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I want to split a string by whitespaces, , and ' using a single ruby command.

  1. word.split will split by white spaces;

  2. word.split(",") will split by ,;

  3. word.split("\'") will split by '.

How to do all three at once?

1
  • 1
    Karan, you've probably noticed you don't have to escape the single quote as long as it's between double quotes. Commented Oct 22, 2013 at 5:52

6 Answers 6

164
word = "Now is the,time for'all good people"
word.split(/[\s,']/)
 => ["Now", "is", "the", "time", "for", "all", "good", "people"] 
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  • 24
    Hey, people, thanks for all the upvotes over the past two years, but please don't overlook @oldergod's answer. Commented Nov 27, 2015 at 18:58
66

Regex.

"a,b'c d".split /\s|'|,/
# => ["a", "b", "c", "d"]
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  • 5
    I missed your answer earlier. I prefer it to mine because it reads better (the use of 'or'). You forgot to include |\s, probably because you misread the question. Commented Oct 22, 2013 at 23:31
40

You can use a combination of the split method and the Regexp.union method like so:

delimiters = [',', ' ', "'"]
word.split(Regexp.union(delimiters))
# => ["Now", "is", "the", "time", "for", "all", "good", "people"]

You can even use regex patters in the delimiters.

delimiters = [',', /\s/, "'"]
word.split(Regexp.union(delimiters))
# => ["Now", "is", "the", "time", "for", "all", "good", "people"]

This solution has the advantage of allowing totally dynamic delimiters or any length.

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  • 1
    Hell yeah buddy! Thanks. This is the best solution so far, imo.
    – Vlad
    Commented Sep 24, 2020 at 15:09
  • 1
    This is the most readable for other devs who aren't as familiar with Regex. đź‘Ť Commented Nov 19, 2020 at 0:19
  • Not as concise, but easy on tired eyes.
    – Jerome
    Commented Mar 27, 2021 at 23:03
25

Here is another one :

word = "Now is the,time for'all good people"
word.scan(/\w+/)
# => ["Now", "is", "the", "time", "for", "all", "good", "people"]

\w+ in Ruby regex matches one or more alphanumeric characters. It works by finding the first alphanumeric character, then checking the next character. If the next character is alphanumeric, it's included in the match. This process repeats until a non-alphanumeric character is found.

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  • This is very very clean, for some common circumstances. Can you just add a note as to what w+ does in REGEX please? Thanks! Commented Sep 12, 2023 at 14:39
  • @JoshuaPinter \w+ in Ruby regex matches one or more alphanumeric characters. It works by finding the first alphanumeric character, then checking the next character. If the next character is alphanumeric, it's included in the match. This process repeats until a non-alphanumeric character is found. Commented Sep 13, 2023 at 14:49
  • Thanks! I've added it to your answer for easy reference. Commented Sep 13, 2023 at 15:53
4
x = "one,two, three four" 

new_array = x.gsub(/,|'/, " ").split
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  • I like your approach to it and yes it gives the correct solution.
    – Rishav
    Commented Aug 2, 2017 at 11:29
1

I know this is an old thread but I just happened to stumble on it and thought I would leave another answer. I personally like to avoid using regex, both because I find it hard to read and because its almost always slower than using other built in methods. So, instead of the aforementioned regex solutions, I would also consider using the following:

word.gsub(",", " ").gsub("'", " ").split

The first gsub replaces all occurrences of , with a space. The second gsub replaces all occurrences of ' with a space. This results in whitespace at all the desired locations. And then split with no argument simply splits on whitespace.

Its only slightly faster than some of the aforementioned solutions, but I do believe it is faster than any others that have been mentioned.

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