50

I have a bunch of same-size blocks set to display:inline-block inside a div that has text-align:center set to align the blocks.

|        _____   _____   _____   _____       |
|       |     | |     | |     | |     |      |
|       |  1  | |  2  | |  3  | |  4  |      |
|       |_____| |_____| |_____| |_____|      |
|        _____   _____   _____   _____       |
|       |     | |     | |     | |     |      |
|       |  5  | |  6  | |  7  | |  8  |      |
|       |_____| |_____| |_____| |_____|      |
|                                            |

The blocks fill the div horizontally, and as the browser window shrinks, some blocks break to new lines, creating more rows and less columns. I want everything to still remain centered, with the last row aligned flush to the left, like this :

|        _____   _____   _____        |
|       |     | |     | |     |       |
|       |  1  | |  2  | |  3  |       |
|       |_____| |_____| |_____|       |
|        _____   _____   _____        |
|       |     | |     | |     |       |
|       |  4  | |  5  | |  6  |       |
|       |_____| |_____| |_____|       |
|        _____   _____                |
|       |     | |     |               |
|       |  7  | |  8  |               |
|       |_____| |_____|               |
|                                     |

What currently happens is this:

|        _____   _____   _____        |
|       |     | |     | |     |       |
|       |  1  | |  2  | |  3  |       |
|       |_____| |_____| |_____|       |
|        _____   _____   _____        |
|       |     | |     | |     |       |
|       |  4  | |  5  | |  6  |       |
|       |_____| |_____| |_____|       |
|            _____   _____            |
|           |     | |     |           |
|           |  7  | |  8  |           |
|           |_____| |_____|           |
|                                     |

I cannot add extra filler divs like one suggestion, because there could be any number of blocks, and the amount of rows and columns will vary depending on browser width. I also cannot style block #7 directly, for the same reason. The blocks must always remain centered no matter how many columns.

Here is a pen to better demonstrate:

http://codepen.io/anon/pen/IDsxn

Is this possible? I feel like it sure should be. I would prefer not to use flexbox as it is only ie10+, and I'd like ie9+. I would really like a pure CSS solution, but if you tell me JS is the only way, I'd love to see that in action.

For reference - similar questions, though none were thoroughly explained:

How to align left last row/line in multiple line flexbox

CSS - Left align the last row of images in a centered div

Fix centering last line of elements in fluid container grid to be left aligned while container stays centered

Center multiple inline blocks with CSS and align the last row to the left

14
  • 1
    @j08691 - if the screen width is smaller than the container max-width, then you'll see the issue.
    – andi
    Oct 22 '13 at 20:17
  • 1
    put a background color on the container, then you will see how it's not perfectly centered.
    – andi
    Oct 22 '13 at 20:31
  • 1
    I might guess that this isn't possible. Or maybe you'd need a lot of media queries to exactly specify the container width for every screen size.
    – andi
    Oct 22 '13 at 20:32
  • 1
    @IvanDurst, I played with it for quite some time, and I'm discovering why inline elements are so tough. They are essentially text (so whitespace in your html can get weird). Once they hit the end of the width they're in, there's no shrink-wrapping. You have no indication of when the line ends, that's why we can't do hanging punctuation easily. It's a tough one : ) Sep 18 '15 at 2:34
  • 1
    Funny how I found my answer in your problem. Apr 6 '16 at 20:31
16

Solution with display inline-block

This adaptive grid is much simpler : less markup and less CSS so it will be easier to implement in a production site and adapt to your exact needs.

=>> DEMO <<= (resize the result window to see the effect)

html, body {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}
#container{
    font-size:0;
    margin:0 auto;
    width:1000px;
}
.block {
    font-size:20px;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    margin:25px;
    background: gold;
    display:inline-block;
}

@media screen and (max-width: 430px) {
    #container{
        width:200px;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 431px) and (max-width: 630px) {
   #container{
        width:400px;
    }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 631px) and (max-width: 830px) {
   #container{
        width:600px;
    }
}
@media screen and (min-width: 831px) and (max-width: 1030px) {
   #container{
        width:800px;
    }
}
<div id="container">
    <div class="block">1</div>
    <div class="block">2</div>
    <div class="block">3</div>
    <div class="block">4</div>
    <div class="block">5</div>
    <div class="block">6</div>
    <div class="block">7</div>
    <div class="block">8</div>
    <div class="block">9</div>
    <div class="block">10</div>
    <div class="block">11</div>
    <div class="block">12</div>
    <div class="block">13</div>
</div>

It involves :

  1. 4 media queries for 200px wide blocks and a container expandable to 1000px. Depending on the width of your grid elements and the total width of your container you may have to make less or more

  2. removing white-spaces between inline-block elements (in the following demo I used the font-size technique but you can use other ones (see How to remove the space between inline-block elements? for other techniques)

  3. fixed margins between blocks

The number of blocks in one line adapts to the size of the container. The text-align property stay to default value left so the last items are aligned to the left.


Floats with adaptive margins between both blocks and container

=>> DEMO <<= (you need to resize the result window under 750px to see it in action)

html, body {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    min-width:150px;
}
.wrap {
    float:left;
    position:relative;
}
.foto {
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    background: gold;
    position:absolute;
}

#warning{display:none;}
@media screen and (min-width: 631px) {
    .wrap {
        width:20%;
        padding-bottom:25%;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(4n+2), .wrap:nth-child(4n+3){
        
    }
    .wrap .foto {
        top:-75px;
        margin-top:100%;
        right:-30px;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(4n+2){
        margin:0 5% 0 7.5%;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(4n+3){
     margin-right:7.5%;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(4n+2) .foto{
        left:50%;
        margin-left:-75px;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(4n+3) .foto{
        right:50%;
        margin-right:-75px;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(4n) .foto{
        left:-30px;
    }   
    #container{
        margin-top:-45px;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 481px) and (max-width: 631px) {
    .wrap {
        width:25%;
        padding-bottom:33.3%;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(3n+2){
        margin:0 12.5%;        
    }
    .wrap .foto {
        top:-75px;
        margin-top:100%;
        right:-37px;
    }
     .wrap:nth-child(3n+2) .foto{
        left:50%;
        margin-left:-75px;
    }
     .wrap:nth-child(3n) .foto{
        left:-37px;
    }
    #container{
        margin-top:-37px;
    }
}


@media screen and (min-width: 331px) and (max-width: 480px) {
    .wrap {
        width:33.3%;
        padding-bottom:50%;
        clear:left;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(even) {
        float:right;
        clear:right;
    }
    .wrap .foto {
        top:-75px;
        margin-top:100%;
        right:-50px;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(even) .foto {
        left:-50px;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(4n+3) .foto, .wrap:nth-child(4n+4) .foto {
        bottom:-75px;
        margin-bottom:100%;
    }
    #container{
        margin-top:-25px;
    }
}


@media screen and (max-width: 330px) {
    .wrap {
        width:50%;
        padding-bottom:100%;
        clear:left;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(odd) .foto {
        right:-75px;
        bottom:0;
        bottom:-75px;
        margin-bottom:100%;
    }
    .wrap:nth-child(even) .foto {
        top:0px;
        right:-75px;
        top:-75px;
        margin-top:100%;
    }
}

@media screen and (min-width: 751px) {
    #warning{
        color:#fff;
        display:block;
        position:fixed;
        width:100%;
        height:50%;
        top:25%;
        left:0;
        background:#000;
        text-align:center;
        font-size:30px;
}
<div id="container">
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">1</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">2</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">3</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">4</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">5</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">6</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">7</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">8</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">9</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">10</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">11</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">12</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">13</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">14</div></div>
    <div class="wrap"><div class="foto">15</div></div>
</div>

<!-- FOLLOWING JUST FOR THE DEMO -->
<div id="warning">I haven't written the code for windows bigger than 751px.<br/>
    You must resize this window under 751px.</div>

This technique involves :

  1. floats
  2. position:absolute;
  3. :nt-child() css selector
  4. media queries

It centers the blocks in their container and gives the same margin on the top/left/tight/bottom of all the blocks + sides of the container. As this solution uses floats, the last row is aligned to the left.

The number of blocks in one line adapts to the width of the window.

0
12
+50

Here's a very simple JavaScript (and some small changes in your CSS) solution for you:

http://jsfiddle.net/ha68t/

It's working fine for me.

CSS:

.container {
  margin: 0 auto;
  max-width:960px;
  background-color: gold;
}

.block {
  background-color: #ddd;
  border:1px solid #999;
  display: block;
  float: left;
  height: 100px;
  margin: 4px 2px;
  width: 100px;
}

JavaScript:

$(document).ready(function(){
    setContainerWidth();
});

$(window).resize(function(){
   setContainerWidth();
});

function setContainerWidth()
{
    $('.container').css('width', 'auto'); //reset
    var windowWidth = $(document).width();
    var blockWidth = $('.block').outerWidth(true);
    var maxBoxPerRow = Math.floor(windowWidth / blockWidth);
    $('.container').width(maxBoxPerRow * blockWidth);
}

jQuery is required :)

4
  • This is the easiest implementation on this page, even if it has to use a little js. I don't need the solution anymore, but someone will!
    – Ivan Durst
    May 24 '14 at 0:11
  • 2
    In the question you stated you "would really like a pure CSS solution", but marked this answer as the accepted. Not sure what's going on, is it opposite day? If it is, does that mean it is not? But if is not, does it mean that it is even if it isn't? Who am I? What time is it? Where's Waldo? What's that very bright light? Mom?........
    – Cthulhu
    Mar 29 '16 at 10:20
  • @Cthulhu: hah. " I would really like a pure CSS solution, but if you tell me JS is the only way, I'd love to see that in action." He put it into action. I liked his solution best. There you have it!
    – Ivan Durst
    Jun 15 '16 at 21:05
  • 1
    this really show how broken CSS is if the accepted solution uses jQuery :( Dec 9 '16 at 11:18
11

For what it's worth: It's now 2017 and the grid layout module does this out of the box

* {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}

.container {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, 100px);
  grid-gap: 10px;
  justify-content: center;
  align-content: flex-start;
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align: center;
  margin-top: 10px;
}
.block {
  background-color: #ddd;
  border: 1px solid #999;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
}
<div class="container">
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
  <div class="block">Foo</div>
</div>

(Codepen demo).

If the browser support suits you - then use grid. If not, then read on....


As mentioned in @Web-tiki's answer, the best you can do with CSS is with a series of media queries.

That being said, if you are using a preprocessor such as LESS - this isn't such a difficult or error-prone task. (although, yes, the CSS will still be long and ugly)

UPDATED CODEPEN (Resize the window to see the results)

Here's how to take advantage of LESS to set up the media queries:

First set up some less variables according to the design which you need:

@item-width:100px;
@item-height:100px;
@marginV: 4px;
@marginH: 2px;
@min-cols:2;
@max-cols:9; //set an upper limit of how may columns you want to write the media queries for

Then:

Set up an iteration mixin like this: (You can paste this code into http://less2css.org)

.loopingClass (@index-width) when (@index-width <= @item-width * @max-cols) {
    @media (min-width:@index-width) {
        .container{
            width: @index-width;
        }
    }

    .loopingClass(@index-width + @item-width + 2*@marginH);
}

.loopingClass (@item-width * @min-cols + @min-cols*@marginH*2);

The above mixin will spit out a series of media queries in the form:

@media (min-width: 208px) {
  .container {
    width: 208px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 312px) {
  .container {
    width: 312px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 416px) {
  .container {
    width: 416px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 520px) {
  .container {
    width: 520px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 624px) {
  .container {
    width: 624px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 728px) {
  .container {
    width: 728px;
  }
}
@media (min-width: 832px) {
  .container {
    width: 832px;
  }
}

With remaining CSS (LESS):

.container {
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align: center;
  overflow: auto;
    min-width: @min-cols * @item-width;
    max-width: @max-cols * @item-width;
    display: block;
    list-style:none;
}
.block {
  background-color: #ddd;
  border:1px solid #999;
  box-sizing:border-box;
  float: left;
  height: @item-height;
  width: @item-width;
  margin:@marginV @marginH;
}

... you get the desired result.

...and it's super easy to customize the layout:

All I need to do is change the variables that I used in the LESS mixin according to my needs - I get the exact layout that I'm after.

2
  • 1
    +1 for creativity. Though I have a hard time accepting that many media queries
    – Ivan Durst
    May 24 '14 at 0:00
  • 1
    I just added a css grid solution to the post :)
    – Danield
    Sep 7 '17 at 14:18
3

With flexbox, some pseudo elements, an extra div, and after a lot of frustration I was able to achieve this without media queries (since I needed to put my grid inside many different sized elements, media queries wouldn't really work for me).

One caveat: gutters between items are fluid.

Demo: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/OXvxEW

CSS:

.wrapper {
    display: flex;
    flex-wrap: wrap;
    border: 2px solid #ffc0cb;
    max-width: 1100px;
    margin: 0.5rem auto;
    justify-content: center;
}

.wrapper:after {
    content: ' ';
    flex: 1;
    height: 100%;
    border: 1px solid #00f;
    margin: 0.5rem;
}

.child {
    flex: 1;
    border: 2px solid #ffa500;
    min-width: 300px;
    margin: 0.5rem;
    text-align: center;
}

.child-contents {
    width: 300px;
    border: 2px solid #008000;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

HTML:

<div class='wrapper'>
    <div class='child'>
        <div class='child-contents'></div>
    </div>
    <div class='child'>
        <div class='child-contents'></div>
    </div>
    <div class='child'>
        <div class='child-contents'></div>
    </div>

    ...etc., more .child's...

</div>

The end result is something like this, where the green rectangles are divs. The pink/orange borders are just for reference so you can see what's going on. If you remove the pink/orange borders, you should get the grid you're looking for (though again, note that the gutter are fluid).

enter image description here

2
  • I'll look at this more when I have time, but you may be onto something. (Although it's broken in Safari 9.1)
    – Ivan Durst
    Aug 27 '16 at 0:10
  • This approach really worked for me! Using flex: auto on pseudo-element really makes the difference. I was looking for this solution for so long. Thank you!
    – richardaum
    Jan 18 '20 at 4:25
3

Try this with simple css:

CSS:

.row{text-align:center;font-size:0;} .block{text-align:center;display:inline-block;width:150px;height:15px;margin:5px; border:1px solid #dddddd;font-size:13px;}

HTML:

<div class="row">
  <div class="block"></div> 
</div>

.row{text-align:center;font-size:0;}
    .block{text-align:center;display:inline-block;width:150px;height:150px;margin:5px; border:1px solid #dddddd;font-size:13px;line-height:150px;}
<div class="row">
      <div class="block">1</div> 
      <div class="block">2</div> 
      <div class="block">3</div> 
      <div class="block">4</div> 
      <div class="block">5</div> 
      <div class="block">6</div> 
      <div class="block">7</div> 
      <div class="block">8</div> 
    </div>

5
  • Elements are not centered in container here - they're left aligned. The margin needs to be the same on the left and right side.
    – Ivan Durst
    Jun 15 '16 at 21:01
  • I don't see any issues please elaborate more. I have edited margin issue. Jun 16 '16 at 8:18
  • The elements need to be centered in the container, right now they are left aligned. Read the question again:)
    – Ivan Durst
    Aug 27 '16 at 0:09
  • @Ivan Durst, Check now, I changed to text-align:center; on the row. Aug 29 '16 at 5:39
  • None of the above worked for me correctly, except this solution. Great! :) This is exactly what I looked for.
    – szatti1489
    Feb 10 '20 at 11:06
2

To date, the only clean solution for this is with the

CSS Grid Layout Module (Codepen demo)

Basically the relevant code necessary boils down to this:

ul {
  display: grid; /* (1) */
  grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, 120px); /* (2) */
  grid-gap: 1rem; /* (3) */
  justify-content: center; /* (4) */
  align-content: flex-start; /* (5) */
}

1) Make the container element a grid container

2) Set the grid with an 'auto' amount of columns of width 120px. (The auto-fill value is used for responsive layouts).

3) Set gaps/gutters for the grid rows and columns.

4) and 5) - Similar to flexbox.

body {
  margin: 0;
}
ul {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, 120px);
  grid-gap: 1rem;
  justify-content: center;
  align-content: flex-start;
  
  /* boring properties: */
  list-style: none;
  width: 90vw;
  height: 90vh;
  margin: 2vh auto;
  border: 5px solid green;
  padding: 0;
  overflow: auto;
}
li {
  background: tomato;
  height: 120px;
}
<ul>
  <li>1</li>
  <li>2</li>
  <li>3</li>
  <li>4</li>
  <li>5</li>
  <li>6</li>
  <li>7</li>
  <li>8</li>
  <li>9</li>
  <li>10</li>
</ul>

Codepen demo (Resize to see the effect)


Browser Support - Caniuse

Currently supported by Chrome (Blink) and Firefox, with partial support from IE and Edge (See this post by Rachel Andrew)


Further reading on CSS grids:

1

Use flexbox:

.container {
  display: -webkit-flex;
   display: flex;
   -webkit-flex-direction: row; 
   flex-direction: row;
   -webkit-justify-content: flex-start;
   justify-content: flex-start;
   flex-wrap:wrap;
}

.block {
  background-color: #ddd;
  border:1px solid #999;
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100px;
  margin: 4px 2px;
  width: 100px;
}

Done.

4
  • 3
    Thanks hawk. The problem with this is that the whole set of blocks are aligned left inside of the container, so there will be an awkward white margin on the right hand side at some sizes inside the container (see this pen and resize the window: codepen.io/anon/pen/pvXoEZ). You can fix this with justify-content: center;, but then the blocks at the bottom will be aligned center, not aligned with the first column, which was the original problem. Also was looking to support IE9+, but would still love to see a flexbox solution. Getting close!
    – Ivan Durst
    Apr 8 '15 at 22:09
  • 1
    @IvanDurst you can add flex-grow: 1; to .block
    – 9ete
    Apr 8 '15 at 22:54
  • 1
    @hawkeye126, if you add flex-grow:1 to .block you're resizing the blocks in the last row which is not what I think @IvanDurst has wanted. May 4 '16 at 21:47
  • 1
    @GabrielKohen is correct - we don't want to resize any blocks individually, they are a fixed size.
    – Ivan Durst
    Jun 15 '16 at 21:02
0

There is no "normal" solution for your problem, but only the mentioned "workarounds".

The situation is, your container of blocks will fill up available space up to the maximum available/set-up and then break all the inner blocks to the next line, which will cause the container have overflow. Also with other configurations like floating it will be the same behaviour. That's the way the rendering works - everytime greedy in space to calculate the inner elements behaviour.

Maybe the future Flexboxes will make this possible - but I did not read the full specs. Just a guess...

1
  • Thanks Mohre, you may be right. FYI this should be a comment, not an answer.
    – Ivan Durst
    Jun 15 '16 at 21:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.