92

Is it possible to modify a UIImage's renderingMode from a storyboard or xib editor?

The goal is to apply tintColor to the particular UIImageView object.

14 Answers 14

98

Here's how you can do it in .xib or storyboard files:

(Obj-C) Create a category on UIImageView:

@interface UIImageView (Utils)

- (void)setImageRenderingMode:(UIImageRenderingMode)renderMode;

@end

@implementation UIImageView (Utils)

- (void)setImageRenderingMode:(UIImageRenderingMode)renderMode
{
    NSAssert(self.image, @"Image must be set before setting rendering mode");
    self.image = [self.image imageWithRenderingMode:renderMode];
}

@end

(Swift 4) Create an extension for UIImageView:

extension UIImageView {
    func setImageRenderingMode(_ renderMode: UIImage.RenderingMode) {
        assert(image != nil, "Image must be set before setting rendering mode")
        // AlwaysOriginal as an example
        image = image?.withRenderingMode(.alwaysOriginal)
    }
}

Then in the Identity Inspector in the xib file, add a runtime attribute:

enter image description here

  • 40
    What I love about this answer, is that it is an answer to the question. – algal Sep 24 '14 at 19:00
  • 1
    I would prefer to create an UIImageView subclass rather to do the key value setting. Because, it this easier to set up and we could avoid the number setting to the enumeration value. For example: ` @implementation TemplateRenderingImageView -(id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)aDecoder{ self = [super initWithCoder:aDecoder]; if (self) { self.image = [self.image imageWithRenderingMode:UIImageRenderingModeAlwaysTemplate]; } return self; } @end` – john fantasy Oct 24 '14 at 2:44
  • 1
    Great answer! The screenshots were helpful. – BigSauce Dec 11 '14 at 8:05
  • 1
    Doesn't work with Launch Screen.xib of course because you can't use user defined runtime attributes with it. – Steve Moser Sep 8 '15 at 15:41
  • 3
    hardcoding 2 as a value is bad bad bad.. The use of xcassets catalog is the right answer. – tGilani Sep 29 '15 at 22:14
193

You can set the image rendering mode not in the .xib file, but in an .xcassets library.

After adding an image to an asset library, select the image and open the attributes inspector on the right side of Xcode. Find the attribute 'Render As' and set it to 'template'.

After setting an image's rendering mode, you can add a tint color to the UIImageView in a .xib or .storyboard file to adjust the image color.

This sets the property on the image wherever it's used rather than just in one interface builder file, but in almost all cases (that I've encountered) this is the behavior you want.

Screenshot of Xcode showing attributes inspector for an image

A few things to note:

  • The image color will not appear to have changed in interface builder (as of Xcode 6.1.1) but will work when the application is run.
  • I've experienced some bugginess with this feature and in some situations I've had to remove and re-add the UIImageView. I have not looked into that deeply.
  • This also works great on other UIKitComponents such as images in UIButton's and UIBarButtonItem's.
  • If you have a bunch of white images that are invisible in your asset library, making them black/transparent images and changing the rendering mode will make your life up to 10x better.
  • 15
    There seem to be a bug with tint color on UIImageView, so the tint color is not always shown when running the app. – Fogh Jan 20 '15 at 8:49
  • @Fogh I've had some inconsistent bugs like that as well. Does setting the tint color programmatically fix this? – Anthony Mattox Jan 20 '15 at 14:12
  • 2
    I can confirm that there is an issue when setting the tint color in IB. Setting it programmatically works. I filed a bug #20305518 for it. – Nikolay Derkach Mar 26 '15 at 6:41
  • 1
    @AxelGuilmin Yup. Actually only the alpha channel is used, so it could be any color as long as the transparency is what you want. – Anthony Mattox Feb 25 '16 at 16:22
  • 1
    It works now with Xcode 7.3 (7D175)! Although the accepted answer is a very intuitive workaround, I prefer this answer instead. – nstein Mar 28 '16 at 8:04
43

Using the template rendering mode with a UIImageView in a storyboard or xib is very buggy, both on iOS 7 and iOS 8.

On iOS 7

The UIImage is not properly decoded from the storyboard/xib. If you inspect the imageView.image.renderingMode property in the viewDidLoad method, you will notice that it is always UIImageRenderingModeAutomatic, even if you set it to Render As Template Image in your xcassets file.

To workaround, you have to manually set the rendering mode:

self.imageView.image = [self.imageView.image imageWithRenderingMode:UIImageRenderingModeAlwaysTemplate];

On iOS 8

The UIImage is properly decoded and its renderingMode property reflects what was chosen in the xcassets file but the image is not tinted.

To workaround, you have two options:

  1. Set the tintColor property in the User Defined Runtime Attributes instead of the Attributes inspector pane.

or

  1. Manually reset the tintColor:
UIColor *tintColor = self.imageView.tintColor;
self.imageView.tintColor = nil;
self.imageView.tintColor = tintColor;

You can pick your preferred option, both properly tint the image.

(If you are compiling with Xcode 6.2, just doing self.imageView.tintColor = self.imageView.tintColor; is enough but this doesn’t work anymore if you are compiling with Xcode 6.3)

Conclusion

If you need to support both iOS 7 and iOS 8, you’ll need both workarounds. If you only have to support iOS 8, only one workaround is needed.

  • 2
    Thanks. Only workaround #2 is working for me in Xcode 7 and iOS 8. – surfrider Dec 23 '15 at 11:14
  • 3
    I confirm that the workaround for iOS 8 is also valable for iOS 9. – Michael Pirotte Jan 28 '16 at 8:45
  • 1
    I am definitely seeing the same thing on Xcode 7 -- the user attribute workaround was fine. Thanks! – Geoffrey Wiseman Aug 15 '16 at 14:22
  • manually resetting the tintColor in awakeFromNib did it! (the image was set to template in the .xcassets catalog too, otherwise you'd have to make a template image from the original). Thanks!! – horseshoe7 Feb 20 '17 at 10:22
15

Setting imageView RenderingMode to use the tint color in the storyboard can be reduced to a one-liner:

[self.imageView setImage:[self.imageView.image imageWithRenderingMode:UIImageRenderingModeAlwaysTemplate]];

Then the image and tint color can all be set in the Storyboard.

13

You may fix .xib issues with an extension:

import UIKit

// fixing Bug in XCode
// http://openradar.appspot.com/18448072
extension UIImageView {
    override open func awakeFromNib() {
        super.awakeFromNib()
        self.tintColorDidChange()
    }
}

Source: https://gist.github.com/buechner/3b97000a6570a2bfbc99c005cb010bac

Amazing, this bug has been around for like 4-5 years now.

  • 3
    This should be selected as the answer – farzadshbfn Jun 19 '18 at 12:37
  • Still a bug and this still fixes it as of iOS 12.0. – Sam Soffes Oct 22 '18 at 18:52
  • Still a bug in iOS 12.1 – Cesare Nov 4 '18 at 18:36
  • Unreal guys, unreal. – Mat Jun 27 '19 at 19:16
8

You cann't set renderingMode either from storyboard or xib. It could access by programmatically.

ex:

UIImage *unSeletedImage = [UIImage imageNamed:@"UnSelected.png"];
selectedImage = [selectedImage imageWithRenderingMode:UIImageRenderingModeAlwaysOriginal];
  • 3
    I think, you've made small typos in your code. Second line should be UIImage *selectedImage = [unSeletedImage imageWithRenderingMode:UIImageRenderingModeAlwaysTemplate]; – Artem Stepanenko Oct 22 '13 at 13:23
8

Set tintColor & Class in Storyboard.

//
//  TintColoredImageView.swift
//  TintColoredImageView
//
//  Created by Dmitry Utmanov on 14/07/16.
//  Copyright © 2016 Dmitry Utmanov. All rights reserved.
//

import UIKit

@IBDesignable class TintColoredImageView: UIImageView {

    override var image: UIImage? {
        didSet {
            let _tintColor = self.tintColor
            self.tintColor = nil
            self.tintColor = _tintColor
        }
    }


    override init(frame: CGRect) {
        super.init(frame: frame)
        initialize()
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)
        initialize()
    }

    override init(image: UIImage?) {
        super.init(image: image)
        initialize()
    }

    override init(image: UIImage?, highlightedImage: UIImage?) {
        super.init(image: image, highlightedImage: highlightedImage)
        initialize()
    }

    func initialize() {
        let _tintColor = self.tintColor
        self.tintColor = nil
        self.tintColor = _tintColor
    }

}
  • This is the only answer that worked on new swift. Thank you. – Simon Moshenko Jun 12 '17 at 10:31
  • Doesn't work for me for some weird reason... Is it supposed to update the color in the storyboard? – Cesare Jul 12 '17 at 14:34
4

It's very easy to fix

Just create class UIImageViewPDF and use it in your storyboard

IB_DESIGNABLE
@interface UIImageViewPDF : UIImageView

@end

@implementation UIImageViewPDF

- (void) didMoveToSuperview
{
    [super didMoveToSuperview];
    self.image = [self.image imageWithRenderingMode:UIImageRenderingModeAlwaysTemplate];
    id color = self.tintColor;
    self.tintColor = color;
}

@end
3

Another solution is to create a UIImageView subclass:

final class TemplateImageView: UIImageView {
    override func awakeFromNib() {
        super.awakeFromNib()
        guard let oldImage = image else { return }
        image = nil
        image = oldImage.withRenderingMode(.alwaysTemplate)
    }
}

Then just set the class in the Interface Builder to TemplateImageView.

2

Simple way to be set from Storyboard:

@IBDesignable
public class CustomImageView: UIImageView {
    @IBInspectable var alwaysTemplate: Bool = false {
        didSet {
            if alwaysTemplate {
                self.image = self.image?.withRenderingMode(.alwaysTemplate)
            } else {
                self.image = self.image?.withRenderingMode(.alwaysOriginal)
            }

        }
    }
}

Works fine on iOS 10 and Swift 3

1

In iOS 9 setting the tintColor property in Interface Builder is still buggy.

Note that a working solution besides writing lines directly modifying ImageView properties is to set Render As: Template Image in the asset catalog, and call e.g.:

[[UIImageView appearanceWhenContainedInInstancesOfClasses:@[[MyView class]]] setTintColor:[UIColor whiteColor]];
1

I got fixed this issue by adding runtime attribute tintColor in interface builder.

NOTE : You will still need to set your image to be rendered as a template image in your Images.xcassets file.

enter image description here

0

If you create an IBOutlet you can change it in your awakeFromNib method like so...

self.myImageView.image = [self.myImageView.image imageWithRenderingMode:UIImageRenderingModeAlwaysTemplate];

While @Moby's answer is more correct - this might be more succinct.

  • 1
    The question was how to do this in storyboard (or xib), not in code. – Artem Stepanenko Oct 28 '14 at 14:08
  • @artem - yeah, sorry, I wasn't meaning to infer I had an answer to your question. Merely pointing out a simple way of dealing with this through an IBOutlet – amergin Oct 29 '14 at 17:08
0

Crazy this bug is still in iOS 12.1! For storyboards/xibs: Adding a tag to the UIImageView can be a quick fix.

Swift 4.2

view.viewWithTag(1)?.tintColorDidChange()

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