4

I need to modify a very old project written some years ago in win32 that MUST run on windows 2000 server.

Having recently upgraded my computer i moved to visual studio 2012 and hence my problems.

Ihave read a lot of posts here, and i kinda got confused.

first using platform toolsets i need to install vs2008 & vs2010 right? this is unacceptable.

second, some posts say that i need to overwrite the function DecodePointer/EncodePointer .

third, just be using the defines

#ifndef WINVER
#define WINVER 0x0501
#endif

#ifndef _WIN32_WINNT   // Specifies that the minimum required platform is Windows XP.
#define _WIN32_WINNT 0x0501
#endif

option 1 is not acceptable. which of the other 2 options work with vs2012???

thanks to all.

4

The runtime for the VS2012 compiler supports targetting XP, but does not support earlier versions. In fact, on release, XP targetting was not supported and that was added in a later update. If you must support Win2k, you must use the toolset from an earlier version of VS that does support Win2k.

  • 1
    And VS 2008 was the last version to target W2000. So it needs to be installed. This answer tells you how to select the VS 2008 toolchain in VS 2012: stackoverflow.com/questions/12597604/… – Nikos C. Oct 22 '13 at 11:44
  • Note that using VS2008 makes point 2 redundant (it doesn't need those functions). Point 3 is mainly a method to make sure you don't accidentally use Vista functions in XP. (Or, suitably modified, XP functions in Win2K). – MSalters Oct 22 '13 at 13:24
4

Here's an expansion on Cody Gray's code for VS2017. It could use a few extra eyeballs to ensure it would work properly. As of now apps will start and run on NT4 built with VS2017. It will also work on Win98 if using MS Layer for Unicode (unicows).

.386
.MODEL flat, stdcall

    USE_W_STRINGS EQU 1                 ; Flag on which GetModuleHandle version to use
    USE_WIN9X     EQU 1                 ; Flag on if to include Win9x specific requirements

   EXTRN STDCALL ImplementGetModuleHandleExW@12 : PROC
   EXTRN STDCALL ImplementSetFilePointerEx@20 : PROC

   ;; Declare functions that we will call statically
   IF USE_W_STRINGS
    EXTRN STDCALL _imp__GetModuleHandleW@4  : DWORD
   ELSE
    EXTRN STDCALL _imp__GetModuleHandleA@4  : DWORD
   ENDIF

   EXTRN STDCALL _imp__GetProcAddress@8    : DWORD


.DATA
   ;; Override the import symbols from kernel32.dll
   __imp__InitializeSListHead@4    DWORD DownlevelInitializeSListHead
   __imp__GetModuleHandleExW@12    DWORD DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW
   __imp__EncodePointer@4          DWORD DownlevelEncodeDecodePointer
   __imp__DecodePointer@4          DWORD DownlevelEncodeDecodePointer
   ;__imp__HeapSetInformation@16 dd DownlevelHeapSetInformation
   __imp__SetFilePointerEx@20      DWORD ImplementSetFilePointerEx@20

   EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__InitializeSListHead@4 : DWORD
   EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__GetModuleHandleExW@12 : DWORD
   EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__EncodePointer@4 : DWORD
   EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__DecodePointer@4 : DWORD
   ;EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__HeapSetInformation@16 : DWORD
   EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__SetFilePointerEx@20 : DWORD


   ; For Win9x support - need to change return value to TRUE for the crt startup
   IF USE_WIN9X
    __imp__InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount@8 DWORD DownlevelInitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount
    EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount@8 : DWORD
   ENDIF

CONST SEGMENT
   IF USE_W_STRINGS
     kszKernel32            DB 'k', 00H, 'e', 00H, 'r', 00H, 'n', 00H, 'e', 00H, 'l', 00H, '3', 00H, '2', 00H, 00H, 00H
     kszAdvApi32            DB 'a', 00H, 'd', 00H, 'v', 00H, 'a', 00H, 'p', 00H, 'i', 00H, '3', 00H, '2', 00H, 00H, 00H
   ELSE
     kszKernel32            DB "kernel32", 00H
     kszAdvApi32            DB "advapi32", 00H
   ENDIF

   kszInitializeSListHead DB "InitializeSListHead", 00H
   kszGetModuleHandleExW  DB "GetModuleHandleExW", 00H

   kszInitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount DB "InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount", 00H
   kszGetVersion DB "GetVersion", 00H

  ; Windows XP and Server 2003 and later have RtlGenRandom, which is exported as SystemFunction036.
  ; If needed, we could fall back to CryptGenRandom(), but that will be much slower
  ; because it has to drag in the entire crypto API.
  ; (See also: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/michael_howard/2005/01/14/cryptographically-secure-random-number-on-windows-without-using-cryptoapi/)
;   kszSystemFunction036   DB "SystemFunction036", 00H
CONST ENDS

.CODE

   ; C++ translation:
   ;    extern "C" VOID WINAPI DownlevelInitializeSListHead(PSLIST_HEADER pHead)
   ;    {
   ;       const HMODULE hmodKernel32 = ::GetModuleHandleW(L"kernel32");
   ;       typedef decltype(InitializeSListHead)* pfnInitializeSListHead;
   ;       const pfnInitializeSListHead pfn = reinterpret_cast<pfnInitializeSListHead>(::GetProcAddress(hmodKernel32, "InitializeSListHead"));
   ;       if (pfn)
   ;       {
   ;          // call WinAPI function
   ;          pfn(pHead);
   ;       }
   ;       else
   ;       {
   ;          // fallback implementation for downlevel
   ;          pHead->Alignment = 0;
   ;       }
   ;    }
   DownlevelInitializeSListHead PROC
      ;; Get a handle to the DLL containing the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszKernel32
   IF USE_W_STRINGS
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleW@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.
   ELSE
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleA@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.
   ENDIF

       ;; Attempt to obtain a pointer to the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszInitializeSListHead       ; Push 2nd parameter (string containing function's name).
      push  eax                                 ; Push 1st parameter (handle to the library).
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetProcAddress@8    ; Returns the pointer to the function in EAX.

      ;; Test for success, and call the function if we succeeded.
      test  eax, eax                            ; See if we successfully retrieved a pointer to the function.
      je    SHORT FuncNotSupported              ; Jump on failure (ptr == 0), or fall through in the most-likely case.
      jmp   eax                                 ; We succeeded (ptr != 0), so tail-call the function.

      ;; The dynamic call failed, presumably because the function isn't available.
      ;; So do what _RtlInitializeSListHead@4 (which is what we jump to on uplevel platforms) does,
      ;; which is to set pHead->Alignment to 0. It is a QWORD-sized value, so 32-bit code must
      ;; clear both of the DWORD halves.
    FuncNotSupported:
      mov   edx, DWORD PTR [esp+4]      ; get pHead->Alignment
      xor   eax, eax
      mov   DWORD PTR [edx],   eax      ; pHead->Alignment = 0
      mov   DWORD PTR [edx+4], eax
      ret   4
   DownlevelInitializeSListHead ENDP


   ; C++ translation:
   ;     extern "C" BOOL WINAPI DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW(DWORD dwFlags, LPCTSTR lpModuleName, HMODULE* phModule)
   ;     {
   ;        const HMODULE hmodKernel32 = ::GetModuleHandleW(L"kernel32");
   ;        typedef decltype(GetModuleHandleExW)* pfnGetModuleHandleExW;
   ;        const pfnGetModuleHandleExW pfn = reinterpret_cast<pfnGetModuleHandleExW>(::GetProcAddress(hmodKernel32, "GetModuleHandleExW"));
   ;        if (pfn)
   ;        {
   ;           // call WinAPI function
   ;           return pfn(dwFlags, lpModuleName, phModule);
   ;        }
   ;        else
   ;        {
   ;           // fallback for downlevel: return failure
   ;           return FALSE;
   ;        }
   ;     }
   DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW PROC
      ;; Get a handle to the DLL containing the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszKernel32
   IF USE_W_STRINGS
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleW@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.
   ELSE
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleA@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.
   ENDIF

       ;; Attempt to obtain a pointer to the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszGetModuleHandleExW        ; Push 2nd parameter (string containing function's name).
      push  eax                                 ; Push 1st parameter (handle to the library).
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetProcAddress@8    ; Returns the pointer to the function in EAX.

      ;; Test for success, and call the function if we succeeded.
      test  eax, eax                            ; See if we successfully retrieved a pointer to the function.
      je    SHORT FuncNotSupported              ; Jump on failure (ptr == 0), or fall through in the most-likely case.
      jmp   eax                                 ; We succeeded (ptr != 0), so tail-call the function.

      ;; The dynamic call failed, presumably because the function isn't available.
      ;; The basic VS 2015 CRT (used in a simple Win32 app) only calls this function
      ;; in try_cor_exit_process(), as called from common_exit (both in exit.cpp),
      ;; where it uses it to attempt to get a handle to the module mscoree.dll.
      ;; Since we don't care about managed apps, that attempt should rightfully fail.
      ;; If this turns out to be used in other contexts, we'll need to revisit this
      ;; and implement a proper fallback.
    FuncNotSupported:
      jmp   ImplementGetModuleHandleExW@12

   DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW ENDP

   DownlevelEncodeDecodePointer proc
      mov eax, [esp+4]
      ret 4
   DownlevelEncodeDecodePointer endp

;   DownlevelHeapSetInformation proc
;      mov eax, 1
;      ret 10h
;   DownlevelHeapSetInformation endp

;   DownlevelSystemFunction036 PROC
;      int 3   ; break --- stub unimplemented
;      ret 8
;   DownlevelSystemFunction036 ENDP


; Win9x section
IF USE_WIN9X

   ; here we need to return 1 for the crt startup code which checks the return value which on 9x is "none" (throws exception instead)
   ; This section will change the imported function on the first call for NT based OS so that every call doesn't require additional processing.

   DownlevelInitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount proc

      push  OFFSET kszKernel32
   IF USE_W_STRINGS
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleW@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.
   ELSE
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleA@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.
   ENDIF

       ;; Save copy of handle
      push  eax

       ;; Attempt to obtain a pointer to the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszInitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount ; Push 2nd parameter (string containing function's name).
      push  eax                                 ; Push 1st parameter (handle to the library).
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetProcAddress@8    ; Returns the pointer to the function in EAX.

      ;; Test for success, and call the function if we succeeded.
      test  eax, eax                            ; See if we successfully retrieved a pointer to the function.
      jz    SHORT FuncNotSupported              ; Jump on failure (ptr == 0), or fall through in the most-likely case.

      ;; save address and get back kernel32 handle
      xchg  dword ptr [esp],eax

       ;; Attempt to obtain a pointer to the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszGetVersion                ; Push 2nd parameter (string containing function's name).
      push  eax                                 ; Push 1st parameter (handle to the library).
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetProcAddress@8    ; Returns the pointer to the function in EAX.

      ;; See if function exists
      test  eax,eax
      jz    SHORT FuncNotSupported

      ;; call GetVersion
      call  eax

      ;; check if win9x
      test  eax,80000000h
      pop   eax                                 ; get back address of InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount function
      jz    WinNT

      ;; for Win9x we need to call and then change return code
      push  [esp+8]                             ; Copy the 1st parameter (+4 for IP return address, +4 for fist param)
      push  [esp+8]                             ; Copy the 2nd parameter (recall esp moves on push)
      call  eax
      mov   eax,1
      ret   8

WinNT:
      ;; Change the call address for next calls and call directly
      mov   __imp__InitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount@8,eax
      jmp   eax


      ;; We should never end up here but if we do, fail the call
    FuncNotSupported:
      pop  eax
      xor  eax,eax
      ret  8

   DownlevelInitializeCriticalSectionAndSpinCount endp

ENDIF

END

There is a part 2 as well:

// Win9x:
//
// The CRT now uses several "W" versions of functions which is more practial to require
// the use of the Microsoft Layer for Unicode (MSLU) for Windows 9x to implement it.  The 
// unicows.dll (for 9x) should be placed in the program folder with the .exe if using it.
// unicows.dll is only loaded on 9x platforms. The way Win9x works without the MSLU is 
// that several "W" version of functions are located in kernel32.dll but they are just a
// stub that returns failure code. To implement the unicode layer (unicows) the unicode.lib
// must be linked prior to the other libs that should then linked in after unicode.lib.  
// The libraries are:
//
//    kernel32.lib advapi32.lib user32.lib gdi32.lib shell32.lib comdlg32.lib 
//    version.lib mpr.lib rasapi32.lib winmm.lib winspool.lib vfw32.lib 
//    secur32.lib oleacc.lib oledlg.lib sensapi.lib
//


#include <windows.h>

// pull items from ntdef.h
#define NT_SUCCESS(Status) (((NTSTATUS)(Status)) >= 0)
typedef _Return_type_success_(return >= 0) LONG NTSTATUS;

//
// implementation of replacement function for GetModuleHandleExW
//
extern "C" BOOL WINAPI ImplementGetModuleHandleExW(DWORD dwFlags, LPCWSTR lpModuleName, HMODULE* phModule)
{
  // check flag combinations
  if (phModule==NULL ||
      dwFlags & ~(GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_PIN | GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_UNCHANGED_REFCOUNT | GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_FROM_ADDRESS) ||
      ((dwFlags & GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_PIN) && (dwFlags & GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_UNCHANGED_REFCOUNT)) ||
      (lpModuleName==NULL && (dwFlags & GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_FROM_ADDRESS))) {
    SetLastError(ERROR_INVALID_PARAMETER);
    return FALSE;
  }


  // check if to get by address
  if (dwFlags & GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_FROM_ADDRESS) {
    *phModule = NULL;

    typedef PVOID (NTAPI *LPFN_RtlPcToFileHeader)(PVOID PcValue, PVOID * BaseOfImage);

    const HMODULE hmodkernel32 = GetModuleHandleW(L"kernel32");
    const LPFN_RtlPcToFileHeader pfnRtlPcToFileHeader = reinterpret_cast<LPFN_RtlPcToFileHeader>(GetProcAddress(hmodkernel32, "RtlPcToFileHeader"));

    if (pfnRtlPcToFileHeader) {
      // use RTL function (nt4+)
      pfnRtlPcToFileHeader((PVOID)lpModuleName, (PVOID*)phModule);
    }
    else {
      // query memory directly (win9x)
      MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION mbi; 
      if (VirtualQuery((PVOID)lpModuleName, &mbi, sizeof(mbi)) >= offsetof(MEMORY_BASIC_INFORMATION, AllocationProtect)) {
        *phModule = reinterpret_cast<HMODULE>(mbi.AllocationBase);
      }
    }
  }
  else {
    // standard getmodulehandle - to see if loaded
    *phModule = GetModuleHandleW(lpModuleName);
  }


  // check if module found
  if (*phModule == NULL) {
    SetLastError(ERROR_DLL_NOT_FOUND);
    return FALSE;
  }

  // check if reference needs updating
  if ((dwFlags & GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_UNCHANGED_REFCOUNT) == 0) {

    typedef NTSTATUS(NTAPI *LPFN_LdrAddRefDll)(ULONG Flags, PVOID BaseAddress);
    #define LDR_ADDREF_DLL_PIN   0x00000001

    const HMODULE hmodntdll = GetModuleHandleW(L"ntdll");
    const LPFN_LdrAddRefDll pfnLdrAddRefDll = reinterpret_cast<LPFN_LdrAddRefDll>(GetProcAddress(hmodntdll, "LdrAddRefDll"));

    if (pfnLdrAddRefDll) {
      // update dll reference
      if (!NT_SUCCESS(pfnLdrAddRefDll((dwFlags & GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_PIN) ? LDR_ADDREF_DLL_PIN : 0, *phModule))) {
        SetLastError(ERROR_GEN_FAILURE);
        return FALSE;
      }
    }
    else if (dwFlags & GET_MODULE_HANDLE_EX_FLAG_PIN) {
      SetLastError(ERROR_NOT_SUPPORTED);
      return FALSE;
    }
    else {
      WCHAR *filename;
      if ((filename=reinterpret_cast<WCHAR*>(VirtualAlloc(NULL, MAX_PATH*sizeof(WCHAR), MEM_COMMIT, PAGE_READWRITE)))!=NULL) {
        DWORD ret = GetModuleFileNameW(*phModule, filename, MAX_PATH);
        if (ret < MAX_PATH) {
          *phModule = LoadLibraryW(filename);
        }
        else *phModule = NULL;
        VirtualFree(filename, 0, MEM_RELEASE);
        // ensure load library success
        if (*phModule == NULL) {
          return FALSE;
        }
      }
      else {
        SetLastError(ERROR_NOT_ENOUGH_MEMORY);
        return FALSE;
      }
    }
  }
  return TRUE;
}

//
// implementation of replacement function for SetFilePointerEx
//
extern "C" BOOL WINAPI ImplementSetFilePointerEx(HANDLE hFile, LARGE_INTEGER liDistanceToMove, PLARGE_INTEGER lpNewFilePointer, DWORD dwMoveMethod)
{
  DWORD ret=SetFilePointer(hFile, liDistanceToMove.LowPart, &liDistanceToMove.HighPart, dwMoveMethod);
  if (ret == INVALID_SET_FILE_POINTER) {
    if (GetLastError() != NO_ERROR) {
      return FALSE;
    }
  }
  // check if provide file location
  if (lpNewFilePointer) {
    lpNewFilePointer->LowPart = ret;
    lpNewFilePointer->HighPart = liDistanceToMove.HighPart;
  }
  // success
  return TRUE;
}
2

VS 2008 works to target Windows 2000 out of the box, as you said. You don't need anything extra. If you prefer to use a newer version of the IDE, installing multiple versions of Visual Studio simultaneously (always install the oldest versions first, working "forward" in time) will allow you to, e.g., work in VS 2010 but tell it to build using the VS 2008 toolchain. You obviously won't be able to benefit from compiler features introduced with VS 2010, but you will get to use the newer IDE.

You can use VS 2010 to target Windows 2000 with the EncodePointer/DecodePointer trick. The issue here is that the VS 2010 C runtime library (CRT) requires these functions (it calls them internally), but these functions do not exist on versions of the OS prior to Windows XP SP2. However, if you write stubs and link your executable against those (while also statically linking to the CRT, so it will actually find and use those stubs), then you can run a VS 2010-compiled EXE on Windows 2000. Note that you will also need to set the minimum required version to 5.0 in the linker settings. (You'll get a link-time warning that this is not a valid, supported version when you do so, but you can simply ignore this warning. It does work, and the field does get properly set in the PE header.) This is undoubtedly a dirty trick, but I know that it works very well; I do it in several of my projects. My stubs dynamically call the real EncodePointer/DecodePointer functions if they are available on the current OS, and if not, fall back to basically a no-op (giving up the security benefits on these downlevel OSes). Suma has already covered this trick quite well in an answer to a related question.

The WINVER and _WIN32_WINNT defines really don't have anything to do with this. They just control which function prototypes the Windows SDK headers actually define. The idea is that you set these to your target Windows version, and then you will only be able to statically link to functions that actually exist on that version of Windows. You can still dynamically call (via GetModuleHandle/LoadLibrary → GetProcAddress) newer functions when running on an appropriate version of Windows, and gracefully fall back if they are not supported. If you try to statically link to functions that do not exist, the loader will generate an error when you try to run your application. This is easy, though, because this is something that is entirely within your control as a developer. The problem is when the CRT (a library that you don't control) calls functions that don't exist, like EncodePointer. That's why the above-described workaround is required. The values of WINVER and _WIN32_WINNT have no actual effect on the compiler or the linker.

You can probably get away with a similar trick for VS 2012. I started working on this a while back with VS 2015 using the built-in XP-targeting support, and I did manage to get a "Hello world" app running on Windows 2000. If anything, it should be easier with VS 2012 than VS 2015. But it was not easy, and it would probably be a support nightmare for any real-world application. Still, it was a fun experiment, and it confirms what everyone already knows: the problem here is not the compiler or the linker. The PE format is still the same; any compiler or linker that targets Win32 can build binaries that run on any version of Windows NT. The problem is just the C runtime library attempting to call functions that do not exist on downlevel operating systems.

The way to go about testing this is to compile an EXE with VS 2012 using the above-described trick for EncodePointer/DecodePointer. You will also, of course, need to make sure that you've set the minimum required version to 5.0 in the linker settings. (If this doesn't work, and it might not, you will need to manually change it as a post-build step using editbin.exe.) Then, simply try running that executable on Windows 2000. You will undoubtedly get an error message indicating that the application cannot start because of a missing statically-linked function. You'll then need to research that function and stub it out, just as you had to do for EncodePointer/DecodePointer. Chances are, it will be more difficult, because it is probably going to be a function that does meaningful work, which means that you can't simply NOP it out. Once you've fixed the dependency on that function, repeat the process again for each function that the W2K loader complains about. (You can also use Dependency Walker or equivalent utilities to obtain this information.) Once you work through all of the non-existent functions, you'll finally have an EXE that runs.

For VS 2015, I had to write stubs for InitializeSListHead, GetModuleHandleEx, and SystemFunction036 (which is the export name for RtlGenRandom), in addition to EncodePointer and DecodePointer. I expect you'll have a similar experience with VS 2012. Replacing the first two is actually relatively straightforward. For InitializeSListHead, I just reverse-engineered the corresponding functions on Windows XP, and wrote my own implementation for downlevel OS versions. For GetModuleHandleEx, it's only called by the CRT in a context that enables support for managed apps. Since I didn't care about those, I just turned it into a no-op that returns failure. SystemFunction036 (RtlGenRandom) is more difficult, but if you're not using rand (and you probably shouldn't be), then you don't need it either. I just stubbed it as a breakpoint (int 3). You could also stub it to call CryptGenRandom. If you do better with code than prose, here is an approximation of the stubs I used in my "Hello world" app:

.386
.MODEL flat, stdcall


.DATA
   ;; Override the import symbols from kernel32.dll
   __imp__InitializeSListHead@4    DWORD DownlevelInitializeSListHead
   __imp__GetModuleHandleExW@12    DWORD DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW
   EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__InitializeSListHead@4 : DWORD
   EXTERNDEF STDCALL __imp__GetModuleHandleExW@12 : DWORD

   ;; Declare functions that we will call statically
   EXTRN STDCALL _imp__GetModuleHandleW@4  : DWORD
   EXTRN STDCALL _imp__GetProcAddress@8    : DWORD

CONST SEGMENT
   kszKernel32            DB 'k', 00H, 'e', 00H, 'r', 00H, 'n', 00H, 'e', 00H, 'l', 00H, '3', 00H, '2', 00H, 00H, 00H
   kszAdvApi32            DB 'a', 00H, 'd', 00H, 'v', 00H, 'a', 00H, 'p', 00H, 'i', 00H, '3', 00H, '2', 00H, 00H, 00H
   kszInitializeSListHead DB "InitializeSListHead", 00H
   kszGetModuleHandleExW  DB "GetModuleHandleExW", 00H

  ; Windows XP and Server 2003 and later have RtlGenRandom, which is exported as SystemFunction036.
  ; If needed, we could fall back to CryptGenRandom(), but that will be much slower
  ; because it has to drag in the entire crypto API.
  ; (See also: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/michael_howard/2005/01/14/cryptographically-secure-random-number-on-windows-without-using-cryptoapi/)
   kszSystemFunction036   DB "SystemFunction036", 00H
CONST ENDS

.CODE

   ; C++ translation:
   ;    extern "C" VOID WINAPI DownlevelInitializeSListHead(PSLIST_HEADER pHead)
   ;    {
   ;       const HMODULE hmodKernel32 = ::GetModuleHandleW(L"kernel32");
   ;       typedef decltype(InitializeSListHead)* pfnInitializeSListHead;
   ;       const pfnInitializeSListHead pfn = reinterpret_cast<pfnInitializeSListHead>(::GetProcAddress(hmodKernel32, "InitializeSListHead"));
   ;       if (pfn)
   ;       {
   ;          // call WinAPI function
   ;          pfn(pHead);
   ;       }
   ;       else
   ;       {
   ;          // fallback implementation for downlevel
   ;          pHead->Alignment = 0;
   ;       }
   ;    }
   DownlevelInitializeSListHead PROC
      ;; Get a handle to the DLL containing the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszKernel32
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleW@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.

       ;; Attempt to obtain a pointer to the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszInitializeSListHead       ; Push 2nd parameter (string containing function's name).
      push  eax                                 ; Push 1st parameter (handle to the library).
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetProcAddress@8    ; Returns the pointer to the function in EAX.

      ;; Test for success, and call the function if we succeeded.
      test  eax, eax                            ; See if we successfully retrieved a pointer to the function.
      je    SHORT FuncNotSupported              ; Jump on failure (ptr == 0), or fall through in the most-likely case.
      jmp   eax                                 ; We succeeded (ptr != 0), so tail-call the function.

      ;; The dynamic call failed, presumably because the function isn't available.
      ;; So do what _RtlInitializeSListHead@4 (which is what we jump to on uplevel platforms) does,
      ;; which is to set pHead->Alignment to 0. It is a QWORD-sized value, so 32-bit code must
      ;; clear both of the DWORD halves.
   FuncNotSupported:
      mov   edx, DWORD PTR [esp+4]      ; get pHead->Alignment
      xor   eax, eax
      mov   DWORD PTR [edx],   eax      ; pHead->Alignment = 0
      mov   DWORD PTR [edx+4], eax
      ret   4
   DownlevelInitializeSListHead ENDP


   ; C++ translation:
   ;     extern "C" BOOL WINAPI DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW(DWORD dwFlags, LPCTSTR lpModuleName, HMODULE* phModule)
   ;     {
   ;        const HMODULE hmodKernel32 = ::GetModuleHandleW(L"kernel32");
   ;        typedef decltype(GetModuleHandleExW)* pfnGetModuleHandleExW;
   ;        const pfnGetModuleHandleExW pfn = reinterpret_cast<pfnGetModuleHandleExW>(::GetProcAddress(hmodKernel32, "GetModuleHandleExW"));
   ;        if (pfn)
   ;        {
   ;           // call WinAPI function
   ;           return pfn(dwFlags, lpModuleName, phModule);
   ;        }
   ;        else
   ;        {
   ;           // fallback for downlevel: return failure
   ;           return FALSE;
   ;        }
   ;     }
   DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW PROC
      ;; Get a handle to the DLL containing the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszKernel32
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetModuleHandleW@4  ; Returns the handle to the library in EAX.

       ;; Attempt to obtain a pointer to the function of interest.
      push  OFFSET kszGetModuleHandleExW        ; Push 2nd parameter (string containing function's name).
      push  eax                                 ; Push 1st parameter (handle to the library).
      call  DWORD PTR _imp__GetProcAddress@8    ; Returns the pointer to the function in EAX.

      ;; Test for success, and call the function if we succeeded.
      test  eax, eax                            ; See if we successfully retrieved a pointer to the function.
      je    SHORT FuncNotSupported              ; Jump on failure (ptr == 0), or fall through in the most-likely case.
      jmp   eax                                 ; We succeeded (ptr != 0), so tail-call the function.

      ;; The dynamic call failed, presumably because the function isn't available.
      ;; The basic VS 2015 CRT (used in a simple Win32 app) only calls this function
      ;; in try_cor_exit_process(), as called from common_exit (both in exit.cpp),
      ;; where it uses it to attempt to get a handle to the module mscoree.dll.
      ;; Since we don't care about managed apps, that attempt should rightfully fail.
      ;; If this turns out to be used in other contexts, we'll need to revisit this
      ;; and implement a proper fallback.
  FuncNotSupported:
      xor   eax, eax   ; return failure
      ret   12
   DownlevelGetModuleHandleExW ENDP


   DownlevelSystemFunction036 PROC
      int 3   ; break --- stub unimplemented
      ret 8
   DownlevelSystemFunction036 ENDP

END

Roy points out in a comment that Microsoft has provided an MIT-licensed implementation of SList that only requires InterlockedCompareExchange(). This will make your job slightly easier, as you won't have to reverse-engineer any of the SList functions as I did.

It goes without saying that you should avoid at all costs MFC, ATL, and other libraries whose source code is outside of your control. They will drag in dependencies on functions that are not available on downlevel versions of the operating system, causing even more work for you. You will really need to limit yourself to raw Win32, meaning that the only library you'll have to worry about is the CRT.

Whew! That should get you started. If, instead of being intrigued, you're massively intimidated by this, you almost certainly have no business with hacks such as this. Use an older version of the compiler.

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