False):
        obj = Node(children, connector, negated)
        obj.__class__ = cls
        return obj
    _new_instance = classmethod(_new_instance)

I don't know what classmethod does in this code sample. Can someone explain what it does and how to use it?

162

classmethod is a decorator, wrapping a function, and you can call the resulting object on a class or (equivalently) an instance thereof:

>>> class x(object):
...   def c1(*args): print 'c1', args
...   c1 = classmethod(c1)
...   @classmethod
...   def c2(*args): print 'c2', args
... 
>>> inst = x()
>>> x.c1()
c1 (<class '__main__.x'>,)
>>> x.c2()
c2 (<class '__main__.x'>,)
>>> inst.c1()
c1 (<class '__main__.x'>,)
>>> inst.c2()
c2 (<class '__main__.x'>,)

As you see, whether you define it directly or with decorator syntax, and whether you call it on the class or the instance, the classmethod always receives the class as its first argument.

One of the main uses of classmethod is to define alternative constructors:

>>> class y(object):
...   def __init__(self, astring):
...     self.s = astring
...   @classmethod
...   def fromlist(cls, alist):
...     x = cls('')
...     x.s = ','.join(str(s) for s in alist)
...     return x
...   def __repr__(self):
...     return 'y(%r)' % self.s
...
>>> y1 = y('xx')
>>> y1
y('xx')
>>> y2 = y.fromlist(range(3))
>>> y2
y('0,1,2')

Now if you subclass y, the classmethod keeps working, e.g.:

>>> class k(y):
...   def __repr__(self):
...     return 'k(%r)' % self.s.upper()
...
>>> k1 = k.fromlist(['za','bu'])
>>> k1
k('ZA,BU')
  • 8
    This isn't an altenative constructor, this is a factory method. – t3chb0t Feb 12 '18 at 18:58
  • 1
    @t3chb0t it is a factory method that works as an alternative constructor. – Yasir Jan May 15 at 8:59
8

It makes it possible to call the method on the class instead of an object:

class MyClass(object):
    def _new_instance(cls, blah):
        pass
    _new_instance = classmethod(_new_instance)

MyClass._new_instance("blah")
  • 2
    It's also more commonly used as a decorator: @classmethod def _new_instance(cls, blah): – Chris Lutz Dec 23 '09 at 2:49

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