76

I've had success using the groupby function to sum or average a given variable by groups, but is there a way to aggregate into a list of values, rather than to get a single result? (And would this still be called aggregation?)

I am not entirely sure this is the approach I should be taking anyhow, so below is an example of the transformation I'd like to make, with toy data.

That is, if the data look something like this:

    A    B    C  
    1    10   22
    1    12   20
    1    11   8
    1    10   10
    2    11   13
    2    12   10 
    3    14   0

What I am trying to end up with is something like the following. I am not totally sure whether this can be done through groupby aggregating into lists, and am rather lost as to where to go from here.

Hypothetical output:

     A    B    C  New1  New2  New3  New4  New5  New6
    1    10   22  12    20    11    8     10    10
    2    11   13  12    10 
    3    14   0

Perhaps I should be pursuing pivots instead? The order by which the data are put into columns does not matter - all columns B through New6 in this example are equivalent. All suggestions/corrections are much appreciated.

7 Answers 7

105

I used the following

grouped = df.groupby('A')

df = grouped.aggregate(lambda x: tuple(x))

df['grouped'] = df['B'] + df['C']
5
  • 4
    This one gets my vote! It returns a group-by'd dataframe, the cell contents of which are lists containing the values contained in the group. Jul 21, 2015 at 12:22
  • 20
    if you wanted one column to be aggregated into a list you could do df.groupby('A', as_index=False)['B'].agg({'list':(lambda x: list(x))}) Nov 12, 2015 at 23:45
  • 4
    Just df.groupby('A', as_index=False)['B'].agg(list) will do. Jan 24, 2019 at 10:01
  • 3
    tuple can already be called as a function, so no need to write .aggregate(lambda x: tuple(x)) it could be .aggregate(tuple) directly. Think about it, you're creating a function whose sole purpose is to call another function with a single parameter. Sep 6, 2019 at 10:51
  • any idea how to take care for null records, currently it is converting it into {nan} and can not do anything with it. Jul 2, 2020 at 15:26
50

I am answering the question as stated in its title and first sentence: the following aggregates values to lists:

df.groupby('A').aggregate(lambda tdf: tdf.unique().tolist())

Below this is demonstrated in a simple example:

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame( {'A' : [1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3], 'B' : [10, 12, 11, 10, 11, 12, 14], 'C' : [22, 20,     8, 10, 13, 10, 0]})
print df

df2 = df.groupby('A').aggregate(lambda tdf: tdf.unique().tolist())
print df2
# Old version:
# df2=df.groupby(['A']).apply(lambda tdf: pd.Series(  dict([[vv,tdf[vv].unique().tolist()] for vv in tdf if vv not in ['A']])  )) 

The output is as follows:

In [3]: run tmp
   A   B   C
0  1  10  22
1  1  12  20
2  1  11   8
3  1  10  10
4  2  11  13
5  2  12  10
6  3  14   0

[7 rows x 3 columns]
              B                C
A                               
1  [10, 12, 11]  [22, 20, 8, 10]
2      [11, 12]         [13, 10]
3          [14]              [0]

[3 rows x 2 columns]
2
  • 5
    The only answer that actually does what the question states! A downvote for the question itself, cause "aggregate into a list" is very different than creating new columns... Jan 27, 2015 at 8:41
  • Admitting that I didn't actually read the question, this one did what I was hoping when I googled pandas groupby array_agg. I was looking for an equivalent to SQL (postgres) array_agg. This answer actually does a little better than that (imo), it unique array aggs every column except the groupedby ones.
    – Sigfried
    Nov 29, 2019 at 11:27
28

Here is a one liner

# if list of unique items is desired, use set
df.groupby('A',as_index=False)['B'].aggregate(lambda x: set(x))

# if duplicate items are okay, use list
df.groupby('A',as_index=False)['B'].aggregate(lambda x: list(x))
3
  • 1
    I think two sets of brackets have to be used around 'B' to make this work, i.e. df.groupby('A',as_index=False)[['B']].aggregate(lambda x: set(x))
    – ythdelmar
    Sep 1, 2017 at 2:22
  • 3
    Others one liners: df.groupby('A', as_index=False).aggregate(pd.Series.tolist) df.groupby('A', as_index=False).aggregate(lambda x: x.unique().tolist()) Oct 23, 2017 at 16:57
  • 1
    Good solution, better username
    – Austin A
    Apr 12, 2018 at 17:17
16

Similar solution, but fairly transparent (I think). you can get full list or unique lists.

df = pd.DataFrame({'A':[1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3,4,5], 
                   'B':[6,7, 8,8,9, 9,9,10,11,12], 
                   'C':['foo']*10})

df
Out[24]: 
   A   B    C
0  1   6  foo
1  1   7  foo
2  2   8  foo
3  2   8  foo
4  2   9  foo
5  3   9  foo
6  3   9  foo
7  3  10  foo
8  4  11  foo
9  5  12  foo

list_agg = df.groupby(by='A').agg({'B':lambda x: list(x), 
                                   'C':lambda x: tuple(x)})

list_agg
Out[26]: 
                 C           B
A                             
1       (foo, foo)      [6, 7]
2  (foo, foo, foo)   [8, 8, 9]
3  (foo, foo, foo)  [9, 9, 10]
4           (foo,)        [11]
5           (foo,)        [12]

unique_list_agg = df.groupby(by='A').agg({'B':lambda x: list(pd.unique(x)), 
                                          'C':lambda x: tuple(pd.unique(x))})

unique_list_agg
Out[28]: 
        C        B
A                 
1  (foo,)   [6, 7]
2  (foo,)   [8, 9]
3  (foo,)  [9, 10]
4  (foo,)     [11]
5  (foo,)     [12]
5

my solution is a bit longer than you may expect, I'm sure it could be shortened, but:

g = df.groupby("A").apply(lambda x: pd.concat((x["B"], x["C"])))
k = g.reset_index()
k["i"] = k1.index
k["rn"] = k1.groupby("A")["i"].rank()
k.pivot_table(rows="A", cols="rn", values=0)

# output
# rn   1   2   3   4   5   6
# A                         
# 1   10  12  11  22  20   8
# 2   10  11  10  13 NaN NaN
# 3   14  10 NaN NaN NaN NaN

A bit of explanation. First line, g = df.groupby("A").apply(lambda x: pd.concat((x["B"], x["C"]))). This one group df by A and then put columns B and C into one column:

A   
1  0    10
   1    12
   2    11
   0    22
   1    20
   2     8
2  3    10
   4    11
   3    10
   4    13
3  5    14
   5    10

Then k = g.reset_index(), creating sequential index, result is:

    A  level_1   0
0   1        0  10
1   1        1  12
2   1        2  11
3   1        0  22
4   1        1  20
5   1        2   8
6   2        3  10
7   2        4  11
8   2        3  10
9   2        4  13
10  3        5  14
11  3        5  10

Now I want to move this index into column (I'd like to hear how I can make a sequential column without resetting index), k["i"] = k1.index:

    A  level_1   0   i
0   1        0  10   0
1   1        1  12   1
2   1        2  11   2
3   1        0  22   3
4   1        1  20   4
5   1        2   8   5
6   2        3  10   6
7   2        4  11   7
8   2        3  10   8
9   2        4  13   9
10  3        5  14  10
11  3        5  10  11

Now, k["rn"] = k1.groupby("A")["i"].rank() will add row_number inside each A (like row_number() over(partition by A order by i) in SQL:

    A  level_1   0   i  rn
0   1        0  10   0   1
1   1        1  12   1   2
2   1        2  11   2   3
3   1        0  22   3   4
4   1        1  20   4   5
5   1        2   8   5   6
6   2        3  10   6   1
7   2        4  11   7   2
8   2        3  10   8   3
9   2        4  13   9   4
10  3        5  14  10   1
11  3        5  10  11   2

And finally, just pivoting with k.pivot_table(rows="A", cols="rn", values=0):

rn   1   2   3   4   5   6
A                         
1   10  12  11  22  20   8
2   10  11  10  13 NaN NaN
3   14  10 NaN NaN NaN NaN
2
  • Actually you accomplish the end point I was looking for in the first line of code! I thought I would have to groupby and assemble lists first (as in the other answer here), but this cuts straight to the goal. I'm giving this the accept because it's what I'm using, but the other answer is also a good solution to the way I explained the problem.
    – M.A.Kline
    Oct 23, 2013 at 23:13
  • This answer is a better general-purpose answer. Jun 15, 2020 at 17:19
1

I have been struggling with the exact same issues, and the answer is that yes you can use grouby to obtain lists. I am not 100% sure I am doing this in the most pythonic way, but here for what its worth is my attempt to get at your question. You can create lists of the data contained in the bygroups like this:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from itertools import chain

Data = {'A' : [1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3], 'B' : [10, 12, 11, 10, 11, 12, 14], 'C' : [22, 20,     8, 10, 13, 10, 0]}
DF = pd.DataFrame(Data)
DFGrouped = DF.groupby('A')

OutputLists = []

for group in DFGrouped:
    AList = list(group[1].A)
    BList = list(group[1].B)
    CList = list(group[1].C)
    print list(group[1].A)
    print list(group[1].B)
    print list(group[1].C)
    ZIP =  zip(BList, CList)
    print ZIP
    OutputLists.append(list(chain(*ZIP)))

OutputLists

This outputs your data in a list of lists, in the way that I think you want it. You can then make it a data frame. The above print statements are for illustrative purposes only clearly. The most efficient (in terms of code) way to do this using my method is as follows:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from itertools import chain

Data = {'A' : [1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3], 'B' : [10, 12, 11, 10, 11, 12, 14], 'C' : [22, 20, 8, 10, 13, 10, 0]}
DF = pd.DataFrame(Data)
DFGrouped = DF.groupby('A')
OutputLists = []
for group in DFGrouped:
    ZIPPED = zip(group[1].B, group[1].C)
    OutputLists.append(list(chain(*ZIPPED)))
OutputLists

The key to getting lists out of grouped data as far as I can tell is to recognise that the data themselves are stored in group[1] for each group in your grouped data.

hope this helps!

1
df2 = df.groupby('A').aggregate(lambda tdf: tdf.unique().tolist())

This seems to work perfect, but the resultant dataframe has two layers of columns and df.columns shows only one column in the dataframe. To correct this, use:

df2_copy=df2.copy()
df2_copy = df2_copy.reset_index(col_level=0)

You can view the column levels using: df2_copy.columns=df2_copy.columns.get_level_values(0)

the df2_copy() should solve this.

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